COUNCIL AGENDA

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

27 March 2019

 

BRINGELLY COMMUNITY HALL

5 GREENDALE ROAD BRINGELLY


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You are hereby notified that an Ordinary Council Meeting of Liverpool City Council will be held at the Bringelly Community Hall, 5 Greendale Road, Bringelly on Wednesday, 27 March 2019 commencing at 6.00pm. Doors to the Bringelly Community Hall will open at 5.50pm.

 

Liverpool City Council Meetings are taped for the purposes of minute taking and record keeping.  If you have any enquiries please contact Council and Executive Services on 8711 7584.

 

 

 

 


Kiersten Fishburn

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

 

 


 

 

 


Order of Business

 

                                                                                                              PAGE     TAB

Opening

Acknowledgment of Country and Prayer

National Anthem

Apologies 

Condolences

Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council Meeting held on 27 February 2019.............................................................. 8

Declarations of Interest

Public Forum

Mayoral Report

NIL

Notices of Motion Of Rescission

NOMR 01       Rescission of EGROW 08 Responses to Advocacy, Liverpool's Time is Now from the Council meeting of 27 February 2019...................................................... 63......... 1

Development Application Determination Report

NIL

City Economy and Growth Report

EGROW 01    Adoption of International Trade Engagement Strategy.................................. 66......... 2

EGROW 02    Liverpool Development Control Plan - Draft Amendment 33 and Liverpool Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan Amendment - Shopping Trolleys - Post Exhibition Report ................................................................................... 70......... 3

EGROW 03    Proposed amendment to Schedule 1 Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 - additional permitted use for multi dwelling housing at 123 Epsom Road, Chipping Norton............................................................................................................. 74......... 4

EGROW 04    Destination Management Plan 2018/19 - 2022/23......................................... 81......... 5

EGROW 05    Post Exhibition Report - Schedule 1 Amendment to Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 - Draft Amendment 73 at 2A & 4 Helles Ave, Moorebank............ 88......... 6

EGROW 06    Proposed Amendment to State Environmental Planning Policy (Sydney Region Growth Centres) 2006 - Austral / Leppington North Precinct and Liverpool Growth Centre Precinct DCP...................................................................................... 92......... 7

EGROW 07    Moorebank R4 zoning - Findings of community engagement .................... 106......... 8

Chief Executive Officer Report

CEO 01           Amendments to Code of Meeting Practice for public exhibition ................. 117......... 9

CEO 02           Council Resolution to Adopt Recipient of Funds from 2019 Charity Ball ... 126....... 10

CEO 03           Enterprise Risk Management Policy............................................................ 128....... 11

City Community and Culture Report

COM 01          Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship........................................... 130....... 12

COM 02          Delegation to Sister City Regione Calabria.................................................. 137....... 13

City Corporate Report

CORP 01        Sydney Western City Planning Panel - Remuneration for Council representatives 141 14

CORP 02        Investment Report February 2019................................................................ 144....... 15

CORP 03        Provision of Public Parking to City Centre South......................................... 153....... 16

City Presentation Report

NIL

City Infrastructure and Environment Report

INF 01             Conservation of Koala Habitat Corridors...................................................... 162....... 17

Committee Reports

CTTE 01         Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee held on 5 February 2019 165....... 18

CTTE 02         Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council meeting held 13 February 2019.... 172....... 19

CTTE 03         Minutes of Aboriginal Consultative Committee held on 7 February 2019... 179....... 20

CTTE 04         Minutes of the Strategic Panel held on 11 February 2019........................... 184....... 21

CTTE 05         Minutes of the Intermodal Committee meeting held on 14 February 2019. 190....... 22

CTTE 06         Minutes of the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee Meeting held on 8 February 2019............................................................................................... 199....... 23

CTTE 07         Minutes of the Tourism and CBD Committee Minutes held on 5 February 2019     211 24

Questions with Notice

QWN 01          Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Small Streets...................................... 218....... 25

QWN 02          Question with Notice - Clr Shelton - Busking Policy.................................... 221....... 26

QWN 03          Question with Notice - Clr Shelton - Solar Panels on Council Buildings..... 222....... 27  

Presentations by Councillors

 

Notices of Motion

NOM 01          Governance of Political Corflute Placements on Public Property................ 223....... 28

NOM 02          Inclusive Record of Council Motions............................................................ 226....... 29

NOM 03          Celebrating St Luke's Church 200 Years..................................................... 228....... 30

NOM 04          Parking Meters ............................................................................................. 230....... 31

NOM 05          Compliance Levy.......................................................................................... 232....... 32  

Council in Closed Session

The following item is listed for consideration by Council in Closed Session with the public excluded, in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 1993 as listed below:

 

CONF 01    Vehicle Hydraulic, Repairs and External Servicing Services

Reason:     Item CONF 01 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(d i) (d ii) of the Local Government Act because it contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; AND commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council.  

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MINUTES OF THE Ordinary Meeting

HELD ON 27 February 2019

 

 

PRESENT:

Mayor Wendy Waller

Councillor Ayyad

Councillor Balloot

Councillor Hadchiti

Councillor Hadid

Councillor Hagarty

Councillor Harle

Councillor Kaliyanda (arrived at 6.30pm)

Councillor Karnib

Councillor Rhodes

Councillor Shelton

Ms Kiersten Fishburn, Chief Executive Officer

Mr Tim Moore, Director City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

Mr Chris White, Director City Corporate

Ms Tina Sangiuliano, Acting Director City Community and Culture

Dr Eddie Jackson, Director City Deal

Mr Peter Patterson, Director City Presentation

Mr Raj Autar, Director City Infrastructure and Environment

 

 The meeting commenced at 6.00pm.

 

 

OPENING                                                 6.00pm.

Prayer

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF COUNTRY, The prayer of the Council was read by Pastor

PRAYER OF COUNCIL AND                  Ragy Atalla from Liverpool Presbyterian Arabic

AFFIRMATION TO BE READ BY           Church.

 

NATIONAL ANTHEM                              The National Anthem, recorded and performed by  Rebecca Ferro was played at the meeting.

APOLOGIES                                            Nil

 

CONDOLENCE                                                

Ms Beverly Wilson (read by Mayor Waller)

 

Beverly Wilson passed away peacefully on 17 February 2019.

 

She was a member of the Liverpool Netball Association (LNA) for 37 years, serving as an integral part of its Executive.

 

In 2007, Beverly received an Order of Liverpool award in the “Gold Companion” category.

 

In 2013, she was part of the LNA’s executive when the association was awarded Council’s Australia Day Sports Award and recognised for its unwavering devotion to sporting pursuits in the Liverpool LGA.

 

On behalf of all at Liverpool City Council, I express my deepest condolences to Beverly Wilson’s family and friends at this difficult time. I am sure that Beverly’s enthusiasm for sport and her community spirit will live on in all those who had the pleasure of knowing her.

 

May she rest in peace.

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Mayor Waller           Seconded: Clr Hadchiti

 

That Council writes to the family of Ms Beverly Wilson expressing our condolences for their loss.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Council then observed one minute silence.

 Confirmation of Minutes

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton                        Seconded: Clr Rhodes

That the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting held on 6 February 2019 be confirmed as a true
record of that meeting.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

Declarations of Interest                             

Clr Rhodes declared a pecuniary interest in the following item: 

Item:          CONF 01 BMX Track Powell Park – Unauthorised importation of contaminated waste

Reason:     An organisation mentioned in this item contributes occasionally financially to the Your Liverpool Community Magazine that she publishes.

Clr Rhodes left the Chambers for the duration of this item. 

 

Clr Shelton declared a non-pecuniary, less than significant interest in the following item: 

Item:          CONF 02 Review of Four Day Week for Outdoor Staff

Reason:     He is an ordinary member of the United Services Union. 

Clr Shelton remained in the Chambers for the duration of this item. 

 

Clr Kaliyanda  declared a pecuniary interest in the following item: 

 

Item:                    EGROW 08 Responses to Advocacy, Liverpool's Time is Now

 

Reason:              She is a candidate for the upcoming State election with the Labor Party.  The motion moved refers to election policy.

 

Clr Kaliyanda left the Chambers for this item when the motion was moved. 

PRESENTATION TO THE 2018 HSC HIGH ACHIEVERS

Local students that live or attended high school in the Liverpool LGA that achieved an ATAR higher than 95 or were ranked in the top 5 in NSW in their subjects for the 2018 HSC were congratulated and presented with certificates from the Mayor.

Public Forum

Presentation – items not on agenda    

1.       Nil.

Representation – items on agenda

 

  1. John Anderson addressed Council on the following item:

NOM 02        Clean Air For Liverpool and Moorebank Intermodal. 

 

Clr Hadchiti left the Chambers at 6.24pm.

Clr Hadchiti returned to the Chambers at 6.27pm.

 

Motion:                      Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Hagarty  

 

That a three minute extension of time be given to the speaker.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Clr Kaliyanda arrived at the meeting at 6.30pm.

 

  1. Robert Storey addressed Council on the following item:

EGROW 07 Post Exhibition Report Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 – Draft Amendment 54 (Reclassification of Community Land and rezoning of Part Lot 10 DP 1162812) Hammondville Park, Hammondville.

 

Motion:                      Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That a three minute extension of time be given to the speaker.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

  1. Astra Staines addressed Council on the following item:

EGROW 07 Post Exhibition Report Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 – Draft Amendment 54 (Reclassification of Community Land and rezoning of Part Lot 10 DP 1162812) Hammondville Park, Hammondville.

4.    Domenic Penna addressed Council on the following item:

EGROW 07 Post Exhibition Report Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 – Draft Amendment 54 (Reclassification of Community Land and rezoning of Part Lot 10 DP 1162812) Hammondville Park, Hammondville.

 

Motion:                      Moved: Clr Rhodes                        Seconded: Clr Hadchiti

 

That a three minute extension of time be given to the speaker.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

  1. Jeff Gibbs addressed Council on the following item:

EGROW 07 Post Exhibition Report Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 – Draft Amendment 54 (Reclassification of Community Land and rezoning of Part Lot 10 DP 1162812) Hammondville Park, Hammondville.

 

  1. Mohamed El Dardiry from Architecture Design Studio (NSW) P/L on behalf of the applicant addressed Council on the following item:

EGROW 06 Proposed Amendment to Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 – Rezoning of land at 4-8 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool.


 

Mayoral Report

 

ITEM NO:       MAYOR 01

FILE NO:        048338.2019

SUBJECT:     Re-Establishment of Sister City Relationship with Calabria

 

At the Council meeting of 26 July 1993, a Mayoral Minute was presented that proposed the establishment of a Sister City relationship between Calabria and Liverpool. In part this was proposed due to community of Italians generally and Calabrians specifically who have made Liverpool their home. The Motion was supported by Council and in November of that year a formal agreement between the two cities was signed.

 

Over the years of that agreement, there have been sporadic connections made between Calabria and Liverpool. These have included visits from dignitaries from Calabria to Liverpool and delegations from Council visiting Calabria. In 2011 during my previous term as Mayor, I visited Calabria at my own expense.

 

In February 2015, Council hosted a Calabrian delegation visiting Australia to a morning tea at Casula Powerhouse.  The visiting group consisted of Father Rocco from St Francis of Paola Monastery (Calabria Italy) and his Religious Assistant (also a Journalist), Assunta Orlando.  Whilst in Sydney Father Rocco conducted a mass for the Italian community devotees of St Francis at Mount Carmel Church in Liverpool. 

 

At that time the Calabrian delegates and local Italian business people in attendance expressed a desire for the re-establishment of the Sister City relationship.

 

In February 2016, Council resolved that Officers were to reconnect with our sister city in Calabria to explore opportunities to develop and enhance the cultural relationship between the two cities in ways that are mutually beneficial, including a delegation from Council to attend Calabria.

 

An invitation has now been received to participate in the Calabrian Sister City program anticipating a visit to Rocella in early July 2019 for a cultural festival, which includes a blessing of the fleet and other cultural activities.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Mayor Waller

 

That Council:

 

  1. Acknowledge the invitation and receive a more detailed report at the March meeting of Council on cultural connections between Rocella and Liverpool; and

 

  1. Provide an appropriate workspace to support the Sister City Committee that are a part of the liaison with Calabria until such time the visit is resolved.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

MOTION TO BRING ITEM FORWARD

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Mayor Waller

 

That item NOM 03 Liverpool's Coptic Community - St George & Prince Theodore Coptic Orthodox Church be brought forward and dealt with now.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED. 

ITEM NO:       NOM 03

FILE NO:        037008.2019

SUBJECT:     Liverpool's Coptic Community - St George & Prince Theodore Coptic Orthodox Church

 

BACKGROUND

 

Council in previous years has worked with the Coptic community in Liverpool to help build and expand their humble Church to meet the needs of the growing congregation.

In 2009, Council agreed to sell a small portion of surplus land and a portion of a dead end road to the neighbouring Church to allow it to expand. A price was mutually  agreed upon and the Church went through the challenge of raising funds to fund the purchase.

It has been 10 years now and the community has been waiting ever so patiently for Council and the relevant bodies to prepare the appropriate paperwork which has now been completed. The congregation were constantly told, for years, that the paperwork would be completed ‘imminently’.

Now that everything is ready to go, Council has changed the goal posts at the last minute and changed the price of the land. At no stage was any indication given that this would happen. Attached is correspondence from Council outlining the terms and price of the land.

To ask the congregation to raise a significant more amount of money now is unfair.

 

The Coptic communities contribution to the Liverpool and wider community is immeasurable and we should appreciate that and support them with all their endeavours. The St George & Prince Theodore Coptic Orthodox Church Liverpool currently is and in its expanded form will continue to be an important part of Liverpool and an icon for years to come.

 

Liverpool’s moto which proudly sits on our Crest is “Without God everything is in vain”.

Therefore we should do everything possible to assist in building places where the Love of our Creator is taught. 


This motion calls on Council to be true to their word and honour the arrangements previously agree to.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Ayyad)

 

That Council:

 

1.   Honour the original price and terms as agreed to with the St George & Prince Theodore Coptic Orthodox Church - Liverpool as per the attached email sent by Council (in closed cover);

 

2.   Assist the St George & Prince Theodore Coptic Orthodox Church - Liverpool in all matters relating to their development application and rezoning (if required) to make for the time lost over the last 10 years from when this matter started; and

 

3.   Thank all of the committee and congregation members from St George & Prince Theodore Coptic Orthodox Church - Liverpool for their patience in this matter and their overall contribution to Liverpool.

Mayor Waller called a recess of Council at 6.53pm.

 

Mayor Waller reopened Council at 7.02pm with all Councillors present except Clr Balloot.

 

Clr Balloot retired from the meeting at 7.02pm.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                         Seconded: Clr Hadchiti

 

That Council:

 

1.            Approve the disposal to the adjoining owner, being the Coptic Orthodox Church (NSW) Property Trust, of land at McLean Street, Liverpool, consisting of parcels of land identified by Council report and resolution GFSR05, item 2007/0636, on 14 September 2009:

 

a.    Lot 1 DP 1246664 (closed road – “Parcel 1”); and

b.    Part of Lot 17 DP 31863 (approximately 132m2 in area - “Parcel 2”).

 

 

 

2.            Approve the disposal to the adjoining owner, being the Coptic Orthodox Church (NSW) Property Trust, of land at McLean Street, Liverpool, consisting of Part Lot 17, DP 31683 (approximately 135m2 in area) as identified by Council correspondence to the Coptic Church dated 31 May 2011 (“Parcel 3”), reference 093036.2011.

 

3.            That the sale price of Parcels 1 and 2 be that amount previously agreed between the parties and subject to Council resolution on 14 September 2009 (GFSR05), with adjustments in Council’s favour as necessary to cover Council’s costs of road closure and land disposal as outlined in Council’s report of 23 May 2011 (CORS 02, 2007/0636), and consistent with the following correspondence between the parties:

 

a.    Letter from Council to the Coptic Church, dated 25 March 2009 (offering to sell property for stated price);

b.    Letter from Council to the Coptic Church, dated 20 July 2009 (confirming Council’s offer to sell property for stated price); and

c.     Letter from the Coptic Church to Council, dated 26 August 2009 (accepting Council’s offer and forming the basis of the staff report to Council GFSR05 on 14 September 2009).

 

4.            That the sale price of Parcel 3 be a per-square-metre price consistent with Council’s most recent valuation of the “Part Tepper Park” parcels dated 29 October 2018 (undertaken by Kenny & Good Pty Ltd), and communicated to the Church on 8 January 2019 (Council reference 004527.2019).

 

5.            That the combined sale of parcels 1, 2 and 3 be subject to the approval of a development application for subdivision and consolidation.

 

6.            Transfer proceeds of the combined sales to the Property Development Reserve.

 

7.            Keeps confidential this information pursuant to the provisions of Section 10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993 as this information would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business. 

 

8.            Authorises its delegated officer to execute any documents, under power of attorney, necessary to give effect to this decision.

 

9.            That all valuations are deemed valid for three months from the date of Council Resolution. If no exchange has taken place within three months, the land or properties are subject to further current valuations; which are then valid for three months.

 

10.          Thank the committee and congregation members from the St George & Prince Theodore Coptic Orthodox Church Liverpool for their patience in this matter and their overall contribution to Liverpool.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


 

 

City Economy and Growth Report

ITEM NO:       EGROW 01

FILE NO:        009939.2019

SUBJECT:     Adoption of Liverpool Heritage Strategy 2019-2023

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopt Liverpool Heritage Strategy 2019-2023.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes               Seconded: Clr Shelton 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Clr Hadchiti requested that he be recorded as voting against the motion.

 


19

ITEM NO:       EGROW 02

FILE NO:        324395.2018

SUBJECT:     Works in Kind and Planning Agreement Policy review

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Adopts the Revised Development Contributions, Land Dedication and Works in Kind Policy attached to this report (Attachment 1);

 

2.   Adopts the revised Planning Agreement Policy attached to this report (Attachment 2);

 

3.   Delegate authority to the CEO to make minor housekeeping alterations to both policies, as required; and

 

4.   Publish a notice in Liverpool Leader advising of its decision.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Rhodes               Seconded: Clr Harle 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       EGROW 03

FILE NO:        015970.2019

SUBJECT:     Flag and Banner Policy

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts the updated Flag and Banner Policy.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Karnib               Seconded: Clr Rhodes 

 

That the recommendation be adopted subject to the following change to item 10.1:

 

·         The words “Liverpool LEP 2008” be replaced with “current Liverpool LEP” so that 10.1 now reads:

 

            10.1    Flag and banner designs are subject to Council approval, which will be guided           by the current Liverpool LEP.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


21

ITEM NO:       EGROW 04

FILE NO:        019924.2019

SUBJECT:     Amendment to Part 1 Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 - New Chapter 24 Air Quality

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.            Endorses and places the draft amendment to the Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 on public exhibition for a minimum period of 28 days in accordance with Clause 18 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000; and

 

2.            Delegates to the CEO the finalisation of the draft Development Control Plan should no submissions be received; or reports back to Council the details of the submissions upon conclusion of the exhibition period.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

1.            Receives and notes the report and does not adopt the change as resolved   on 26 August 2015; and

 

2.            Refer the Development Control Plan to the Strategic Panel meeting by May 2019 so Councillors can contribute to resolving further updates and inclusions in the DCP.

 

Foreshadowed Motion:       Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion (moved by Clr Hadchiti) was declared CARRIED and

the Foreshadowed motion (moved by Clr Hagarty) lapsed.

 

Vote for:         Clr Ayyad

                        Clr Hadchiti

                        Clr Hadid

                        Clr Harle

                        Clr Karnib

                        Clr Rhodes

 

Vote against: Mayor Waller*

                        Clr Hagarty

                        Clr Kaliyanda

                        Clr Shelton

 

*Mayor Waller did not vote for or against the motion.  Therefore, in accordance with Clause 36.3 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice (as shown below), she is recorded as voting against the motion:

 

            “A Councillor who is present at a meeting of Council but who fails to vote on a motion put to the meeting is taken to have voted against the motion.”

                       

Note: Clr Balloot was not in the Chambers when this item was voted on.


23

ITEM NO:       EGROW 05

FILE NO:        026190.2019

SUBJECT:     Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 (Amendment 31) - Boarding House Development

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 (Amendment 31) to come into effect upon publication of the required notice in the local newspaper.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton                        Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 

Note: Clr Balloot was not in the Chambers when this item was voted on.

 


25

ITEM NO:       EGROW 06

FILE NO:        026741.2019

SUBJECT:     Proposed Amendment to Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 - Rezoning of land at 4-8 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Endorse the planning proposal to rezone 4-8 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool from B6 – Enterprise Corridor to B4 – Mixed Use, subject to a detailed site contamination investigation being prepared;

 

2.    Notes further discussions with the proponent will occur regarding a voluntary planning agreement offer for public domain improvement works and other transport related works that the proponent has outlined in their Urban Design report;

 

3.    Forwards the planning proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment, pursuant to Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, seeking a Gateway determination;

 

4.    Subject to Gateway determination, undertake public exhibition and community consultation in accordance with the conditions of the Gateway determination;

 

5.    Receive a further report on the outcomes of public exhibition and community consultation; and

 

6.    Notify the applicant of Council’s decision.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti            Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.    Endorse the planning proposal to rezone 4-8 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool from B6 – Enterprise Corridor to B4 – Mixed Use, subject to a detailed site contamination investigation being prepared;

 

2.    Noting the additional demands for community facilities and infrastructure arising from the increased density proposed, it is Council’s expectation that the LEP amendment would not proceed unless there are satisfactory arrangements to address these additional demands with appropriate public benefits; 

 

3.    Forwards the planning proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment, pursuant to Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, seeking a Gateway determination;

 

4.    Subject to Gateway determination, undertake public exhibition and community consultation in accordance with the conditions of the Gateway determination;

 

5.    Receive a further report on the outcomes of public exhibition and community consultation; and

 

6.    Notify the applicant of Council’s decision.

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

Vote for:         Mayor Waller

                        Clr Ayyad

                        Clr Hadchiti

                        Clr Hadid

                        Clr Harle

                        Clr Kaliyanda

                        Clr Rhodes

                         

Vote against: Clr Hagarty

                        Clr Karnib

                        Clr Shelton

 

Note: Clr Balloot was not in the Chambers when this item was voted on.

 


27

ITEM NO:       EGROW 07

FILE NO:        027246.2019

SUBJECT:     Post exhibition report Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 - Draft Amendment 54 (Reclassification of Community Land and rezoning of Part Lot 10 DP 1162812) Hammondville Park, Hammondville

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Note the Gateway determination for draft Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 54) and the results of public exhibition and community consultation;

 

2.    Support the making of Amendment 54 and forward the planning proposal and supporting documentation to the Department of Planning and Environment for finalisation; and

 

3.      Advise those who made a submission and attended the public hearing of Council’s decision.

 

Mayor Waller called a recess of Council at 7.43pm.

 

Mayor Waller reopened the Council meeting at 7.49pm with all Councillors present except Clr Ayyad.

 

Clr Ayyad arrived at 7.51pm

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadid                Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That the matter be deferred until Council receives an economic assessment.

 

Vote for          Clr Ayyad

                        Clr Hadid

                        Clr Shelton

                       

 

Vote against: Mayor Waller*

                        Clr Hadchiti

                        Clr Hagarty

                        Clr Harle

                        Clr Kaliyanda 

                        Clr Karnib

                        Clr Rhodes

 

 

The above motion was LOST.

 

*Mayor Waller did not vote for or against the motion.  Therefore, in accordance with Clause 36.3 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice (as shown below), she is recorded as voting against the motion:

 

            “A Councillor who is present at a meeting of Council but who fails to vote on a motion put to the meeting is taken to have voted against the motion.”

                       

 

Note: Clr Balloot was not in the Chambers when this item was voted on

 

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti            Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

1.            Note the Gateway determination for draft Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 54) and the results of public exhibition and community consultation;

 

2.            Support the making of Amendment 54, with the B6 zone removed and replaced in its entirety with RE2 and incorporate this change in a revised planning proposal and forward to the Department of Planning and Environment for finalisation; and

 

3.            Advise those who made a submission and attended the public hearing of Council’s decision.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion (moved by Clr Hadchiti) was declared CARRIED.

 

Vote for:        Mayor Waller

                        Clr Ayyad

                        Clr Hadchiti

                        Clr Hadid

                        Clr Hagarty

                        Clr Harle

                        Clr Kaliyanda

                        Clr Karnib

                        Clr Rhodes

 

Vote against:  Clr Shelton

 

Note: Clr Balloot was not in the Chambers when this item was voted on.

 


29

ITEM NO:       EGROW 08

FILE NO:        029692.2019

SUBJECT:     Responses to Advocacy, Liverpool's Time is Now

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receive and note this report.

 

 

After Clr Hadchiti’s motion was moved, Clr Kaliyanda declared a pecuniary interest and left the Chambers as she is a candidate for the upcoming State election and the motion refers to election policy. 

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

  1. Note that Infrastructure Australia has listed Sydney Metro City & Southwest as a ‘High Priority Project’.

 

2.    Note that the Sydney Metro City & Southwest will provide in part:

a.      48 extra services in peak on the Airport & South line.

b.      72 extra services for each of the Western, Blue Mountains, Inner West lines & Leppington lines.

 

  1. Note that a survey on Liverpool Listens was undertaken asking ‘Do you support a metro rail extension from Bankstown to Liverpool?’ which attracted 182 respondents of which 161 responded ‘yes’ and 21 ‘no’.

 

  1. Note the media release issued by Council on the 23rd of October 2017 which in part states:

 

            “Liverpool is missing out again,” said Liverpool City Council CEO Kiersten Fishburn.

            “People can’t be made to wait decades for the infrastructure they need now. These      are critical rail links which will make an enormous difference to the quality of people’s         lives – connecting people with jobs.

            Already, Liverpool commuters are struggling with one of the slowest lines in Sydney,   Ms Fishburn said.

            “We desperately need express services to get people to work in reasonable time.         Many residents are losing up to three hours a day commuting,” she said.

            “Mayor Wendy Waller and the councillors want the best for the city’s residents which   is why we have worked so hard on this issue,” she said.

            “We have run surveys, a petition, made expert submissions and met with countless     bureaucrats and politicians. We will not stop standing up for the people of Liverpool         and I would encourage members of the community to let the NSW Government know     what they think.”

  1. Note the SMH report on the 14th of October 2015 headed ‘Foley proposes Bankstown metro extension to Liverpool, Badgerys Creek which in part states ‘The state opposition is calling on the government to consider extending the Bankstown line, planned to be converted to a "metro" rail link, in a straight line to Liverpool and then perhaps beyond to Badgerys Creek.

 

  1. Note that after extensive lobbying by Council the State Government included the Metro from Bankstown to Liverpool in their plans.

 

  1. Note that the State Labor Leader vowed mid February 2019 to spend $8 billion to "fast-track" a new metro train line between Parramatta and the central city with some of the funds coming from cancelling the Sydney Metro City & Southwest.

 

  1. Note that Liverpool is the Gateway to the Southwest, the third CBD and is sick of having much needed funds and links diverted to improve Parramatta.

 

  1. Direct the CEO to immediately lobby the State Opposition Leader in all ways possible requesting that this transport project is not cancelled should his Party be elected to govern.

 

  1. Direct the CEO to immediately commence a community awareness campaign using all means possible, not limited to print and social, voicing our outrage on the promise by the State Opposition Leader to cancel the Sydney Metro City & Southwest, should his party be elected to govern, highlighting the benefits this project would bring to our residents.

 

  1. Direct the CEO to use funds from the Unrestricted Reserves to ensure our message is heard loud and clear.

 

12.  Lobby for the Bankstown Metro Line to go to Liverpool.

 

Clr Hagarty left the Chambers at 8.03pm.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Division called:

 

Vote for:        Clr Ayyad                

                        Clr Hadchiti

                        Clr Hadid

                        Clr Harle

                        Clr Rhodes

 

Vote against: Mayor Waller

                        Clr Karnib

                        Clr Shelton

 

Note: Clrs Kaliyanda, Hagarty and Balloot were not in the Chambers when this item was being voted on.

 

Clr Hagarty returned to the Chambers at 8.05pm.


31

 

Chief Executive Officer Report

 

ITEM NO:       CEO 01

FILE NO:        021986.2019

SUBJECT:     Biannual Progress Report July – December 2018

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council notes and receives the Biannual Progress Report which outlines the progress of the actions detailed in the Delivery Program and Operational Plan 2018-19.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti            Seconded: Clr Rhodes 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


Clr Kaliyanda returned to the Chambers at 8.07pm.

 

City Community and Culture Report

 

ITEM NO:       COM 01

FILE NO:        012112.2019

SUBJECT:     Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council endorses the funding recommendation of $22,600 (GST exclusive) under the Corporate Sponsorship (Outgoing) Program for the following projects:

 

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Charming Asia Association

2019 “Charming Asia” Lunar Carnival

$10,000

Liverpool Neighbourhood Connections

Junior Top Blokes Mentoring Program

$8,700

Police Citizens Youth Club NSW

2019 Time4Kids Family Fun Day

$3,900

 

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton                        Seconded: Clr Karnib

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


33

ITEM NO:       COM 02

FILE NO:        029777.2019

SUBJECT:     Access to Facilities in Hot Weather and Measures to Cool the City

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives this report and notes that a further report will be presented to Council in May 2019.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton             Seconded: Clr Karnib 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


 

City Corporate Report

 

ITEM NO:       CORP 01

FILE NO:        342123.2018

SUBJECT:     Delegations Register - Delegation to CEO

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Note that the Chief Executive Officer exercises the functions, role and delegations of the “General Manager” under the Local Government Act 1993;

 

2.   Delegate to the Chief Executive Officer the delegations set out in the Delegations to the Chief Executive Officer in Attachment 1 to this report;

 

3.   Authorise the Mayor to sign the Instrument of Delegation to the Chief Executive Officer; and

 

4.   Confirm Council’s delegations for any functions or powers conferred or imposed on Council by or under any legislation in accordance with section 22 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Karnib

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Clr Hadchiti asked that he be recorded as voting against this motion.

 


35

ITEM NO:       CORP 02

FILE NO:        020035.2019

SUBJECT:     Budget Review - December 2018

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the report; and

 

2.    Approves the identified budget variations in accordance with this report.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton               Seconded: Clr Rhodes 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       CORP 03

FILE NO:        022902.2019

SUBJECT:     Investment Report January 2019

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


37

ITEM NO:       CORP 04

FILE NO:        030125.2019

SUBJECT:     Legal Services Policy

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council approve and adopt the Legal Services Policy, included as Attachment 1.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Harle 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       CORP 05

FILE NO:        032438.2019

SUBJECT:     Zero Based Budget

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the report concerning zero-based budgeting.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti            Seconded: Clr Rhodes 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


39

 

City Presentation Report

 

ITEM NO:       PRES 01

FILE NO:        026018.2019

SUBJECT:     Replacement of bins in Macquarie Mall

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the costs outlined in this report.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti                      Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.      Receives and notes the costs outlined in this report and approves the expenditure; and

 

2.      Investigate the opportunity to recycle the cigarette butts into building products.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED. 

 

 


43

 

Committee Reports

 

ITEM NO:       CTTE 01

FILE NO:        025057.2019

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee Meeting

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts the following recommendations of the Committee:

 

1.       Item 1 – Lucas Avenue, Moorebank, proposed pedestrian crossing facility

Installation of a pedestrian refuge in Lucas Avenue, Moorebank. Location of the pedestrian refuge is to be decided in consultation with the Nuwarra Public School.

 

2.       Item 2 – Moore Street, Liverpool, changes to the existing bus transit lane

 

·   ‘No Right Turn’ restriction for westbound traffic on Moore Street at Bigge Street intersection.

·   Extension of the existing 10m ‘No Stopping’ restriction to 20m and additional 10m ‘No Parking’ restriction on Moore Street on the westbound approach to its intersection with Bathurst Street.

 

3.       Item 3 – Proposed RMS pinch point program works in the Liverpool LGA

 

·   The sign and linemarking scheme of the proposed intersection improvements as indicated in Attachments 3.1 to 3.10 of the minutes:

·   Hoxton Park Road/Whitford Road/Spire Court intersection, Hinchinbrook, with:

a)      Installation of edgeline marking along the western side of Whitford Road, between Hoxton Park Road and Topnot Avenue to demarcate the traffic lane and kerbside parking lane.

b)      Installation of ‘50’ numerical pavement marking near the proposed speed limit sign.

 

4.       Item 4 – Mannow Avenue and Second Avenue, West Hoxton – Proposed roundabout

 

Installation of a roundabout at the intersection of Mannow Avenue and Second Avenue, West Hoxton.

 

5.       Item 5 – Memorial Avenue, Liverpool – Traffic management changes

 

·   The installation of:

a)      A 0.5m wide median island along Memorial Avenue between Copeland Street and Bathurst Street;

b)      Pedestrian refuges on Castlereagh Street approaches to Memorial Avenue; and

c)      Installation of a raised threshold at the existing marked pedestrian crossing across the left-turn slip lane off Copeland Street.

·   The RMS be requested to install a ‘Bus Zone’ along the eastern side of the Hume Highway, south of Memorial Avenue.

·   The existing ‘Bus Zone’ on Memorial Avenue, west of Castlereagh Street, be removed following decommissioning of the existing bus stop.

 

6.       Item 6 - Speeding Concerns in the Liverpool LGA

 

·    Installation of a raised threshold across Flynn Avenue between Monkton Avenue and Bonython Avenue.

·    Undertake speed classification along Walder Road and Feodore Drive and investigate the need for additional traffic calming devices.

·    The NSW Police Force be requested to undertake appropriate enforcement of speeding along Feodore Drive, Flynn Avenue, Walder Road and the surrounding streets.

 

7.       Item 7 - Items approved under Delegated Authority

 

Notes the minor traffic facilities approved under delegated authority.

 

8.       Item 8 - Kingsbury Road and Peronne Road, Edmondson Park - Proposed Intersection Treatment

·    Notes the intersection change approved under delegated authority.

·    Undertakes traffic surveys along both streets to consider the need for traffic calming devices, including a roundabout.

 

9.       Item 9 - Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee Charter update

 

Notes the updated Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee Charter.

 

 

 

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council adopts the following recommendations of the Committee: (Note: Point 10 was added at the 27 February 2019 Council meeting):

 

1.       Item 1 – Lucas Avenue, Moorebank, proposed pedestrian crossing facility

Installation of a pedestrian refuge in Lucas Avenue, Moorebank. Location of the pedestrian refuge is to be decided in consultation with the Nuwarra Public School.

 

2.       Item 2 – Moore Street, Liverpool, changes to the existing bus transit lane

 

·   ‘No Right Turn’ restriction for westbound traffic on Moore Street at Bigge Street intersection.

·   Extension of the existing 10m ‘No Stopping’ restriction to 20m and additional 10m ‘No Parking’ restriction on Moore Street on the westbound approach to its intersection with Bathurst Street.

 

3.       Item 3 – Proposed RMS pinch point program works in the Liverpool LGA

 

·   The sign and linemarking scheme of the proposed intersection improvements as indicated in Attachments 3.1 to 3.10 of the minutes:

·   Hoxton Park Road/Whitford Road/Spire Court intersection, Hinchinbrook, with:

a)      Installation of edgeline marking along the western side of Whitford Road, between Hoxton Park Road and Topnot Avenue to demarcate the traffic lane and kerbside parking lane.

b)      Installation of ‘50’ numerical pavement marking near the proposed speed limit sign.

 

4.       Item 4 – Mannow Avenue and Second Avenue, West Hoxton – Proposed roundabout

 

Installation of a roundabout at the intersection of Mannow Avenue and Second Avenue, West Hoxton.

 

5.       Item 5 – Memorial Avenue, Liverpool – Traffic management changes

 

·   The installation of:

a)      A 0.5m wide median island along Memorial Avenue between Copeland Street and Bathurst Street;

b)      Pedestrian refuges on Castlereagh Street approaches to Memorial Avenue; and

c)      Installation of a raised threshold at the existing marked pedestrian crossing across the left-turn slip lane off Copeland Street.

·   The RMS be requested to install a ‘Bus Zone’ along the eastern side of the Hume Highway, south of Memorial Avenue.

·   The existing ‘Bus Zone’ on Memorial Avenue, west of Castlereagh Street, be removed following decommissioning of the existing bus stop.

 

6.       Item 6 - Speeding Concerns in the Liverpool LGA

 

·    Installation of a raised threshold across Flynn Avenue between Monkton Avenue and Bonython Avenue.

·    Undertake speed classification along Walder Road and Feodore Drive and investigate the need for additional traffic calming devices.

·    The NSW Police Force be requested to undertake appropriate enforcement of speeding along Feodore Drive, Flynn Avenue, Walder Road and the surrounding streets.

 

7.       Item 7 - Items approved under Delegated Authority

 

Notes the minor traffic facilities approved under delegated authority.

 

8.       Item 8 - Kingsbury Road and Peronne Road, Edmondson Park - Proposed Intersection Treatment

·    Notes the intersection change approved under delegated authority.

·    Undertakes traffic surveys along both streets to consider the need for traffic calming devices, including a roundabout.

 

9.       Item 9 - Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee Charter update

 

Notes the updated Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee Charter.

 

10.      This Committee notes the advice from the RMS and recommends that Council write to the RMS requesting consideration be given to a heavy vehicle inspection bay, similar to bays recently installed on Narellan Road, and those existing on the Northern Road and other such roads in Metropolitan Sydney.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 02

FILE NO:        029712.2019

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee Meeting held 1 February 2019

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee Meeting held on 1 February 2019;

 

2.    Endorse the recommendations in the Minutes; and

 

3.    Adopt the amended Civic Advisory Committee Charter attached to the report.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee Meeting held on 1 February 2019;

 

2.    Note the recommendations in the Minutes; and

 

3.    Undertakes a review of the Charter and Membership in September.

 

 

Foreshadowed motion:       Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

1.    Receives and notes the Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee Meeting held on 1 February 2019;

 

2.    Note the recommendations in the Minutes; and

 

3.    Adopt the amended Civic Advisory Committee Charter attached to the report.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion (moved by Clr Hagarty) was declared LOST. The Foreshadowed motion (moved by Clr Hadchiti) then became the Motion and on being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Clr Shelton asked that he be recorded as voting against the adopted motion (moved by Clr Hadchiti).

 


45

 

Questions with Notice

 

ITEM NO:       QWN 01

FILE NO:        026486.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Kaliyanda - Single Use Plastics Reduction

 

Please address the following:

 

Does Council:

 

1.      Include the reduction of single use plastics, such as straws, balloons and plastic bags, within its waste education program?

 

Council’s waste education programs focus on household waste, particularly the waste hierarchy- Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. Waste reduction is discussed as the most desirable waste management action, encouraging waste avoidance of as much waste as possible, including but not limited to single use plastics.

 

In 2018 over 2,100 residents participated in a waste education workshop/event.

 

                                                    

2.      How does this program interact with local businesses in the area, particularly those within the hospitality sector?

Council endorses the Bin Trim Program, a free education program for local businesses under the Environmental Protection Agency. The Bin Trim program provides free help and support to NSW businesses to maximise their recycling and minimise their waste to landfill and may also help save time and money, while considering the environment. This program educates local business on reuse and recycling.

3.      Have a policy or focus of reducing use of these plastics during Council run or sponsored events?

 

There has been a cross-departmental working group running since late last year on the issue of single-use plastics.

We are looking at how the organisation can reduce the use of plastic. The initial focus is internal – with a view to a more outward focus once our own plastic is reduced.

 

Recently, we have been successful in encouraging staff to supply their own dishware for barbecue events held at Moore Street and Rose Street locations

We are also looking at how we can encourage staff to reduce plastic use daily through container re-use, plus how we can manage sustainable procurement (ie responsibly sourced items)

Currently, the working group is discussing policy development in this area.

 

 

4.      Actively seek funding that could assist in reducing our waste footprint?

 

Council actively seeks funding to assist with waste reduction. A good example being the Love Food Hate Waste program funded by the Environmental Protection Agency. This education program focuses on reducing food waste, encourages environmentally friendly food storage and promotes avoidance of single-use plastics; i.e. cling-wrap and ziplock bags. 

 


47

ITEM NO:       QWN 02

FILE NO:        036986.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Small Streets

 

 

Background

 

Liverpool has many small suburban streets. When vehicles park on the verge in these streets they are fined. When they park in these small streets, occasionally garbage trucks are unable to pass.

 

Please address the following:

 

What is the minimum width a street needs to be for a garbage truck to pass:

·      With no cars parked in it?

·      If a car is parked on one side?

·      If cars are parked on either side?

 

 

A response to these Questions with Notice will be provided in the 27th March 2019 Council Business Papers.

 


PRESENTATIONS BY COUNCILLORS

 

Nil.

 

Notices of Motion

 

ITEM NO:       NOM 01

FILE NO:        028916.2019

SUBJECT:     Personnel Matters – Council In Closed Session

 

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (Submitted by Clr Hadchiti)

 

That Council under Section 10A(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 1993 go into closed session at the conclusion of other items to discuss personnel matters concerning particular individuals (other than Councillors).

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti                      Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That Council under Section 10A(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 1993 go into closed session at the conclusion of other items to discuss personnel matters concerning particular individuals (other than Councillors).

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


49

ITEM NO:       NOM 02

FILE NO:        036947.2019

SUBJECT:     Clean Air For Liverpool

 

BACKGROUND

 

Earlier this month Doctors for the Environment (DEA) released a report entitled 'Clean Air for New South Wales: 2018 Update'. 

 

The report found that fine and coarse particle air pollution was getting worse across the State. Liverpool was the worst place in New South Wales for fine particle air pollution, measuring 10.1 micrograms per cubic metre of air.

 

Fine particle air pollution is linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, low birth weight for babies, and restricted lung growth in children.

 

With the Moorebank Intermodal on the way and Western Sydney Airport set to open without a fuel line, the amount of diesel fuelled trucks in our LGA is set to substantially increase and with it, fine particle air pollution.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Hagarty)

 

That Council:

 

1.   Report back within 6 months on the most effective ways to:

·      Monitor and report on air quality in the Liverpool LGA.

·      Improve air quality in the Liverpool LGA.

·      Fund these activities (e.g. State or Federal funding).

 

2.   Write to the relevant State and Federal Ministers expressing Council's concerns about the report’s findings and seek responses to the report’s recommendations, namely:

·      Modernising coal power stations to require the capture of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide.

·      Better pollution checks to remove high air pollution emitting vehicles from our roads.

·      Higher fees for the existing Load Based Licensing system for industry, so that they better reflect the health costs imposed on the community.

·      Restrictions on the installation and use of wood fired heaters in urban areas.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hagarty               Seconded: Clr Rhodes 

 

That Council:

 

1.   Report back within 6 months on the most effective ways to:

·      Monitor and report on air quality in the Liverpool LGA.

·      Improve air quality in the Liverpool LGA.

·      Fund these activities (e.g. State or Federal funding).

 

2.   Write to the relevant State and Federal Ministers expressing Council's concerns about the report’s findings and seek responses to the report’s recommendations, namely:

·      Modernising coal power stations to require the capture of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide.

·      Better pollution checks to remove high air pollution emitting vehicles from our roads.

·      Higher fees for the existing Load Based Licensing system for industry, so that they better reflect the health costs imposed on the community.

·      Restrictions on the installation and use of wood fired heaters in urban areas.

 

3.      Investigate potential revisions to the DCP that:

 

·           Investigate obligatory requirements to install equipment and procedures to capture air quality data on an hourly basis that is to be available to Council upon request for all new manufacturing facilities that risk emitting pollutants into the air.

 

·           All existing manufacturing facilities who risk air quality to have installed within 5 years equipment and procedure to capture the air quality data on an hourly basis and for that to be available to Council upon request.

 

4.      Investigate the number of trees required to ensure the Liverpool LGA is carbon neutral.

 

5.     Write to all MP’s State and Federal to support changes to the legislation that:

 

·           Will ensure that all manufacturing facilities at risk of emitting air pollutants must install air monitoring equipment and procedure to capture data on an hourly basis that is to be available to the EPA and Councils upon request with statutory limits that are enforceable through stringent fines or possible closure of operation.

 

·           Remove cars that do not comply with current emission regulations with the exception of vintage registered vehicles, in order to take high polluting vehicles off the road.

 

·           Introduce tax initiatives to encourage the up-take of electric powered vehicles in order to phase out the reliance on fossil fuels.

 

 

Foreshadowed motion:      Moved: Clr Hadchiti              Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council:

1.      Engages a suitably qualified consultant to peer review the air quality report by Dr Ben Altwood, whilst incorporating other data from local reports and Council’s air quality monitoring data, and report these findings back to the Intermodal Committee.

 

2.      Investigate the number of trees required to ensure the Liverpool LGA is carbon neutral.

 

3.      Report back within 6 months on the most effective ways to:

·           Monitor and report on air quality in the Liverpool LGA.

·           Improve air quality in the Liverpool LGA.

·           Fund these activities (e.g. State or Federal funding).

 

On being put to the meeting the motion (moved by Clr Hagarty) was declared CARRIED and the Foreshadowed Motion (moved by Clr Hadchiti) therefore lapsed.

 

Clr Hadchiti asked that he be recorded as voting against the motion.


53

ITEM NO:       NOM 04

FILE NO:        037277.2019

SUBJECT:     Inclusion of all Correspondence in and out from CEO's and Mayor's Office, Council Managers and Councillors into the Monthly Council Agenda

 

BACKGROUND

 

In previous meetings of Liverpool Council it was a meeting procedure to include all correspondence in and out of the CEO Office.

 

This transparent and honest noting of all correspondence assisted Council in addressing all issues of concern as well as fully informing all councillors and constituents of issues before Council.

 

Currently there is no correspondence reporting from the Mayor’s office and although the CEO does a CEO report to all Councillors, that information is considered confidential and so is not reported to constituents and there is no accountability that all correspondence received or sent is being reported on.

 

In instances where the correspondence is considered to be confidential those items would be declared in the confidential section of each meeting.

 

The tabling of all Council correspondence will restore the opportunity for all councillors to be fully informed and enable them to better perform with due diligence their representation of the local community for which they were elected to do.

 

The inclusion of all correspondence in and out of Council is in the best interest of honesty, transparency it is in the best interest of the local community and is in the best interest of better engagement practice with all councillors and the constituents they were elected to serve.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Rhodes)

 

That Council:

 

1.   Reinstitute the process of reporting to Council those items and matters currently contained within the Correspondence Register in the weekly CEO Update to councillors, including those items of correspondence directed to be sent by resolution of Council, and any relevant replies received;

 

 

 

 

 

2.   Also report the following additional items of correspondence to Council on a monthly basis:

a.    Circulars from the OLG pertaining to matters of strategic importance to the Council;

b.    Ministerial directions relating to matters if strategic importance to the Council.

 

3.   Ensure that any item reported to Council as a result of this motion that contains confidential information, or personal/private information, be reported in the confidential section of the Council meeting agenda.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes     Seconded: Clr Harle 

 

That Council:

 

1.   Reinstitute the process of reporting to Council those items and matters currently contained within the Correspondence Register in the weekly CEO Update to councillors, including those items of correspondence directed to be sent by resolution of Council, and any relevant replies received;

 

2.   Also report the following additional items of correspondence to Council on a monthly basis:

 

a.    Circulars from the OLG pertaining to matters of strategic importance to the Council;

b.    Ministerial directions relating to matters if strategic importance to the Council.

 

3.   Ensure that any item reported to Council as a result of this motion that contains confidential information, or personal/private information, be reported in the confidential section of the Council meeting agenda.

 

Foreshadowed motion:       Moved:  Clr Hadchiti            Seconded: Clr Hagarty

 

That Council receives and notes the report.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion (moved by Clr Rhodes) was declared LOST. The Foreshadowed Motion (moved by Clr Hadchiti) then became the Motion and on being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED

 

Division called (for the motion moved by Clr Rhodes):

 

Vote for:        Clr Harle

                        Clr Rhodes

                        Clr Shelton

 

 

Vote against: Mayor Waller

                        Clr Ayyad

                        Clr Hadchiti

                        Clr Hadid

                        Clr Hagarty

                        Clr Karnib

                        Clr Kaliyanda

 

Note: Clr Balloot was not in the Chambers when this item was voted on.

   


55

Clr Rhodes left the Chambers at 9.03pm.

 

Confidential Items

ITEM NO:       CONF 01

FILE NO:        327458.2018

SUBJECT:     BMX Track Powell Park - unauthorised importation of contaminated waste

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council note the report concerning the remediation of contaminated fill at Powell Park.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti           Seconded: Clr Hagarty

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


57

ITEM NO:       CONF 02

FILE NO:        018361.2019

SUBJECT:     Review of Four Day Week for Outdoor Staff

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti                      Seconded: Clr Karnib

 

That this matter be considered at the end of this meeting in Closed Session pursuant to the provisions of Section 10A(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 1993 because it contains personnel matters concerning particular individuals (other than Councillors).

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


 

Clr Rhodes returned to the Chambers at 9.05pm.

ITEM NO:       CONF 03

FILE NO:        032887.2019

SUBJECT:     Closing and Transfer of a Temporary Road that is part of the Bernera Road/Croatia Avenue extension at Edmondson Park.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.       Close the temporary public road identified as Lot 1 in DP 1129337 located on Croatia Avenue at the intersection with Camden Valley, Edmondson Park;

 

2.       Transfer the closed temporary public road identified as Lot 1 in DP 1129337 to the Original Subdivider (Owner) or the Original Subdivider’s (Owner’s) successor in title;

 

3.       Authorises its Delegated Officer/s to execute any documentation, under Power of Attorney, necessary to give effect to this decision; and

 

4.       Keeps confidential this Report pursuant to the provisions of Section 10(A)(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993 as it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty                       Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


59

ITEM NO:       CONF 04

FILE NO:        036969.2019

SUBJECT:     Carl Wulff

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Hadchiti

That this item be considered at the end of the meeting in Closed Session pursuant to the provisions of S10A(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 1993 because it contains personnel matters concerning particular individuals (other than Councillors)

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.


 

Prior to moving into Closed Session, the Mayor adjourned the meeting for a recess at 9.06pm.

COUNCIL IN CLOSED SESSION

Mayor Waller reopened the meeting at 9.15pm in Closed Session to consider items CONF 02 (Review of Four Day Week for Outdoor Staff), CONF 04 (Carl Wulff) and NOM 01 (Personnel Matters – Council in Closed Session) pursuant to the provisions of S10(A)(2) (a) of the Local Government Act 1993 because the items contain personnel matters concerning particular individuals (other than Councillors)

 

ITEM NO:       CONF 02

FILE NO:        018361.2019

SUBJECT:     Review of Four Day Week for Outdoor Staff

 

Clr Hadid left the Chambers at 9.20pm.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti                      Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council receive and note the report and allocate adequate resources to allow the CEO to establish Key Performance Indicators in conjunction with the four day working week arrangement.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 

Note: Clrs Hadid and Balloot were not in the Chambers when this item was voted on.

 

Clr Hadid returned to the Chambers at 9.25pm.

 


60

ITEM NO:       CONF 04

FILE NO:        036969.2019

SUBJECT:     Carl Wulff

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That Council receive and note the verbal report of the CEO.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       NOM 01

FILE NO:        028916.2019

SUBJECT:     Personnel Matters – Council In Closed Session

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty                       Seconded: Clr Hadchiti 

 

That Council receive and note the verbal report made by the CEO.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Hadchiti

 

That Council move back into Open Session.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Council moved back into Open Session at 10.53pm.

 

Mayor Waller then read out the motions which were passed in Closed Session relating to CONF 02, CONF 04 and NOM 01 (as shown on pages 52, 53 and 54).


 

 

 

THE MEETING CLOSED AT 10.54pm.

 

 

<Signature>

Name: Wendy Waller

Title:    Mayor

Date:    27 March 2019

I have authorised a stamp bearing my signature to be affixed to the pages of the Minutes of the Council Meeting held on  27 February 2019. I confirm that Council has adopted these Minutes as a true and accurate record of the meeting.

 

   


63

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

Notices of Motion Of Rescission

 

NOMR 01

Rescission of EGROW 08 Responses to Advocacy, Liverpool's Time is Now from the Council meeting of 27 February 2019

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

059687.2019

 

 

NOTICE OF MOTION OF RESCISSION

 

We the undersigned move a rescission motion to rescind item EGROW 08 Responses to Advocacy, Liverpool’s Time is Now (as shown below) that was passed at the Ordinary Council Meeting held on Wednesday 27 February 2019.

 

That Council:

 

1.   Note that Infrastructure Australia has listed Sydney Metro City & Southwest as a ‘High Priority Project’.

 

2.   Note that the Sydney Metro City & Southwest will provide in part:

a.    48 extra services in peak on the Airport & South line.

b.    72 extra services for each of the Western, Blue Mountains, Inner West lines & Leppington lines.

 

3.   Note that a survey on Liverpool Listens was undertaken asking ‘Do you support a metro rail extension from Bankstown to Liverpool?’ which attracted 182 respondents of which 161 responded ‘yes’ and 21 ‘no’.

 

4.   Note the media release issued by Council on the 23rd of October 2017 which in part states:

 

            “Liverpool is missing out again,” said Liverpool City Council CEO Kiersten Fishburn.

            “People can’t be made to wait decades for the infrastructure they need now. These      are critical rail links which will make an enormous difference to the quality of people’s         lives – connecting people with jobs.

            Already, Liverpool commuters are struggling with one of the slowest lines in Sydney,   Ms Fishburn said.

            “We desperately need express services to get people to work in reasonable time.         Many residents are losing up to three hours a day commuting,” she said.

            “Mayor Wendy Waller and the councillors want the best for the city’s residents which   is why we have worked so hard on this issue,” she said.

            “We have run surveys, a petition, made expert submissions and met with countless     bureaucrats and politicians. We will not stop standing up for the people of Liverpool         and I would encourage members of the community to let the NSW Government know     what they think.”

5.   Note the SMH report on the 14th of October 2015 headed ‘Foley proposes Bankstown metro extension to Liverpool, Badgerys Creek which in part states ‘The state opposition is calling on the government to consider extending the Bankstown line, planned to be converted to a "metro" rail link, in a straight line to Liverpool and then perhaps beyond to Badgerys Creek.

 

6.   Note that after extensive lobbying by Council the State Government included the Metro from Bankstown to Liverpool in their plans.

 

7.   Note that the State Labor Leader vowed mid February 2019 to spend $8 billion to "fast-track" a new metro train line between Parramatta and the central city with some of the funds coming from cancelling the Sydney Metro City & Southwest.

 

8.   Note that Liverpool is the Gateway to the Southwest, the third CBD and is sick of having much needed funds and links diverted to improve Parramatta.

 

9.   Direct the CEO to immediately lobby the State Opposition Leader in all ways possible requesting that this transport project is not cancelled should his Party be elected to govern.

 

10. Direct the CEO to immediately commence a community awareness campaign using all means possible, not limited to print and social, voicing our outrage on the promise by the State Opposition Leader to cancel the Sydney Metro City & Southwest, should his party be elected to govern, highlighting the benefits this project would bring to our residents.

 

11. Direct the CEO to use funds from the Unrestricted Reserves to ensure our message is heard loud and clear.

 

12. Lobby for the Bankstown Metro Line to go to Liverpool.

 

Signed:

Clr Hagarty

Clr Shelton

Mayor Waller

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil   


69

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 01

Adoption of International Trade Engagement Strategy

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Create an attractive environment for investment

File Ref

030881.2019

Report By

Samantha Strachan - Acting Business Liaison Officer

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council, in partnership with Australian Business Consulting & Solutions (ABCS), a division of the NSW Business Chamber, developed a draft International Trade Engagement Strategy (‘the strategy’) to support the delivery of the Liverpool Community Strategic Plan 2027 under ‘Generating Opportunity’.

 

The strategy outlines findings and actions for Council to undertake that will enhance Liverpool’s international competitiveness and stimulate regional growth in preparation for the launch of the Western Sydney International (Nancy-Bird Walton) Airport in 2026.

 

The development of the strategy involved a stakeholder workshop, local business surveys and interviews and analysis of international markets using trade and export data from Federal and State government agencies.

 

This report recommends endorsing the International Trade Engagement Strategy for public exhibition and consider resources for a new trade-focussed role to implement the recommendations contained in the strategy, as part of the 2019/2020 budget preparation.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1.       Endorse the International Trade Engagement Strategy for public exhibition;

2.       Delegate to the CEO to finalise the strategy if no submissions are received, or report back to the Council the details of any submissions upon conclusion of exhibition;

3.       Consider resources and funding requirements as part of the preparation of the 2019/2020 budget; and

4.       Directs the CEO to report to Council on the progress of this initiative.

 


 

REPORT

 

Background

 

The Western Sydney International (Nancy-Bird Walton) Airport (WSI), wholly located within the Liverpool LGA, will present many economic and social opportunities for the region. The airport will enable Liverpool’s established business community greater access to international markets. Liverpool currently has a low percentage of exports representing an opportunity to work with local businesses through capability building programs for product development and improved access to new markets.

 

International Trade Engagement Strategy

 

The strategy is underpinned by the quadruple bottom line approach of Liverpool’s Community Strategic Plan particularly Direction 3: Generating Opportunity. The strategy will assist Council in meeting its commitment to:

·    attract businesses for economic growth and employment opportunities; and

·    create an attractive environment for investment.

 

In preparation for the strategy, a stakeholder workshop, more than forty surveys and local business interviews, and an analysis of international markets was conducted to determine findings.

 

The stakeholder workshop was attended by senior officers from Liverpool Hospital, Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Western Sydney University, University of Wollongong, Southern Strength Advanced Manufacturing Network, Liverpool Chamber of Commerce, South West Sydney Local Health District and Regional Development Australia.

 

Over forty local businesses were interviewed to analyse their export capability, trade strengths and weaknesses, and support required to be competitive in a global market.

 

International market research was conducted using a Success Probability Matrix to analyse the maturity of the sector, complexity of the business environment, competitiveness of the sector and cultural ease of engagement.

 

Research revealed that the export landscape in Liverpool is immature and Liverpool City Council has a unique opportunity to develop trade support pillars which will attract business to the region, create momentum for international market expansion and brand the region as a global destination.

 

The strategy includes:

·    A Statement of Ambition for Council’s vision to be a competitive global location;

·    Key capability areas of the Liverpool economy;

·    Strategic recommendations to achieve Council’s vision for international engagement;

·    Identification of priority offshore markets that correlate with Liverpool’s key capability areas;

·    Long and short term actions as they relate to capacity development of local businesses, trade delegations and strategic partnership development; and

·    Linkages to Council’s Economic Development Strategy 2019 – 2029 and Our Home, Liverpool 2027 - Community Strategic Plan.

 

The intended outcomes of the International Trade Engagement Strategy include:

·    Development of a brand identity that connects the city to an easy place to do business;

·    Achievement of economic growth targets that result in GDP increase;

·    Harnessing existing sector excellence in health and transportation for global recognition;

·    Attraction of businesses that are innovative including advanced manufacturing, research and education;

·    Facilitating stimulating career pathways from study to work; and

·    Development of the transport and logistics sector to support a green and sustainable airport.

 

The strategy outlines four areas of focus which have a number of recommended actions outlined below:

 

1.   Development of economic strengths in the region

·      Map out a potential trade ecosystem for the next decade

·      Develop business attraction strategies for companies to set up in the region

 

2.   Building of a regional identity to inspire local business action

·      Develop an international marketing strategy

·      Promote a regional identity in identified markets

·      Develop a live, work and play narrative to support business attraction

 

3.   Development of capacity building programs

·      Foster a community of trade experts

·      Create an online export and trade related hub

·      Launch an events program

·      Identify and target ‘born global’ companies (businesses specifically created to go international)

 

4.   Creation of international connections for the local community

·      Build and maintain strong collaborative relationships with identified markets

·      Provide practical connections to potential buyers in identified markets

·      Collaborate with other Western Sydney Councils and the Western Sydney Investment Attraction Office for a broader global reach

 

Conclusion

 

If adopted following public exhibition, the strategy will be managed and delivered by the City Economy Unit. Successful implementation of the strategies outlined and recommended actions would require a full-time resource and an activation budget to deliver the recommended actions.

 

The Officer would work alongside the Western Sydney Investment Attraction Office and other Western Sydney City Deal councils to develop a framework to position Liverpool and the Western Parkland City as a competitive, global trade destination. 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Utilise the Western Sydney City Deal Agreement to create Jobs for the Future.

Utilise the Western Sydney City Deal agreement to provide opportunities for residents in the LGA to enhance skills and education.

Further develop a commercial centre that accommodates a variety of employment opportunities.

Encourage and promote businesses to develop in the hospital health and medical precinct (of the City Centre).

Facilitate economic development.

Facilitate the development of new tourism based on local attractions, culture and creative industries.

Resources, and funding to support initiatives, to be considered as part of 2019/2020 budget review.

Environment

Retain viable opportunities for local food production while managing land use to meet urban growth.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Trade Engagement Strategy (Under separate cover)  


71

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 02

Liverpool Development Control Plan - Draft Amendment 33 and Liverpool Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan Amendment - Shopping Trolleys - Post Exhibition Report

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Manage the community’s disposal of rubbish

File Ref

047065.2019

Report By

Kweku Aikins - Strategic Planner

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At its 12 December 2018 meeting, Council resolved to endorse the draft Liverpool Development Control Plan (LDCP) 2008 (Amendment 33) and the draft Liverpool Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan (LGCP DCP) amendment concerning the management of shopping trolleys, place the documents on public exhibition for 28 days and report back to Council the details of any submissions received upon conclusion of the exhibition period.

 

Public exhibition of the draft DCPs was undertaken between 16 January 2019 and 15 February 2019, with eight submissions received. All submissions expressed support for the changes, however four of the submissions provided suggestions for additional enforcement measures to reduce the incidence of shopping trolley abandonment. 

 

Following public exhibition, no changes to the draft DCPs have been made. It is recommended that Council adopt the draft LDCP 2008 (Amendment 33) and the draft LGCP DCP.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Adopts draft Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 (Amendment 33) and draft Liverpool Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan as exhibited, to come into effect upon publication of the required notice in the local newspaper; and

 

2.   Advises those who lodged a submission of Council’s decision.

 

 

REPORT

 

Background

 

DCP amendments

 

A Notice of Motion (NOM) was considered at Council’s meeting of 26 September 2018 regarding abandoned shopping trolleys and their negative impacts on safety and public amenity.

 

As a result, Council resolved to “ensure that planning laws via DCPs minimise the negative effects of abandoning shopping trolleys by requiring shopping centres to confine shopping trolleys within a designated area”, and that “staff prepare a report to amend the DCP so that the DCP supports the coin operation or wheel lock of the shopping trolleys for business with over 20 trolleys.”

 

At the Council meeting on 12 December 2018, Council resolved to place the draft DCPs on public exhibition. The draft amendments to the DCP include controls to minimise the abandonment of shopping trolleys. The controls apply to new developments only, as businesses are lawfully permitted to operate within the parameters of their current conditions of development consent.

 

Advocacy for shopping trolley legislation

 

Council also resolved to “write to the State and Federal Government to review legislation enabling Councils similar powers to that in Queensland so that Councils can more effectively manage abandoned shopping trolleys”.

 

In January 2019, Council wrote to the Minister for Local Government and to the Australian Local Government Association to advocate for a review of legislation for abandoned shopping trolleys. A response was received from the Office of Local Government (OLG) (Attachment 1) on 1 March 2019.

 

OLG acknowledged abandoned shopping trolleys are of great concern for local Councils and the community. OLG advised that Councils have legal powers to deal with shopping trolleys including:

 

·    imposing conditions on development consents under the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act 1979;

·    impounding trolleys and charging the retailer a fee for their release under the Impounding Act 1993;

·    fining anyone abandoning a trolley or dumping one in a watercourse under the Local Government Act 1993 and the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997.

OLG has advised that they will consider Council’s suggestion for further regulation surrounding the requirement for tracking technology when the next review of the current legislation is undertaken.

 

Public exhibition

 

Public exhibition of the DCPs were undertaken between 16 January 2019 and 15 February 2019, in accordance with clause 18 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.  Eight submissions were received.

 

Key issues raised in submissions

 

All submissions expressed support for the proposed controls, however one submission noted the following: 

 

·    Any wheel lock system should still allow people to reach their cars. 

·    Council should consider making financial contributions to implementing trolley containment systems in local businesses.

·    Trolley bays should be in close proximity to cars and shops.

 

Another submission suggested that the new controls should also apply to existing developments. A third submission suggested that the containment of shopping trolleys should be administered under Work Health and Safety legislation and that this should be supported by implementing signage which clearly defines the applicable fines and enforcement measures for abandoning trolleys.

 

A fourth submission stated that coin-operated shopping trolleys are ineffective in preventing trolley abandonment and that a wheel lock system would be the preferred system of containment. 

 

Issues raised in the submissions and Council staff responses are outlined in Attachment 2.

Following consideration of the submissions received, no changes to the draft DCPs have been made. The suggested enforcement measures have either been incorporated into the DCP, or cannot be enforced by the DCP. The draft DCPs are included in Attachments 3 and 4.

 

It is recommended that Council adopt draft LDCP 2008 (Amendment 33) and draft LGCP DCP. If adopted, the DCP amendments will come into effect upon publication of the required notice in the local newspaper.     

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

Minimise household and commercial waste.

Manage the environmental health of waterways.

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.


Social

There are no social considerations


Civic Leadership

Act as an environmental leader in the community.

Foster neighbourhood pride and a sense of responsibility.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Response from NSW Office of Local Government  (Under separate cover)

2.         Response to submissions (Under separate cover)

3.         LDCP 2008 Part 1 - Section 28 & Appendix 1 (Under separate cover)

4.         LGCP DCP - Part 5 & Section 6.10  (Under separate cover)  


75

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 03

Proposed Amendment to Schedule 1 Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 - Additional Permitted Use for Multi Dwelling Housing at 123 Epsom Road, Chipping Norton

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

050248.2019

Report By

David Smith - Manager Planning & Transport Strategy

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At its ordinary meeting of 12 December 2018, Council resolved to provide in principle support to amend Schedule 1 of the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008, subject to the necessary planning investigations required by Section 3.33 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, to permit multi dwelling housing as a land use permitted with consent at 123 Epsom Road, Chipping Norton (Lot 3 DP 602936).

 

Council also resolved to investigate the value of any heritage listed trees that may be listed in or in close proximity to the site.

 

A planning proposal has been drafted as required by the above Council resolution (Attachment 1).

 

The planning assessment report is included in Attachment 2. The report outlines that the proposal has strategic and site specific merit and recommends that the planning proposal be submitted to the Department of Planning & Environment for a gateway determination.

 

Advice was sought from the Liverpool Local Planning Panel at its meeting on 25 February 2019 in accordance with the Local Planning Panel Direction – Planning Proposals dated 23 February 2018. Following an inspection of the site and considering the assessment report, the panel provided their advice (Attachment 3) that the Council defer a decision on the planning proposal until such time as the Local Housing Strategy has been adopted by Council.

 

Given the site specific nature of the proposal and the historical land use zoning that applied to this site, it is recommended that Council note the advice of the LPP, support in principle the planning proposal, and submit the proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment seeking a Gateway determination and public exhibition.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.       Notes the advice of the Liverpool Local Planning Panel;

 

2.       Supports in principle the planning proposal to amend Schedule 1 of the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 to permit multi dwelling housing as a land use permitted with consent at 123 Epsom Road, Chipping Norton (Lot 3 DP 602936);

 

3.       Delegates to the CEO to make any typographical or other editing amendments to the planning proposal if required;

 

4.       Forwards the planning proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment, pursuant to Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, seeking a Gateway determination;

 

5.       Subject to Gateway determination, undertake a heritage impact assessment to assess the heritage values of the palm trees adjacent to the site and undertake public exhibition and community consultation in accordance with the conditions of the Gateway determination; and

 

6.       Receive a further report on the outcomes of public exhibition and community consultation.

 

 

Report

 

The Site

 

The site is identified as Lot 3 in Deposited Plan 602936 otherwise known as 123 Epsom Road, Chipping Norton. The site is located at the south western corner of the intersection of Epsom Road and Governor Macquarie Drive.

 

Figure 1: Aerial view of the site (Source: Nearmap December 2018)

 

The Locality

 

The site is located in an area of predominantly low to medium density residential development. The lot immediately to the south (125 Epsom Road) and an additional two lots approximately 100m to the north-east (54 and 56 Central Avenue) have been developed for multi dwelling housing pursuant to the superseded Liverpool Local Environmental Plan (LLEP) 1997. Battle-axe style subdivision of larger lots has been undertaken on a number of other lots in the vicinity including 127, 143, 151, 165, and 181 Epsom Road.

 

Figure 2: Locality land zoning map (subject site highlighted yellow) (Source: Geocortex)

Approximately 200m south of the site, a parcel of lots was zoned R3 — Medium Density Residential at the time of the gazettal of LLEP 2008 pursuant to the direction of the Liverpool Residential Development Strategy. Around one third of the properties in the vicinity of the Georges River (fronting Epsom Road) have been developed for multi dwelling housing.

 

Lots in the vicinity of the Childs Road shops (along Childs Road, Banbury Crescent and the east of Epsom Road between Childs Road and Epsom Parkway) zoned R3 — Medium Density Residential would require amalgamation prior to development for multi dwelling housing purposes as these are largely low density residential allotments.

 

Council Resolution

 

At its ordinary meeting of 12 December 2018, Council resolved:

 

That Council:

 

1.   Supports in principle a proposal to amend Schedule 1 of the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 to allow multi dwelling housing as a land use permitted with consent on 123 Epsom Road, Chipping Norton (Lot 3 DP 602936), subject to the necessary planning investigations required by Section 3.33 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act;

 

2.   Direct the CEO to prepare a planning proposal for Council’s consideration and report back to Council for the second February 2019 meeting; and

 

3.   Investigate the value of any heritage listed trees that may be listed in or in close proximity to the site.

 

The planning proposal has been drafted as required by the above Council resolution (Attachment 1).

 

Planning Assessment

 

The planning assessment report is contained in Attachment 2. It provides a detailed assessment of the merits of the proposal against the District and Region Plans and the Department of Planning’s ‘Guide to Preparing Planning Proposals’. The report’s conclusion is that the planning proposal has strategic and site specific merit and should proceed to a Gateway determination.

 

Local Planning Panel Advice

 

The planning proposal was considered by the Panel at its 25 February 2019 meeting and their advice is included at Attachment 3.

 

 

 

The advice of the LPP is:

 

The Panel has inspected the site and read the Council officer’s report. The Panel received one representation from the owner.

 

The Panel is concerned that a decision to change the permitted uses on this site in isolation is premature in light of the upcoming review of the LEP2008, a component of which will be informed by the Local Housing Strategy (LHS). The Panel has been informed by Council officers that the strategy will be finalised imminently.

 

The Panel suggests that Council should be mindful to not pre-empt or prejudice the outcome of the strategy in relation to this site. Until the strategy is finalised, the Panel is not confident in recommending that the planning proposal has strategic merit.

 

The Panel recommends Council defer a decision on the planning proposal until such time as the LHS (Local Housing Strategy) has been adopted by Council.

 

Officer comment on LPP Advice

 

It is recommended that Council note the advice of the LPP and support in principle the planning proposal and submit the proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment seeking a Gateway determination and public exhibition.

 

The reasons for this recommendation are:

 

·    the proposal has strategic and site specific merit;

·    the proposal is site specific and will not undermine the strategic planning framework;

·    the site is relatively large and can accommodate, subject to development consent, an appropriate multi dwelling housing development;

·    the surrounding development is consistent with that proposed for this site; and

·    the historical land use zoning that applied to this site which permitted multi-dwelling housing.

 

Consistency with Community Strategic Plan

 

Our Home Liverpool 2027

 

Council’s Our Home, Liverpool 2027 provides strategic directions that have been identified by the community and the measures that will allow Council to determine progress towards achieving them. The four key directions are: creating connection, strengthening and protecting our environment, generating opportunity and leading through collaboration. The planning proposal aligns predominately with the second and third directions which states:

 

 

 

 

Liverpool Council will:

·    Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive, urban environments

·    Develop, and advocate for, plans that support safe and friendly communities

·    Meet the challenges of Liverpool’s growing population

 

The planning proposal is in general supportive of these goals. The Schedule 1 amendment to the LEP would ultimately deliver (subject to further development assessment) a multi dwelling housing development on the site to contribute additional housing within the area.

 

Consultation

 

During the preparation of the planning proposal, consultation was undertaken with Council’s traffic engineers and heritage advisor.

 

The site is a corner allotment with a primary frontage to Epsom Road and a secondary frontage to Governor Macquarie Drive. Council’s traffic engineers have requested a traffic impact assessment be prepared following a Gateway determination to ensure no access to the site from Governor Macquarie Drive, appropriate access to the site from Epsom Road and other site specific matters.

 

The site contains and adjoins a row of locally significant palm trees (Phoenix canariensis). The trees on the Governor Macquarie Drive road reserve are heritage listed under Clause 5.10 of the LLEP 2008. The palm trees on the site are not heritage listed. Should the proposal receive a Gateway determination it is recommended that a heritage impact assessment be commissioned to address the heritage value of the palm trees located on and adjacent to the site.

 

Conclusion

 

The planning proposal has strategic and site-specific merit. It is recommended that the planning proposal be supported by Council in principle and be forwarded to the Department of Planning & Environment for a Gateway determination and public exhibition.

 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Facilitate economic development

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Preserve and maintain heritage, both landscape and cultural as urban development takes place.

Regulate for a mix of housing types that responds to different population groups such as young families and older people.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Planning Proposal (Under separate cover)

2.         Planning Assessment Report (Under separate cover)

3.         Liverpool Local Planning Panel Advice (Under separate cover)

 

 


87

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 04

Destination Management Plan 2018/19 - 2022/23

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Attract businesses for economic growth and employment opportunities

File Ref

051480.2019

Report By

Vi Girgis - Senior Officer City Precinct

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

Executive Summary

 

The Destination Management Plan (DMP) is a five year plan, detailing Council’s priorities for the development of the visitor economy in Liverpool. The DMP provides strategic directions and defines Council’s role and commitment to meeting the needs of the visitor economy in Liverpool. At the Council meeting of 6 February 2019, the draft plan was presented for Council’s endorsement and was subsequently approved to be placed on public exhibition.

 

Growing Liverpool’s visitor economy is part of Council’s broader vision to stimulate the local economy through the injection of new spending, creation of employment opportunities and increased demand for local goods and services. A strong visitor economy will showcase and celebrate the city’s assets – its people and lifestyle, rich cultural diversity, heritage, natural assets and events. Marketing and promotion will enhance the City’s profile, thereby building and strengthening community pride and raising investor confidence.

 

The DMP’s vision is to be: A place locals are proud to call home; celebrating and sharing our diversity, heritage and nature. Its objective is: To build a thriving visitor economy and increase the economic benefits that flow from tourism to local businesses and communities through unique visitor experiences. The DMP includes a five-year Action Plan to realise the vision and objective.

The DMP has five strategic directions, that:

·    Promote Liverpool as a core visitor destination through increased engagement and support from locals;

·    Support local businesses, groups and organisations to build and develop the visitor economy and their tourism products;

·    Celebrate Liverpool’s diversity and utilise it to grow and strengthen the visitor market base;

·    Attract new businesses, events and investment to engagement local and increase visitation to Liverpool; and

·    Leverage existing and emerging assets to grow Liverpool’s visitor economy.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts the Destination Management Plan 2018/19-2022/23.

 

REPORT

 

1.       BACKGROUND

 

1.1     Council Decision, 6 February 2019

 

At the Council meeting of 6 February 2019, Council was presented with the Draft Destination Management Plan and resolved to:

 

1.   Endorse the Draft Destination Management Plan for public exhibition, with the following amendments:

a.   On page 20, in the Current Visitation section amend the third point so it reads:

-     34,982 international visitors per year (new data TBC) indicates a growth up to 200,000 international visitors staying in Liverpool and surrounding area per year.

b.   On page 21, 3.2 Tourism Assets an additional point be added:

-     International and national tourism destination

c.   On page 23, 3.3 Liverpool Regions Strengths and Assets, point 7 be amended so that it reads:

-     Liverpool and surrounds have significant supply of hotels and short-term accommodation servicing the current demand of 200,000 international and national visitors (TBC). More accommodation will be required to meet the demand towards the opening of Western Sydney Airport.

 

2.   Receive a report in March 2019 detailing any submissions received and for the adoption of the Destination Management Plan, or if no submissions are received, delegate to the CEO to adopt the plan.

 

1.2     Liverpool City Council Objectives

The DMP provides the direction and framework for growing Liverpool’s visitor economy, defining Council’s role and commitment to meeting the needs of the visitor economy.

It aligns with directions from Council’s Community Strategic Plan, Our Home, Liverpool 2027, specifically the following goals:

·    Direction 1: Creating Connection

Celebrate diversity, promote inclusion and recognise heritage

Implement access and equity for all members of the community

Provide community facilities which are accessible to all

 

·    Direction 2: Strengthening and protecting our environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive, urban environments

·    Direction 3: Generating opportunity

Meet the challenges of Liverpool’s growing population

Attract businesses for economic growth and employment opportunities

Create an attractive environment for investment

·    Direction 4: Leading through collaboration

Seek efficient and innovative methods to manage our resources

Increase community engagement

 

The DMP also delivers on various actions and principles articulated in other Council plans including, but not limited to, the Cultural Strategy 2017-2021, City Activation Strategy 2018-2023, and Liverpool Economic Development Strategy 2019-2029.

 

1.3       Strategy Development and Consultation

 

The Destination Management Plan was produced to detail Council’s priorities for the development of the visitor economy in Liverpool. Growing Liverpool’s visitor economy is part of Council’s broader vision to stimulate the local economy via increased visitor spending, facilitation and creation of employment opportunities and increased demand for local goods and services.

 

The process of developing the DMP involved the following steps:

·    Consultation with internal stakeholders.

·    Consultation with external stakeholders including:

Health, innovation and education organisations

Hotels

Food and beverage providers

Entertainment, retail and tourism industry

Sport, events and culture groups

Liverpool Liquor Accord

Other industries

·    Consultation at community forums, including:

Rural District Forum

Eastern District Forum

New Release/ Established District Forum

·    Public exhibition for 30 days.

·    Presentation to the Tourism and CBD Committee. 


 

 

1.3.1    Results from community consultation

The draft DMP was placed on public exhibition via Council’s Liverpool Listens portal for three weeks, with a survey to garner community feedback. The survey received 34 responses from a range of community members. The results of the survey are outlined below, with a selection of written responses. A more detailed report is attached to this document.

 

A summary of the results show:

·    97.1% ‘strongly support’ or ‘support’ the Plan’s vision

·    100% ‘strongly support or ‘support’ the Plan’s objective

·    79% support all four strategic directions

·    61.7% support all actions, 100% support some or all of the actions

·    97.1% believe that the plan addresses the needs of Liverpool’s growing population ‘very well’, well’ or ‘somewhat’

·    81.8% are residents of Liverpool LGA, remaining responders are from Manly, Wentworthville, Pyrmont, Quakers Hill, Oran Park, Bonnyrigg, Mount Pritchard and Bow Bowing.

Some representative comments were:

·    “I love this. I’d love to see Liverpool become a popular destination for all. Having lived here in Liverpool nearly my whole life, I’d love for it to become an innovation district where people travel from all over to Liverpool for an experience.”

·    “In the travel industry we need to always be aware of the impact tourism has on the local community. This approach ensures there is no negative footprint.”

·    “It’s a fantastic opportunity for Liverpool to grow and be a major city. Keeping the diversity is great so we can all come together as one. Heritage to me is huge. Liverpool has so much heritage to preserve.”

·    “I love it. The more community events, retail stores, cafés and restaurants the better. Especially because my friends and I would usually have to travel towards the city for food or entertainment.”

Summary of key issues raised:

·    Lack of parking in the city centre

·    Lack of recreational and entertainment options throughout the LGA

·    Lack of evening activities

·    Overall presentation of the city centre needs improvement

 

1.3.2      Changes to the Plan arising from consultations

Overall, feedback from internal and external stakeholders, as well as the community, was positive and supportive of the Plan and its initiatives. As such, minimal changes were made relating to the following:

·    The vision for Liverpool’s DMP originally presented to Council was: To become an attractive visitor destination, loved and promoted by its locals for its diversity, heritage and nature. Through the consultation process, the vision has been amended to take on more ‘active’ language, but retaining the original sentiment of celebrating the local. The updated vision is: A place locals are proud to call home; celebrating and sharing our diversity, heritage and nature.

·    Weaknesses section re-examined to identify opportunities for growth and improvements based on existing weaknesses of the Liverpool visitor economy

·    Addition of a fifth strategic direction – Leverage existing and emerging assets to grow Liverpool’s visitor economy. This is linked to strengthening of actions related to the Western Sydney Airport.

·    Amendment to Action 8 to set a more ambitious approach towards the Western Sydney Airport.

·    Amendment to Action 11 to include recreational spaces with sports tourism, i.e. 11.3 Generate a large group guide with local businesses for those visiting for sporting or group events.

 

2.       DESTINATION MANAGEMENT PLAN

2.1     Vision of the Plan

A place locals are proud to call home; celebrating and sharing our diversity, heritage and nature.

 

2.2     Objective of the Plan

To build a thriving visitor economy and increase the economic benefits that flow from tourism to local businesses and communities through unique visitor experiences.

 

2.3     Key Strategic Directions

A set of guiding strategic directions were identified to ensure effective development and delivery of the plan. These include:

·    Promote Liverpool as a core visitor destination through increased engagement and support from locals.

·    Support local businesses, groups and organisations to build and develop the visitor economy and their tourism products.

·    Celebrate Liverpool’s diversity and utilise it to grow and strengthen the visitor market base.

·    Attract new businesses, events and investment to engage locals and increase visitation to Liverpool.

·    Leverage existing and emerging assets to grow Liverpool’s visitor economy.

2.4     Actions

The Plan has 20 overarching actions to be completed over the next five years, as follows:

1.   Develop a visitor brand identity and marketing campaign plan.

2.   Position Liverpool as a multicultural hub.

3.   Investigate the sustainability of a Visitor Information Centre.

4.   Develop a way finding strategy which will assist visitors in the CBD and surrounds.

5.   Work with surrounding LGAs to create a visitor destination network for the region.

6.   Assist and support local businesses, groups and organisations in the development of the visitor economy, whilst attracting new businesses for future growth.

7.   Improve the visitor experience journey through a variety of trails.

8.   Leverage the Western Sydney International (Nancy-Bird Walton) Airport development and related visitor growth to further expand and develop the local visitor economy.

9.   Investigate a potential site for a recreational vehicle holiday park within Liverpool LGA.

10. Grow Liverpool’s presence on guided holiday itineraries.

11. Grow the local recreation tourism market.

12. Establish Liverpool as a culinary tourism destination.

13. Grow event-based visitation.

14. Establish Liverpool as a leading destination for medical tourism and events.

15. Capitalise on Liverpool’s rich local heritage.

16. Build a strong education-based visitor economy.

17. Facilitate increased visitor economy investment.

18. Provide ongoing support to the accommodation sector in Liverpool.

19. Position Liverpool as a shopping destination.

20. Determine baseline visitation figures.

 

Through collaboration with internal and external stakeholders, the City Economy Unit is able to deliver on the actions of the DMP through existing resources. Opportunities to seek additional funding sources and partnerships will also be explored where appropriate, in order to increase the capacity to generate high quality outcomes.

 

2.5     Evaluation and Review

This DMP will be reviewed every two years, considering the following:

1.   Council’s ongoing commitment to the purpose and objectives of the DMP;

2.   Mechanisms to collect feedback on Council’s activities in growing the visitor economy;

3.   Whether the manner in which Council manages this Plan and related activities is professional, transparent and accountable;

4.   Whether conflicts of interest are identified and activities terminated should a conflict of interest arise that cannot be resolved;

5.   Achievements against the Action Plan; and

6.   Determine priorities from the Action Plan for the following two years.


 

CONSIDERATIONS

Economic

Further develop a commercial centre that accommodates a variety of employment opportunities.

Deliver and maintain a range of transport related infrastructure such as footpaths, bus shelters and bikeways.

Encourage and promote businesses to develop in the hospital health and medical precinct (of the City Centre).

Facilitate economic development.

Facilitate the development of new tourism based on local attractions, culture and creative industries.

Environment

Protect, enhance and maintain areas of endangered ecological communities and high quality bushland as part of an attractive mix of land uses.


Social

Raise awareness in the community about the available services and facilities.

Provide cultural centres and activities for the enjoyment of the arts.

Support policies and plans that prevent crime.

Preserve and maintain heritage, both landscape and cultural as urban development takes place.

Deliver high quality services for children and their families.


Civic Leadership

Undertake communication practices with the community and stakeholders across a range of media.

Foster neighbourhood pride and a sense of responsibility.

Facilitate the development of community leaders.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Actively advocate for federal and state government support, funding and services.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Destination Management Plan 2018/19 - 2022/23 (Under separate cover)

2.         Liverpool Listens - Destination Management Plan (Under separate cover)  


89

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 05

Post Exhibition Report - Schedule 1 Amendment to Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 - Draft Amendment 73 at 2A & 4 Helles Ave, Moorebank

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

054897.2019

Report By

Matthew Roberts - Graduate Strategic Planner

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

Property

2A & 4 Helles Avenue, Moorebank (Cnr Lot 3 DP 626253)

Owner

A C McGrath and Co. Pty. Ltd.

Applicant

Automotive Holdings Group - NSW

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At its Ordinary Meeting on 29 August 2018, Council resolved to support a planning proposal to amend Schedule 1 of the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (LLEP 2008) to enable an additional permitted use of vehicle sales or hire premises at 2A & 4 Helles Avenue, Moorebank and to forward the planning proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment for Gateway determination.

 

This report updates Council on the Gateway determination which was issued for the planning proposal (Draft Amendment 73) and the results of the public exhibition and community consultation undertaken in support of the amendment.

 

It is recommended that Council support the making of Amendment 73 and liaises with the Parliamentary Counsel Office to finalise the amendment. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1.       Notes the Gateway determination for the draft Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 73) and the results of the public exhibition and community consultation; and

2.       Approves Amendment 73 and delegates authority to the CEO to liaise with the NSW Parliamentary Counsel’s Office to finalise the amendment.

 

Report

 

Background

 

This planning proposal is site specific and relates to land at 2A & 4 Helles Avenue, Moorebank (Lots 1 & 3 DP626253). The site is approximately 1.2km south-east of the Liverpool City Centre and accessed via Moorebank Avenue. The site and its surrounds are zoned IN1 – General Industrial, with the nearest residential development approximately 250m north-east of the site. The approved Moorebank Intermodal Terminal is located approximately 1km south (on the southern side of the M5) and Helles Park is 160m to the west. Mannheim Auctions is located directly opposite the site at 144 Moorebank Avenue, Moorebank.

 

 

Objectives of the Planning Proposal

 

The key objective of the planning proposal is to enable vehicle sales and auctions to be undertaken within the existing warehouse on site.

 

Gateway Determination

 

Gateway determination (Attachment 1) was received on 5 November 2018 and required the following actions:

1.   Prior to undertaking public exhibition, Council shall amend the planning proposal to include a project timeline, consistent with Section 2.6 of Part 6 of A guide to preparing local environmental plans (Department of Planning and Environment 2016).

2.   Public exhibition is required under Section 3.34(2)(c) and Schedule 1 Clause 4 of the Act as follows:

(a)  The planning proposal is classified as low impact, as described in A guide to preparing local environmental plans (Department of Planning and Environment 2016) and must be made publicly available for a minimum of 14 days; and

(b)  The planning proposal authority must comply with the notice requirements for public exhibition of planning proposals and the specifications for material that must be made publicly available along with planning proposals as identified in section 5.5.2 of A guide to preparing local environmental plans (Department of Planning and Environment 2016).

3.   Consultation is required with Roads and Maritimes Services under Section 3.34(2)(d) of the Act. Roads and Maritime Services is to be provided with a copy of the planning proposal and any relevant supporting material, and given at least 21 days to comment on the proposal.

The Gateway determination authorised Council as the local plan making authority to make Amendment 73.

 

Consultation

 

Public Authority Consultation

 

In accordance with the Gateway determination, the RMS were consulted and raised no objections to the proposal, provided vehicular access to the site is from Helles Avenue, which it is.

 

Public Exhibition

 

In accordance with the Gateway determination, the planning proposal was placed on public exhibition from 6 February 2019 to 22 February 2019. Notification included notices on Council’s website, the Liverpool Leader newspaper and an advertising poster in Council’s administration centre.

 

No submissions were received for this planning proposal.

 

 

Conclusion

 

The Gateway requirements, including public exhibition and community consultation for Draft Amendment 73 have been satisfied. No submissions were received during the public exhibition of the proposal and as a result no changes are proposed.

 

This report recommends that Council approves Amendment 73 and delegates authority to the CEO to liaise with the Parliamentary Counsel’s Office to finalise the amendment.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Facilitate economic development.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Gateway determination (Under separate cover)

2.         Updated Planning Proposal (Under separate cover)

3.         RMS Submission (Under separate cover)  


93

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 06

Proposed Amendment to State Environmental Planning Policy (Sydney Region Growth Centres) 2006 - Austral / Leppington North Precinct and Liverpool Growth Centre Precinct DCP

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

055789.2019

Report By

Ian Stendara - Executive Planner

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council at its meeting on 27 June 2018 resolved to:

 

1.   Support the drafting of a Development Control Plan (DCP) and State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) amendment to the proposed road network in the Austral/Leppington North release area including local area traffic management controls and consequential amendments to the Austral / Leppington North Contributions Plan with particular emphasis on the question of carriageway width;

 

2.   Note that opportunities to undertake some or all of this work as part of a City Deal commitment to review the design and engineering standards for the Western City District will be explored; and

 

3.   Receives a further report detailing the draft SEPP, DCP and Contributions Plan amendments once drafted.

This report provides the detail as to the draft amendment to State Environmental Planning Policy (Sydney Region Growth Centres) 2006 (the SEPP), and the draft Liverpool Growth Centre Precinct Development Control Plan (the DCP).

 

A draft amendment to the Liverpool Contributions Plan 2014 Austral and Leppington North Precincts (the Contributions Plan) is outlined in the report but will be advanced as part of another project (the Austral Contributions Plan review).

 

The proposed amendments have been expanded to include changes to the drainage network as a result of Council’s detailed stormwater and flood mitigation strategy for the Austral / Leppington North precinct.

 

A series of maps (Attachment 1) highlight areas where the proposed road network is to be amended, with some land to be rezoned to provide for the more efficient use of land.  A series of new standard street cross-sections and plans have been prepared to provide for Local Area Traffic Management (LATM), to facilitate greater on-street parking and to improve stormwater runoff quality.

 

This report recommends that the planning proposal be supported in principle by Council and submitted to the Department of Planning and Environment seeking a Gateway determination and public exhibition. The report also recommends that subject to a Gateway determination, the draft DCP be placed on exhibition concurrently with the planning proposal.

 

Council, as a planning proposal authority may propose amendments to a State Environmental Planning Policy pursuant to Clause 3.32 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979. Council is not authorised to finalise the planning proposal if adopted, as the changes required are to a SEPP and not an LEP and the requirements of Division 3.3 of the Act apply. If supported by Council, the proposal will proceed in the normal process for an LEP amendment, being a gateway determination, state agency and public consultation and post exhibition considerations.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Endorses the planning proposal to amend State Environmental Planning Policy (Sydney Region Growth Centres) 2006 – Austral / Leppington North Precinct and the proposed amendments to the Liverpool Growth Centre Precinct Development Control Plan;

 

2.   Notes that amendments to the Liverpool Contributions Plan 2014 (Austral and Leppington North Precincts) as a result of this planning proposal and the DCP amendment will be advanced under a separate review of the contributions plan;

 

3.   Delegates to the CEO the authority to make any minor typographical and publishing changes to the planning proposal and the Development Control Plan (DCP) prior to seeking a Gateway determination;

 

4.   Forwards the planning proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment pursuant to section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, seeking a Gateway determination;

 

5.   Subject to Gateway determination, undertakes public exhibition and community consultation in accordance with the conditions of the Gateway determination; and

 

6.   Receives a further report on the outcome of the public exhibition and community consultation.

 

REPORT

 

Background

Austral was rezoned in March 2013 by the Department of Planning. This was the first precinct in Liverpool to be rezoned in the growth centres. The SEPP and the DCP were both drafted by the Department of Planning, with input from Council.

 

The Indicative Layout Plan (ILP), which is a part of the DCP, is a map which shows the future road network and the land uses (but not zones) in the precincts (e.g. residential, active open space etc.). The ILP provides Council, developers and land-owners with certainty as to how the land will be developed in a coordinated manner. It is important that land is developed according to the ILP to ensure that precinct scale planning objectives are achieved.

 

A report was prepared for the 27 June 2018 Council meeting seeking support for the drafting of amendments to the SEPP and the DCP in order to optimise the road network, remove or alter some bridge crossings, and prepare Local Area Traffic Management (LATM) controls. It was noted that this required amendments to the SEPP, the DCP and the Contributions Plan. Council also requested that Council officers investigate road widths in particular in the growth area.

 

This report details the amendments to the SEPP and the DCP to achieve the above outcomes.

 

Network Optimisation

The aim of the proposed SEPP and DCP amendment is to optimise the ILP and road network layout by:

 

a)   Making properties easier to develop by accommodating sufficient roads to provide access to new lots;

b)   Make land subdivision more efficient by providing nominal block depths in low density areas of 60-70m, where achievable;

c)   Spreading burdens and benefits associated with roads more equitably amongst land-owners, thereby facilitating greater development take-up;

d)   Increasing pedestrian permeability in the precinct, by ensuring that excessively long street blocks are dissected by new roads or pedestrian access paths; and

e)   Rezoning surplus stormwater overland flow paths, and amending the ILP road network to allow for a development outcome consistent with surrounding lands.

 

Due to the number of changes being proposed, impacts on each property are not described in this report, rather general themes are described below and a series of maps at Attachment 1 describe all changes in detail.

 

 

 

Block Depth:

 

In some instances the distance between new planned roads (as indicated by the ILP) is too great or too small to allow for efficient subdivision. A standard street block should be approximately 60-70 metres deep to allow for 30-35m deep lots (most off-the-plan project homes are designed for 30m deep lots). In some instances, blocks in the current ILP were approximately 80-100m deep which does not facilitate efficient subdivision of land. These instances have been corrected where possible and are noted on plans in Attachment 1.

 

Lot Boundaries:

 

There are some instances where the location of planned roads do not align with existing lot boundaries which results in residue land which cannot be developed until surrounding properties develop. Where there were likely to be residual lot issues, slight alterations are proposed to the planned road network.

 

Cross-streets:

 

Some blocks do not have regularly spaced cross-streets. Regular cross-streets improve pedestrian connectivity and legibility by allowing for greater freedom of movement (an area that allows for free movement is said to be highly permeable). In a few instances a pedestrian access path can be used to link blocks where a full width street is undesirable (e.g. intersecting on an unsafe corner). A number of additional connections have been added to the precinct.

 

Drainage Network

Since Council’s June resolution to proceed with the SEPP and DCP amendments, a detailed stormwater and drainage study has been prepared for the Austral and Leppington North precincts. This study provides the detailed concept design of all stormwater infrastructure in the precinct compared to the more conceptual modelling carried out by the Department of Planning when the precinct was rezoned. As a result of this more detailed understanding, it is now clear that some of the zoned stormwater basins and overland flow paths are not required for the efficient functioning of the stormwater network. Some stormwater basins are not necessary for flood mitigation purposes and a sufficiently sized pipe located under a road is capable of moving stormwater in some locations rather than a swale.

 

In line with the objectives of optimizing the ILP, it is proposed that several of these surplus stormwater channels are rezoned to be the same as the adjoining zone. Planning controls will be carried over from adjoining lands which will allow for this surplus land to be used more efficiently. This also requires amending the proposed road network in close proximity to these surplus overland flow paths.

 

Carrying out these changes requires an amendment to the SEPP and DCP, and is included in Attachment 2, 3 and 4. Amendments to the Contributions Plan will be carried out in a separate but related process, as described further in this report.

 

Bridge Crossings

A number of culverts and bridge crossings are proposed to be removed or amended. This is based on the high costs of constructing and maintaining such crossings when they are not needed for efficient traffic and pedestrian movement. Several of these road crossings are to be replaced by pedestrian bridges, to ensure precinct pedestrian permeability outcomes can still be maintained. The objectives of removing some bridge crossing are based on ensuring that:

a)   The road network remains sufficient for distributing traffic in the precincts;

b)   Pedestrian permeability is not impacted by the removal of road bridge crossings;

c)   Any bridge crossings are capable of being designed to a standard which does not impede stormwater flows, nor present a safety issue for residents in the event of storm conditions;

d)   Any existing and future residents will retain road access and that alternative routes will be provided; and

e)   Minimise costs of development by reducing contributions expenditure in relation to proposed bridges and culverts.

The maps at Attachment 1 indicate road crossings which have been removed and/or replaced by pedestrian crossings. Removing or amending these bridges requires changes to the DCP road network and the Contributions Plans.

Traffic Safety, Water Sensitive Urban Design and Road Widths

Key objectives of preparing such amendments are:

 

a)   For local streets, prioritise pedestrian and cyclists and provide a pleasant environment which encourages walking and social interaction, whilst maintaining vehicular access;

b)   Increase road safety by providing a street design to ensure a low-speed traffic environment (40-50km/h) on local streets by influencing driver behaviour, through both visual and physical cues;

c)   Provide certainty and transparency to developers by specifying the street design requirements and the general location and type of traffic calming facilities required;

d)   Improve public amenity and decrease stormwater pollution by the use of Local Area Traffic Management (LATM) facilities and Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) elements which do not add visual clutter but rather soften the streetscape;

e)   Maximise potential for on-street parking and minimise disruptions to residents; and

f)    Discourage traffic calming devices which decrease pedestrian and cyclist safety, induce noise, are a visual blight, and can cause damage to vehicles.

Council resolved to investigate road widths (with an emphasis on increasing opportunities for on-street parking and minimising traffic disruptions) at its June 2018 meeting. As detailed previously, Council has completed a detailed stormwater and drainage technical study. One of the conclusions of the stormwater strategy was that the water quality improvement facilities (known as raingardens) proposed in the precinct planning framework were not going to be sufficient to adequately reduce stormwater pollutants entering the creek system.

Given the need to improve traffic safety, provide for on-street parking and improve stormwater run-off quality, an integrated solution was developed which addresses all of these matters concurrently. It is proposed that an amended local road design will address these matters.

To understand the benefits of the new approach, it is important to understand the current roads being constructed in the Austral and Leppington North precincts. A cross section for a local road (as per the DCP), as well as an aerial image and photos of a completed road is provided in Figure 1, Figure 2, and Figure 3 below.

Local Streets

Figure 1: Standard Local Street cross section from the DCP

Figure 2: Photo of a typical street completed in accordance with the current DCP

 

Figure 3: An aerial image of the same street as Figure 2 - note the long straight uninterrupted length.

The existing local road cross section in the DCP consists of the following design elements:

·    9m paved carriageway with no visual distinction between travel lanes and parking areas.

 

In instances where there are no parked cars this creates the perception of extra wide lanes (4.5m wide, most freeway lanes are about 3.5m wide), which encourages higher vehicle speeds;

When vehicles are parked on both sides of the street, there is not sufficient space for a light truck and car to pass each other without significant deceleration. Generally, one would pull into a space and give way, causing driver frustration and noise associated with breaking and acceleration.

 

·    Road corridors are long and straight. Whilst this improves legibility and connectivity, it also encourages speeding especially when combined with wide lanes. As seen in Figure 2, drivers have a long field of view and there are no streetscape elements which would cause drivers to proceed with caution or slow down.

 

·    A landscaped strip at the side of the road area provides space for street tree planting, but the typical kerb and gutter treatment does not carry any water into vegetated space, or provide for any on street water quality improvements; all water flows to a concrete channel and drain where it must be treated down-stream to filter any pollutants.

The cross section in Figure 4 below indicates the proposed design solution which would be applied to all local roads in the Austral and Leppington North precinct.

Figure 4: Proposed Local Street Section

 

 

The proposed corridor involves the following design elements:

·    Narrowing the road carriageway from 9 metres (which was also combined with on-street parking) to 6 metres. This provides sufficient space for a car and light truck to pass without one giving way to another.

The narrower travel lanes (3m each way) will influence drivers to travel at a more reasonable speed for a residential environment.

·    The flush kerb and 2.2m wide parking bays beside the carriageway provides opportunities for on-street parking on both sides of the road without obstructing travel lanes.

·    Passively irrigated tree pits will utilise water run-off from the road to water street trees, providing for healthier trees and reducing water quantity into the stormwater system. As shown in Figure 5:

tree pits will be alternated with parking bays and driveway crossings. Planting vegetation closer to, but not obstructing travel lanes again gives the perception of narrower, quieter streets and will provide further visual re-enforcement for drivers to adjust their speed for a residential environment;

additional landscaping improved streetscape appearance;

canopy trees shade the dark road surfaces and reduce urban heat build-up.

·    The new cross-section has been designed to cater for medium rigid axle vehicles such as garbage trucks and fire trucks. Intersections and road widths have been designed to provide for truck manoeuvrability. Waste bins can be presented for collection between the parking/landscaping bays and the travel lanes.

 

·    Rain gardens will be installed at the intersections of local streets which would filter many stormwater pollutants from entering into the drainage system. This solution negates the need to provide stand-alone bio-filtration systems, saving Council and developers the costs associated with land-acquisition and construction of such facilities. Construction of rain-gardens will be the responsibility of each developer when building new roads.

Figure 5: Plan view of two intersecting local streets (16m wide)

 

This design solution combines many well used methods nationally and internationally at controlling local traffic speeds, providing additional on-street parking and improving stormwater quality. This solution does not increase the road reserve width of new local streets in Austral but will provide for a higher aesthetic and functional street network which will be of benefit to the community.

New cross sections for other road types have been prepared, including a new cross section for the layout of local streets (typically 16m) which are located within an existing road corridor (typically 20m). This new section has been prepared to resolve confusion where developers were unsure as to what to do with the excess road reserve land. Further details of these changes can be seen in the DCP amendment in Attachment 3.

In addition to changes to the local road sections to facilitate a calmer traffic environment, controls within the DCP which detail matters related to LATM have been amended. Existing controls, which were vague and unclear are to be replaced by a new section within the Movement Network section of the DCP. Section 3.3.2 Local Area Traffic Management provides clarity and certainty as to Council’s expectations for traffic calming devices. The controls have been drafted in a manner which adheres to the objectives as stipulated on page 96 of this report.

Water Cycle Management Controls

As discussed previously, Council’s detailed stormwater network study informed the decision to rezone some surplus drainage lands but also to move away from stand-alone bio-retention facilities to on-street raingarden facilities. In order to ensure that the raingardens are designed appropriately and to ensure plant survival, a new set of controls introduced into the DCP detail the construction of these facilities. Diagrams also assist to specify the layout and design of raingardens. Further details of these changes is contained in the DCP amendment in Attachment 3.

Amendments to the Austral / Leppington North Contributions Plan

Council levies new development to fund infrastructure under the Liverpool Contributions Plan 2014 (Austral and Leppington North Precincts). The Contributions Plan has already funded over $6 million of infrastructure which will increase over the next few years as development progresses.

The amendments proposed to the SEPP and DCP will require an amendment to the Contributions Plan to ensure strategic alignment. As a result, the key changes to the Contributions Plan will be a reduction in the amount of land Council needs to acquire to deliver specific infrastructure items and changes to works, such as bio-swales (dedicated drainage basins with plants, filters and other materials to reduce pollution) and culvert crossings (pre-fabricated sectional bridges which allow roads to cross over creeks).

In addition to the necessary updates to the contributions plan to support the SEPP and DCP amendments, Council will submit the updated contributions plan to the Independent Pricing And Regulatory Tribunal (IPART), as a step towards recovery contributions impacted by the current cap of $30,000 per allotment.

Given the interdependencies it is appropriate to allow Council the opportunity to consider the changes to the SEPP and DCP prior to making any consequential amendments to the Contributions Plan. As such, adjustment of the contributions plan will be undertaken as a separate project and will be reported to Council for endorsement.

Advice of the Local Planning Panel

Clause 2.19(1)(b) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 requires that any planning proposal must be submitted to the Local Planning Panel for their advice prior to being considered by Council. Only the planning proposal is required to be reviewed by the LPP. In accordance with the Act, the LPP does not have the responsibility to review any contributions plan or DCP amendment. The draft ILP was provided to the LPP for additional context, but no comments were sought, nor provided on those changes.

The planning panel supported the planning proposal proceeding to a Gateway determination. The LPP advice is attached as Attachment 5.

Consistency with Community Strategic Plan

 

Our Home Liverpool 2027

 

Council’s Our Home, Liverpool 2027 provides strategic directions that have been identified by the community and the measures that will allow Council to determine progress towards achieving them. The four key directions are: creating connection, strengthening and protecting our environment, generating opportunity and leading through collaboration. The planning proposal aligns predominately with the second and third directions which states:

 

Liverpool Council will:

·    Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive, urban environments

·    Develop, and advocate for, plans that support safe and friendly communities

·    Meet the challenges of Liverpool’s growing population

·    Attract businesses for economic growth and employment opportunities

·    Create an attractive environment for investment

 

The planning proposal is in general supportive of these goals, particularly point 1, 2 and 3.

 

Consultation

Detailed consultation has occurred with all relevant divisions of Council as well as staff from the Department of Planning and Environment.

Council’s Planning and Transport Strategy and Development Assessment teams advocated for the ILP road optimisation and it has been developed with their input in addition to Land Development Engineering and Floodplain and Water Management staff.

Council’s Technical Support team advocated for the removal of certain proposed road bridges. This was discussed and developed with Planning and Transport Strategy, Floodplain and Water Management and Infrastructure Delivery staff.

Council’s Planning and Transport Strategy team advocated for the LATM provisions. This was discussed and developed with input from Development Assessment, City Design and Public Domain, Maintenance Planning and Reporting, City Works and Land Development Engineering staff.

Council’s Floodplain and Water Management team advocated changes to the stormwater and drainage network and subsequent amendments to the road cross-sections. This was discussed and developed with input from Development Assessment, City Design and Public Domain and Land Development Engineering staff.

As part of any SEPP or DCP amendment community consultation would occur, with a minimum exhibition period of 28 days.

It is proposed that each applicant who has previously submitted a pre-lodgement development application (Pre-DA) will be notified of the amendment. It is also proposed that the land-owner of each undeveloped property who is affected by changes to the SEPP and/or DCP will be notified in writing via a letter to their postal address.

Next Steps

If the amendments are supported, the planning proposal will be submitted to the Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) seeking Gateway determination. After any further technical studies are finished post gateway, the amendment would then proceed to public authority consultation, followed by public exhibition. During public exhibition, landowners, developers, and other interested parties would be able to lodge a submission.

It is recognised that a further planning proposal and DCP amendment will be required upon Council completing preliminary investigations around the Fifteenth Avenue Smart Transit (FAST) corridor. It is likely that the land reservation acquisition corridor of Fifteenth Avenue will be widened, and adjacent land-use zones may change. Changes to the DCP road layout are also likely as a result of this process. This planning proposal and SEPP amendment generally deals with matters which are time sensitive and minor in nature. Given that further consideration of potential land-uses surrounding the FAST corridor have not been carried out, nor the final width of the corridor resolved, this will be dealt with in a separate amendment.

 

Financial Implications

The implementation of WSUD elements and LATM provisions will present a higher up-front cost for street design and construction for developers. There will also be on-going maintenance costs associated with maintaining tree pits, rain gardens and replacing damaged pavers. However, some of these costs may be off-set by the reduced costs of maintaining “end-of-catchment” bio-retention facilities and LATM features are far more expensive to retrofit once a street has been constructed. The benefits of increased neighbourhood amenity and reduced urban heat load are not easily quantifiable but should also be considered.

It is proposed that the design solution which incorporates stormwater treatment in the road corridor will off-set the need for Council to acquire land and construct stormwater rain gardens. As such, these facilities can be removed from Council’s Contributions Plan, reducing the amount payable by developers to Council.

Any contributions collected to date for the purpose of raingardens will still need to be utilised for that purpose. In some instances, these funds may be used to retrofit recently completed streets to the new standard where additional water quality treatment is required. In other cases the funds may be utilised to provide an end-of-catchment raingarden where this is both hydraulically feasible and economically efficient. The treatment method will need to be assessed on a case-by-case basis for interim developments.

 

 

Conclusion

 

It is recommended that the planning proposal be supported by Council and be forwarded to the Department of Planning & Environment for a Gateway determination. It is also recommended that, subject to a Gateway determination, the draft DCP be placed on exhibition concurrently with the planning proposal.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Deliver and maintain a range of transport related infrastructure such as footpaths, bus shelters and bikeways.

Deliver a high quality local road system including provision and maintenance of infrastructure and management of traffic issues.

Environment

Manage the environmental health of waterways.

Manage air, water, noise and chemical pollution.

Protect, enhance and maintain areas of endangered ecological communities and high quality bushland as part of an attractive mix of land uses.

Support the delivery of a range of transport options.


Social

Support policies and plans that prevent crime.


Civic Leadership

Act as an environmental leader in the community.

Legislative

Environmental Planning & Assessment Act 1979

State Environmental Planning Policy (Sydney Region Growth Centres) 2006

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Attachment 1 - ALN ILP Amendment Maps & Description (Under separate cover)

2.         Attachment 2 - DRAFT Planning Proposal - Austral and Leppington North ILP & DCP Amendment (Under separate cover)

3.         Attachment 3 - Amended Liverpool Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan (Austral ILP Amendment) March 2019 (Under separate cover)

4.         Attachment 4 - Schedule 1 Liverpool Growth Centre Precinct Amending Development Control Plan (Austral ILP Amendment) (Under separate cover)

5.         Attachment 5 - LPP Advice (Under separate cover)  


107

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 07

Moorebank R4 zoning - Findings of community engagement

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Encourage community participation in decision-making

File Ref

059282.2019

Report By

Michael Midson - Executive Planner

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At the Ordinary Council meeting on 6 February 2019, Council considered a Notice of Motion regarding the R4 (High Density Residential) zone (R4 zone) in Moorebank, where it was resolved that Council:

 

1.   Notes that a proposal to rezone/downzone the current R4 in Moorebank could have been called for by any Councillor since September 2008;

2.   Immediately write to the residents of Moorebank by way of direct mail correcting the original letter sent and making it clear that it is the Councillors responsibility to make recommendations for any zoning changes in the Moorebank area;

3.   Immediately start separate community consultation with the residents of Moorebank with a view of reducing the density in the R4 zone; and

4.   Present these findings to Council at the March meeting.

 

A letter was sent to Moorebank residents on 19 February 2019 (Attachment 1). This letter included clarification on the rezoning process and invited residents to complete an online survey and to attend a community consultation session on the 7 March 2019 at the Moorebank Community Centre to express their views on the current zoning.

 

395 survey responses were received and approximately 112 people attended the community consultation session.

 

This report provides a summary of the findings resulting from the community consultation process as required by resolution 4 above.


 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.       Notes that a local housing strategy is currently being prepared as part of the LEP Review process; and

2.       Notes that a review of density and dwelling typologies will be undertaken as part of the LEP Review process.

 

 

 

REPORT

 

History of the R4 zone in Moorebank

 

In 2005, the NSW State Government released the City of Cities Metropolitan Strategy for Sydney. As part of this process, the State government identified a target for 20,000 new dwellings for Liverpool’s established urban areas.

 

In 2006, the State government introduced a standard Local Environmental Plan (LEP) template which sought to make the format and provisions of all LEP’s in NSW consistent. In response, Council undertook a review of the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 1997 (1997 LEP). As part of this process, a Residential Development Strategy (RDS) was adopted by Council in 2008 which identified strategies to achieve the State government target of 20,000 new dwellings in the existing urban area of the Liverpool LGA.

 

The RDS recommended the introduction of medium and high density zones around a number of centres across the Liverpool LGA including around the Moorebank shopping centre (see Figure 1).

 

Figure 1 – Zoning map

 

There are currently 293 properties in the Moorebank R4 zone including strata units, or 247 properties excluding strata units. Records indicate that a high proportion (approximately 70%) of these properties (excluding strata units) have transferred ownership since 2008.

 

Since 2008, five development applications for residential flat buildings in Moorebank have been approved, of these two have received occupation certificates. There are currently seven development applications under assessment including:

 

·    DA-49/2019  - 2 Kalimna Street, Moorebank

·    DA-627/2018 - 23 Harvey Ave, Moorebank

·    DA-314/2017 - 2-4 Travers Street, Moorebank

·    DA-1248/2016 - 101 Nuwarra Road, Moorebank

·    DA-552/2018  - 31 Harvey Ave, Moorebank

·    DA-100/2017 - 14 McKay Avenue, Moorebank

·    DA-995/2017  - 32 McKay Avenue, Moorebank                                                                                                                                                     

 

 

 

 

 

Demographic Profile 

 

According to the 2016 ABS Census, the suburb of Moorebank had a total population of 9,750 people and 3,290 dwellings in 2016. The majority of dwellings were separate houses (85.3%) followed by medium and high density dwellings (14.4%). In 2016, 28.5% of people owned their home, 49% were purchasing (have mortgages), and 17.1% were renting. Couples with children was the highest household type (46.6%) followed by couples without children (22.6%), lone person households (13.6%), single parent families (11.2%), and group households (1.3%).

 

Survey findings

 

In February 2019, Council commenced a community survey on ‘Liverpool Listens’ to better understand the community’s thoughts and ideas about current and future land uses in Moorebank. In particular, the survey asked residents whether they would like to reduce the current high density (R4) zoned land.

 

Summary of results

 

There were 395 responses to the survey.  A diverse range of age groups are represented. The majority of respondents (78.6%) live outside of the R4 zone. The majority of respondents own their property (90.8%).

 

The survey indicates strong opposition to the current R4 zone with 78.2% of respondents strongly against the R4 zone (see Figure 2).

 

Figure 2 – Respondent level of support for the current R4 zone

 

There were approximately 75 respondents (19.3% of total respondents) who said they live in the R4 zone. Respondents in this group were largely opposed to the R4 zone, while there was also a relatively significant group who strongly supported the zone (See Figure 3).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3 – Respondent level of support for the current R4 land (Respondents who live in the R4 zone)

 

Summary of reasons given for strong opposition to the R4 zone

 

(Not in any particular order)

 

·    Lack of supporting infrastructure and services (especially public transport);  

·    Concern about traffic congestion (existing and potential);

·    Lack of parking in the area (on street, commuter, and at Moorebank Shopping Centre);

·    Concerns about local character and amenity;

·    Concerns about changes to community profile;

·    Concerns about building design including height and scale;

·    Concern about pollution from additional road users; and

·    Need for the Moorebank Shopping Centre to be upgraded.

 

 

 

Summary of reasons given for strong support for the R4 zone

 

(Not in any particular order)

 

·    Impacts on property values;

·    Improving housing affordability;

·    A need to increase housing supply;

·    Providing a greater choice of housing in the area;

·    Apartments have already been built and approved – concern about amenity impacts of neighbouring lots if land is downzoned; and

·    Provides an opportunity for more economic growth in the area.

 

Summary of the desired future of Moorebank

 

(Not in any particular order)

 

·    No high rise buildings;

·    Family friendly;

·    Peaceful, relaxed, safe and quiet;

·    Easily accessible (less congestion, improved public transport and parking

·    Homes with backyards;

·    Upgraded and well maintained community facilities; and

·    Upgraded shopping centre / restaurants.

 

Summary of preferred actions from Council

 

Respondents were asked to rank options to address the density issue in Moorebank.

 

On balance, the ranking of options is as follows:

 

1.   Rezone R4 land to medium density residential.

2.   Reduce the extent of the R4 zone.

3.   Review the permissible height and scale of buildings.

4.   Redistribute the current density across a larger area.

5.   Rezone R4 land to medium density residential and identify other areas in Moorebank for R4 land.

 

Community Consultation Event 

 

A community consultation event was held on 7 March 2019 at the Moorebank Community Centre between 6pm and 8pm. Approximately 112 people attended.

 

The event provided an opportunity for residents to discuss their thoughts and ideas about the Moorebank R4 zone directly with senior Council staff. Councillors were also invited to the event. Residents also had an opportunity to complete the survey at the event and to participate in an engagement activity to post their thoughts and ideas about the future of Moorebank. A summary of the feedback from this event is provided in Attachment 2.

 

Key considerations for downzoning residential land

 

The following are key considerations for any proposal to downzone land:

 

·    Downzoning land and reducing development potential may have a negative impact on land and property values.

 

·    Ministerial Directions (issued under Section 9.1 (formally s.117) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979) stipulates that a planning proposal must not contain provisions which will reduce the permissible residential density of land. A planning proposal may be inconsistent with the terms of this direction if Council can satisfy the Secretary of the Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) that the provisions of the proposal are justified by a strategy or study or is of minor significance. A copy of the Ministerial Direction is included in Attachment 3.

 

·    Council is undertaking a Local Housing Strategy which will inform the review of the Liverpool LEP 2008, which can be used as the basis for any rezoning decisions.

 

·    Since 2008, five development applications for residential flat buildings in Moorebank have been approved, of these two have received occupation certificates. There are currently seven development applications under assessment by Council. Planning law requires that any development applications lodged prior to any change to the LEP must be assessed and determined in accordance with the zoning and development standards applying before the change. There is a risk that there will be an influx of development applications for apartment buildings in the area to take up the development potential in the existing development controls. Therefore it will be important to carefully consider this likely outcome and the resulting built form and urban design issues in any rezoning proposal.

 

·    Should downzoning occur, it is likely that a savings and / or transitional provision would be required to be included in the LEP to afford landowners an opportunity to lodge development applications under the current planning provisions.

 

Proposed Way Forward

 

Council is undertaking an accelerated review of the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008, including the preparation of a Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) and a Local Housing Strategy (LHS). The LHS is an LGA wide strategy and will review the density and dwelling typologies in Moorebank, together with other locations across the established areas.

 

The accelerated LEP Review process provides an opportunity to undertake an evidence based review of housing typology and density in Moorebank and other parts of the Liverpool LGA. The draft LSPS will be adopted by Council and publicly exhibited in July 2019 and the draft LEP will be reported to Council by September 2019 and will be on public exhibition in early 2020.

 

Conclusion

 

The results of the community engagement process indicates there is strong opposition to the current R4 zone in Moorebank. There are specific concerns about the lack of supporting infrastructure and services as well as the impact on local character and amenity. Residents want their suburb to be family friendly, safe, easily accessible with upgraded and well maintained community facilities.

 

It is important to carefully review housing density and typology with an appropriate evidence base in order to comply with legislative requirements and to achieve a positive and balanced outcome. The accelerated LEP Review process (including the preparation of a local housing strategy) is the appropriate process to do that.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Regulate for a mix of housing types that responds to different population groups such as young families and older people.


Civic Leadership

Undertake communication practices with the community and stakeholders across a range of media.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Letter to Residents - Have Your Say on Residential Density in Moorebank

2.         Moorebank Community Consultation Session - Summary of Feedback

3.         Ministerial Direction - Housing, Infrastructure and Urban Development


115

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Moorebank R4 zoning - Findings of community engagement

Attachment 1

Letter to Residents - Have Your Say on Residential Density in Moorebank

 

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115

EGROW 07

Moorebank R4 zoning - Findings of community engagement

Attachment 2

Moorebank Community Consultation Session - Summary of Feedback

 

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117

EGROW 07

Moorebank R4 zoning - Findings of community engagement

Attachment 3

Ministerial Direction - Housing, Infrastructure and Urban Development

 

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125

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

Chief Executive Officer Report

 

CEO 01

Amendments to Code of Meeting Practice for public exhibition

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

044287.2019

Report By

George Georgakis - Manager Council and Executive Services

Approved By

Kiersten Fishburn - Chief Executive Officer

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Councils were sent a Circular from the Office of Local Government (OLG) on 18 December 2018 (attached to this report) to advise that a Model Meeting Code has been prescribed under the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 and the existing meetings provisions of the Regulation have been repealed.

 

Councils are required to adopt a Code of Meeting Practice that incorporates the mandatory provisions of the Model Meeting Code prescribed by the Regulation. A council’s adopted meeting code may also incorporate the non-mandatory provisions of the Model Meeting Code and any other supplementary provisions adopted by the council.

 

Until a council adopts a new code of meeting practice, its existing code of meeting practice will remain in force up until six months from the date on which the new Model Meeting Code was prescribed (14 December 2018 – 14 June 2019). 

 

Before adopting a new code of meeting practice, under section 361 of the LG Act, councils are required to exhibit a draft of the code of meeting practice for at least 28 days and provide members of the community at least 42 days in which to comment on the draft code. 

 

Council’s Management Team recommends that Council place the Model Code on public exhibition with some minor amendments, as permitted by the OLG, to incorporate some of the existing practices at Liverpool which are working well.

 

As part of the professional development training program for Councillors, it is recommended that Code of Meeting Practice training be arranged after the Code is adopted. Training will also be provided to members of Council Committees and relevant staff.

 

Proposed changes have been marked in the attached Code. The mandatory provisions are indicated in black font. Non-mandatory provisions are indicated in red font. A line struck through any red font indicates that it not be proposed to be included. Any proposed amendments are shown in green font.

 

The Model Meeting Code also applies to meetings of the boards of joint organisations and county councils. The provisions that are specific to meetings of boards of joint organisations are indicated in blue font. These provisions do not apply to Liverpool City Council and will be removed from Council’s Code.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.       Places the attached draft Code of Meeting Practice on public exhibition for 28 days and provides members of the community 42 days in which to comment; and

 

2.       Receives a further report to Council following the public consultation period, or if no submissions are received, delegate to the CEO to adopt the Code of Meeting Practice as exhibited. 

 

 

REPORT

 

Amendments made to the Local Government Act 1993 (LG Act) in August 2016 by the Local Government Amendment (Governance and Planning) Act 2016 provide for a model code of meeting practice to be prescribed by the Regulation.

 

Councils were sent a Circular from the Office of Local Government (OLG) on 18 December 2018 (attached to this report) to advise that a Model Meeting Code has been prescribed under the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 and the existing meetings provisions of the Regulation have been repealed.

 

The Model Meeting Code has two elements:

 

-     It contains mandatory provisions (indicated in black font) that reflect the existing meetings provisions of the Act and update and enhance the meetings provisions previously prescribed under the Regulation to reflect contemporary meetings practice by Councils; and

 

-     It contains non-mandatory provisions (indicated in red font) that cover areas of meetings practice that are common to most Councils but where there may be a need for some variation in practice between councils based on local circumstances. The non-mandatory provisions also operate to set a benchmark based on what the OLG sees as being best practice for the relevant area of practice. 

 

Councils are required to adopt a Code of Meeting Practice that incorporates the mandatory provisions of the Model Meeting Code prescribed by the Regulation. A council’s adopted meeting code must not contain provisions that are inconsistent with the mandatory provisions.

 

A council’s adopted meeting code may also incorporate the non-mandatory provisions of the Model Meeting Code and any other supplementary provisions adopted by the council.

 

Councils and committees of councils of which all the members are councillors must conduct their meetings in accordance with the Code of Meeting Practice adopted by the council.

 

Until a council adopts a new code of meeting practice, its existing code of meeting practice will remain in force up until six months from the date on which the new Model Meeting Code was prescribed (14 December 2018 – 14 June 2019).  If a council fails to adopt a new code of meeting practice within this period, under transitional provisions contained in the Regulation and the LG Act, any provision of the council’s adopted meeting code that is inconsistent with a mandatory provision of the Model Meeting Code prescribed under the Regulation will automatically cease to have any effect to the extent that it is inconsistent with the mandatory provision of the Model Meeting Code.

 

Before adopting a new code of meeting practice, under section 361 of the LG Act, councils are required to exhibit a draft of the code of meeting practice for at least 28 days and provide members of the community at least 42 days in which to comment on the draft code. 

 

The OLG’s Model Code of Meeting Practice has been copied into Liverpool City Council’s Policy template style and is attached to this report. 

 

Also attached is the OLG’s Circular on the commencement of the new Code of Meeting Practice for Local Councils in NSW.

 

Council’s Management Team recommend that Council place the Model Code on public exhibition with some minor amendments, as permitted by the OLG, to incorporate some of the existing practices at Liverpool which are working well.

 

As part of the professional development training program for Councillors, it is recommended that Code of Meeting Practice training be arranged. Training will also be provided to members of Council Committees and relevant staff.

 

Commentary in relation to various clauses including non-mandatory clauses

 

Proposed changes have been marked in the attached Code. The mandatory provisions are indicated in black font. Non-mandatory provisions are indicated in red font. A line struck through any red font indicates that it not be proposed to include. Any proposed amendments are shown in green font.

 

The Model Meeting Code also applies to meetings of the boards of joint organisations and county councils. The provisions that are specific to meetings of boards of joint organisations are indicated in blue font. These provisions do not apply to Liverpool City Council and are to be removed from Council’s Code.

 

The reasoning behind proposed changes to the Model Code is outlined below:

 

-      Clauses 3.12 and 3.13

These non-mandatory clauses relate to the requirement for the CEO to submit a report to Council in certain circumstances to address issues pertaining to Notices of Motion.

 

It is recommended that this not be included, and the clause be replaced with a clause which outlines Council’s current practice, of providing a CEO comment with each Notice of Motion submitted.

 

-     Clauses 3.32 – 3.36

These non-mandatory clauses relate to Pre-Meeting Briefing Sessions to be held prior to each Ordinary Meeting. Council already holds Councillors Briefing Session in the week preceding Ordinary Meetings and has adopted a Councillor Briefing Procedure (most recently adopted at the 21 November 2018 Council Meeting). As such, it is recommended that our existing practice be continued and there is no need to include reference to it in the Meeting Code. 

 

-     Clauses 4.1- 4.23

These non-mandatory clauses relate to the holding of a Public Forum session prior to each ordinary meeting of Council for the purpose of hearing oral submissions from members of the public.

 

Council staff do not support these non-mandatory provisions and recommend they be replaced with Council’s current practice of holding the Public Forum Session as part of the meeting, prior to discussion of Agenda items, rather than being held prior to each Council meeting.

 

The Public Forum clauses from Council’s current Code of Meeting Practice have therefore been included into the attached draft Code.

This approach is consistent with Council’s position when it considered the OLG’s Consultation draft paper on the proposed Model Meeting Code at its meeting on 28 February 2018.

 

  Clauses 5.14 – 5.15

These non-mandatory clauses allow for the cancellation of a meeting under certain circumstances. 

            It is recommended that these non-mandatory clauses be included in the Meeting          Code. 

 

-     Clause 5.21

This mandatory clause requires the chairperson to make a statement at the start of each meeting informing those in attendance that the meeting is being webcast and that those in attendance should refrain from making any defamatory statements.

 

 

This is a mandatory clause and as such will be included in the Meeting Code. It 

should be noted however, that the Public Forum section of the Council meeting is not 

webcast in accordance with the Council resolution from 30 May 2018. 

 

-      Clause 5.24

       This mandatory clause states that the CEO is entitled to attend a meeting of any other committee of the Council and may, if a member of the committee, exercise a vote.

       This is a mandatory clause and as such will be included in the Meeting Code. A sentence will be added however to advise that the CEO (and any staff member) is not a voting member of any Committee of Council, in accordance with the resolution of Council from 30 August 2017.

 

-      Clauses 7.1 – 7.4

       These non-mandatory clauses relate to the Modes of Address at the meeting for the Chairperson, Councillors and Council staff.

 

       All attendees at Liverpool City Council meetings are addressed appropriately and in the interests of not making the Meeting Code longer than necessary, it is recommended they not be included in the Code.

 

-      Clauses 8.1 and 8.2

       The above clauses relates to the Order of Business for Ordinary Council Meetings. The Meeting Code is to either state that the order of business is as fixed by resolution of the Council or alternatively shall list the order of business.

       It is recommended that Council continue with listing the Order of Business in our Meeting Code as per the existing Meeting Code (ie. Incorporate Clause 8.2 in the Code).

 

-      Clause 9.10

       Similar to Clauses 3.12 and 3.13, this non-mandatory clause relates to the requirement for the CEO to submit a report to Council in certain circumstances to address issues pertaining to Mayoral Minutes.

       It is recommended that this not be included. The CEO can instead provide a comment at the Council meeting.

 

-      Clause 9.17

       This mandatory clause relates to Questions at Council meetings and states:

       “A Councillor or Council employee to whom a question is put is entitled to be given reasonable notice of the question and, in particular, sufficient notice to enable reference to be made to other persons or to documents. Where a Councillor or Council employee to who a question is put is unable to response to the question at the meeting at which it is put, they may take it on notice and report the responses to the next meeting of the Council”.

 

       It is recommended at this clause be amended so that the response be provided to Councillors via the CEO update as is the current practice, which leads to a response before the next Council meeting, and doesn’t hold up business at the subsequent Council meeting.  

 

-      Clause 10.9

       Similar to Clauses 3.12 and 3.13 regarding Notice of Motions and Clause 9.10 regarding      Mayoral Minutes, this non-mandatory clause refers to deferral of consideration of a motion or amendment if it requires the expenditure of funds on works and/or services other than those already provided for in Council’s current adopted operational plan, and doesn’t specify the source of funding for the expenditure. In those instance, the non-mandatory clause requires the CEO to submit a report to Council on the availability of funds for implementing the motion if adopted.

 

       It is recommended that this non-mandatory clause not be included. Staff can endeavour to respond at the meeting or the motion can be altered to ask for a report (to be prepared if the motion is adopted).

 

-      Clause 11.11

This non-mandatory clause requires the voting of all members on all motions or amendments put at Council meetings to be recorded in the minutes.

 

       It is recommended that this clause be included in the Meeting Code.

 

       This is consistent with Council’s resolution from 28 February 2018 when it provided feedback to the OLG on the Consultation Draft Meeting Code document supporting the provisions regarding recording the voting of all members for all motions and amendments in the minutes of Council and Committee meetings.

 

-      Clauses 13.1 - 13.7

       These non-mandatory clauses outline how to deal with multiple items of business on the agenda together by way of a single resolution, and dealing with certain items by exception.

 

       Council does this well, particularly when dealing with Committee reports, and in the interests of not making the Meeting Code longer than necessary, it is recommended they not be included in the Code.

 

-      Clauses 14.9 – 14.17

       These mandatory clauses outline how members of the public may make representations as to whether part of a meeting should be closed.

 

       Consistent with Council’s current practice, the deadline to make such representations is to be 5pm the day preceding the Council meeting and speakers approved will be provided with 3 minutes to address the meeting, with an extension provided if resolved to do so by Council at the meeting. Two speakers (one for and one against) to be permitted to address Council (as to whether an item should be considered in closed session).

 

-      Clauses 15.14 - 15.16

       These non-mandatory clauses deal with expulsion of persons from a meeting.

 

       Clause 15.14 states:

       “All Chairpersons of meetings of the Council and Committees of the Council are authorised under this Code to expel any persons, including any Councillor, from a Council or Committee meeting, for the purpose of Section 10(2)(b) of the LGAct”.

 

       Clause 15.15 states:

       “All Chairpersons of meetings of the Council and Committees of the council are authorised under this code to expel any person other than a Councillor, form a Council or Committee meeting, for the purposes of Section 10(2)(b) of the LGAct. Councillors may only be expelled by resolution of the Council or the Committee of the Council. 

 

       The model code states that Councils may use either clause 15.14 or clause 15.15. 

 

       It is recommended that Clause 15.14 be included in the Meeting Code. This would make the meeting procedure consistent with that of State and Federal Houses where the Chair is permitted to expel anyone.   

      

       Further, it should also be noted that Clause 15.16 states:

 

       “Clause 14.14/15.15 (delete whichever is not applicable), does not limit the ability of the Council or a Committee of the Council to resolve to expel a person, including a Councillor, from a Council or Committee meeting, under Section 10(2)(a) of the LGAct.”

 

-      Clause 17.10

       Clause 17.10 is a non-mandatory clause and states:

 

       “A notice of motion to alter or rescind a resolution relating to a development application must be submitted to the CEO no later than (Council to specify the period of time) after the meeting at which the resolution was adopted”.

 

       As development applications are no longer submitted to Council meetings, it is recommended that the above clause not be included in the Meeting Code.

 

-      Clause 17.12

       This non-mandatory clause outlines how, in cases of urgency, a motion to alter or rescind a resolution of the Council may be moved at the same meeting at which the resolution was adopted.

 

       A similar provision is currently included in Council’s current Code of Meeting Practice.

       It is recommended that the above clause be included in the Meeting Code and amended slightly by adding a 30 minute notice period (as per Council’s current Code), for a Rescission Motion to be considered at the same meeting. 

 

-      Clause 17.15

       This non-mandatory clause provides for a Councillor to move to recommit a resolution adopted at the same meeting to either:

 

Correct an error, ambiguity or imprecision in the Council’s resolution; or

To confirm the voting on the resolution.

 

       It is recommended that this non-mandatory clause be included in the Meeting Code. 

 

-      Clauses 18.1 – 18.5

       These non-mandatory clauses outline when meetings are to conclude and the circumstances in which they can either be extended, business deferred to the next meeting, or the meeting adjourned to another date.

 

       It is recommended that this clause be amended to make it consistent with the current Meeting Code whereby Council meetings are to commence at 6.00pm and conclude by 11.00pm without an extension.

 

       Further, as per the current Meeting Code, it is recommended that the following clause be added to this section:

 

       “Staff required to attend Council meetings will be instructed by their immediate supervisor to commence work on the day of the scheduled Council meeting at a time that will ensure that their ordinary hours at work shall not exceed 12 hours in one day exclusive of unpaid meal breaks. The affected staff should not resume duty without receiving 10 consecutive hours off duty.”

 

-      Clause 20.24

  This non-mandatory clause requires that all voting at Committee meetings by all members is included in the minutes.

 

       This is similar to Clause 11.11 (for Council meetings) and it is recommended that this clause be included in the Meeting Code.

 

       This is consistent with Council’s resolution from 28 February 2018 when it provided feedback to the OLG on the Consultation Draft Meeting Code document supporting the provisions regarding recording the voting of all members for all motions and amendments in the minutes of Council and Committee meetings.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

 

Legislative

Sections 360 and 361 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         OLG Circular 18-45 - Commencement of the new Model Code of Meeting Practice for Local Councils in NSW (Under separate cover)

2.         Draft Code of Meeting Practice (Under separate cover)  


127

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

Chief Executive Officer Report

 

CEO 02

Council Resolution to Adopt Recipient of Funds from 2019 Charity Ball

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

058637.2019

Report By

George Georgakis - Manager Council and Executive Services

Approved By

Kiersten Fishburn - Chief Executive Officer

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At the Council meeting on 27 February 2019 Council resolved to note the recommendations of the Civic Advisory Committee minutes. One of the recommendations related to endorsing the recommended recipient to be the beneficiary of funds from the 2019 Liverpool City Council Charity Ball.

 

The report is prepared to obtain a resolution from Council on the chosen recipient of funds from the 2019 Charity Ball.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council endorses the Civic Advisory Committee’s recommendation for the Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research to be the recipient of the funds raised at the 2019 Liverpool City Council Charity Ball.

 

 

REPORT

 

At the Council meeting on 27 February 2019 Council considered a report on the Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee Meeting held on 1 February 2019.

 

At that meeting Council resolved to:

 

1.   Receive and note the Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee Meeting held on 1 February 2019;

2.   Note the recommendations in the Minutes; and

3.   Adopt the amended Civic Advisory Committee Charter attached to the report.

 

Item 6 of the Committee Minutes related to the “Nominations of Beneficiaries for Funds raised from the 2019 Liverpool City Council Charity Ball”.

 

The Committee recommended that the Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research be the recipient of the funding raised by the 2019 Liverpool City Council Charity Ball.

 

As the Committee’s recommendations were noted at the Council meeting on 27 February 2019, this report is submitted to obtain a resolution from Council on the chosen recipient. It is recommended that the Committee’s recommendation of the Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research be endorsed.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


129

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

Chief Executive Officer Report

 

CEO 03

Enterprise Risk Management Policy

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

055771.2019

Report By

George Hampouris - Head of Audit Risk and Improvement 

Approved By

Kiersten Fishburn - Chief Executive Officer

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council’s Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) Policy has been revised in conjunction with the development of a Risk Management Strategy to support it. These have been developed to provide a clearer framework and roadmap in relation to ERM. The draft ERM Policy is now, therefore, submitted to Council for adoption.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Adopts the Draft Enterprise Risk Management Policy attached to this report; and

2.   Notes the Enterprise Risk Management Strategy attached to this report.

 

 

REPORT

 

The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) Policy communicates Liverpool City Council’s commitment to maintaining a robust and effective risk management framework to help promote a positive risk culture and proactively manage enterprise wide risks to support the achievement of Council’s strategic and operational objectives. The Policy highlights the core components of the ERM framework in place and provides an outline of responsibilities.

 

The ERM Strategy has been developed to assist with the development of Council’s risk maturity, providing a constructive and accessible reference for managing risks and detailing LCC risk tables and statements. The Strategy is a living document and will be updated from time to time as the risk profile and strategic priorities evolves. The Audit, Risk and Improvement Unit will monitor the success of risk initiatives and Council’s risk culture and make recommendations pertaining to the re-alignment of Council’s approach and risk tables as required. As part of good governance, any change to the Strategy will be tabled to the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee for approval.

 

 

As part of the development of the Policy and Strategy, Internal Audit has consulted Council’s Chief Executive Officer and City Corporate (Governance), and gained endorsement from Council’s Executive Management Team and the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee. 

    

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Operate a well developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

Local Government Act 1993, sections 8B and 23A

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Enterprise Risk Management Policy (Under separate cover)

2.         Enterprise Risk Management Strategy (Under separate cover)   


131

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City Community and Culture Report

 

COM 01

Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Implement access and equity for all members of the community

File Ref

038303.2019

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Tina Sangiuliano - Acting Director City Community and Culture

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council is committed to building strong and resilient communities in the Liverpool Local Government Area (LGA) and to maximising social wellbeing. Council helps achieve these goals by providing financial support through grants and sponsorships to develop leadership skills, increase participation in community activities and address identified social issues.

 

This report presents the funding recommendations for the Corporate Sponsorship (Outgoing) Program for Council’s consideration. The report also includes notification of approved Quick Response Grants, as per the Grants and Donations Policy (7.2.1) ‘Recommendations for funding of $1,000 or less may be approved by the CEO or their delegate, provided the financial assistance is in accordance with sections 356(3), 377(1A), and 378 of the Local Government Act 1993. Council will be notified of funded projects by a report to Council as soon as appropriately possible’.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council endorses the funding recommendation of $15,000 (GST exclusive) under the Corporate Sponsorship (Outgoing) Program for the following projects:

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Vedic Festival Incorporated

Festival of Chariots

$10,000

Pakistan Multicultural Services of Australia NSW Incorporated

Ramadan Eid Bazaar Festival

$ 5,000

 

 


 

REPORT

 

Corporate Sponsorship

The Corporate Sponsorship (Outgoing) Program received three applications two of which met the eligibility criteria and are recommended for funding as outlined below:

 

Applicant

Vedic Festival Incorporated

Location

Liverpool

Organisation

Other Incorporated Entity

Project

Festival of Chariots

Bigge Park, Saturday 6 July 2019 from 10:00am – 4:00pm

 

Amount Requested

$10,000

Description

Objectives

A festival consisting of a street parade and a carnival fair in Bigge Park.  The event is free and open to all the communities to celebration and respect the art, cultural heritage, unity among diverse communities, and diversity within the Liverpool LGA.

 

Outcomes

§ Community strengthening, bringing many cultures of Liverpool area together;

§ Showcase art, culture and history of the Indian community; and

§ Promotes tolerance and peaceful co-existence of the many cultures in Liverpool.

Beneficiaries

§ 5,000 + residents

Assessment

Recommended for Funding - $10,000

The applicant’s event aligns with the ‘Community Strategic Plan Directions 1 Creating Connections and meets the Corporate Sponsorship (Outgoing) Programs funding benefits and outcomes. The event delivers a community event, implementing access and equity for all members of the community and by celebrating diversity.

4.2.1 Economic benefit: a); b); & d).

§ Delivers significant economic benefit to the Liverpool LGA;

§ Delivers benefit to tourism, hospitality and retail sectors through the attendance; and

§ Attracts national or international attention to Liverpool as a place to reside, visit, work and/or invest.

 

4.2.2 Community, cultural, and social benefit; a); & b).

§ Provides and promote Liverpool’s cultural diversity and celebrate our City’s uniqueness; and

§ Enhances Liverpool’s profile and reputation as an outward looking, creative and connected city.

 

 

5.1 Expected program outcomes: a); b); & d).

§ Provide an opportunity for measurable economic, social, environmental and/or cultural benefits to Council and the Liverpool LGA;

§ Provide opportunities for the community to participate and contribute in activities/events in the Liverpool LGA; and

§ Provide extensive coverage and promotional/publicity opportunities across a range of media outlets.

 

Applicant

Pakistan Multicultural Services of Australia NSW Incorporated

Location

Liverpool

Organisation

Other Incorporated Entity

Project

Ramadan Eid Bazaar Festival

Whitlam Leisure Centre, 90A Memorial Avenue, Saturday 1 June 2019 from 3:00pm – late

Amount Requested

$5,000

Description

Objectives

Deliver a festival, open to all the residents of Liverpool LGA, celebrating the traditional end of Ramadan. The festival is free to the community and visitors to Liverpool, full of activities, rides, food, multicultural community stalls, and entertainment. The event will take place at the Whitlam Leisure Centre.

 

Outcomes

§ Provide an environment where communities and cultures can interact with each other;

§ Opportunity for local businesses to benefit financially;

§ Activate an opportunity for tourism in Liverpool, holding a successful annual event; and

§ Promotes tolerance and understanding in Liverpool’s diverse community.

Beneficiaries

§ 5,000 residents and visitors to the Liverpool LGA

§ Local Businesses

Assessment

Recommended for Funding - $5,000

The applicant’s event aligns with the ‘Community Strategic Plan Directions 1. Creating Connections and 3. Generating Opportunity, meets the Corporate Sponsorship (Outgoing) Programs funding benefits and outcomes. The event has been successfully held at Whitlam Park for the past 9 years and has attracted visitors to the Liverpool LGA.

4.2.1 Economic benefit: a); b); & d).

§ Delivers significant economic benefit to the Liverpool LGA;

§ Delivers benefit to tourism, hospitality and retail sectors through the attendance of regional, national, or international delegates at events; and

 

§ Attracts national or international attention to Liverpool as a place to reside, visit, work and/or invest.

 

4.2.2 Community, cultural, and social benefit: a); b); & c).

§ Provides and promote Liverpool’s cultural diversity and celebrate our City’s uniqueness;

§ Enhances Liverpool’s profile and reputation as an outward looking, creative and connected city; and

§ Creates opportunities for education and information exchange between Council, the community and the sector.

 

5.1 Expected program outcomes: a); b); d) & e).

§ Provide an opportunity for measurable economic, social, environmental and/or cultural benefits to Council and the Liverpool LGA;

§ Provide opportunities for the community to participate and contribute in activities/events in the Liverpool LGA;

§ Provide extensive coverage and promotional/publicity opportunities across a range of media outlets; and

§ Promote Council’s reputation as a great place to live, visit, work, and invest.

 

The following applicant failed to meet the Corporate Sponsorship Program priorities. The applicant will be notified and invited to meet with the Community Development team to discuss ways of strengthening future applications when applying for Council support.

 

Applicant

Youth of Tomorrow Limited

Location

Homebush

Organisation

Australian Public Company

Project

School Education Program

Amount Requested

$ 4,620.00

Description

Objectives

The sponsorship requested is for the cost of bus transport for year 6 students to attend a tennis and educational program at Sydney Olympic Park Tennis Centre.  

Assessment

Not Recommended for Funding

The applicant does not demonstrate or clearly describe how the proposed project meets the eligibility and priorities in the ‘Corporate Sponsorship Policy’: 

 

 

Program Eligibility and Conditions 7.2 c)

§ Funding will not be provided to projects that do not address the identified directions of the Liverpool LGA as set out in Council’s Community Strategic Plan or do not address or comply with clause 4.2.

 

Policy Statement 4.2: 1; 2; & 3.

§ Applications to Council for sponsorship must address at least one of the following Corporate Sponsorship Program priorities:

1.   Economic benefit;

2.   Community, cultural, and social benefit; and

3.   Environmental benefit.

Applicant did not:

§ Demonstrate effectively the link between tennis and the history of Gallipoli and why the event needs to take place outside of the LGA - the project will be held at the Sydney Olympic Park Tennis Centre;

§ Demonstrate an opportunity for measurable economic, social, environmental and / or cultural benefit to Council and the Liverpool LGA - applicant did not demonstrate any link to the Corporate Sponsorship priorities;

§ Provide extensive coverage and promotional/publicity opportunities across a range of media outlets - applicant has included a point that advertising will not take place for the project; and

§ Promote Council's reputation as a great place to live, visit, work and invest – the project is being held outside of the Liverpool LGA with no advertising or promotional material.

Grants up to $1000

As per the Grants and Donations Policy (7.2.1) ‘Recommendations for funding of $1,000 or less may be approved by the CEO or their delegate, provided the financial assistance is in accordance with sections 356(3), 377(1A), and 378 of the Local Government Act 1993. Council will be notified of funded projects by a report to Council as soon as appropriately possible’.

 

Council received two Quick Response Grant applications, which met the policy criteria and were approved by the CEO for funding.

Applicant

Project

Amount approved

The City of Liverpool & District Historical Society

Environmental Control

$500

Liverpool & District Historical Society occupies space known as “The Bunker” at Liverpool Library. The society is in urgent need of a new dehumidifier to control the environment, ensuring the preservation of the collection of historical artefacts.

 

 

 

 

Applicant

Project

Amount approved

KM Sanowar Ali

Ethical Tee

$500

Ethical Tee is a new Australian business dedicated to offering ethically sourced and environmentally friendly garments in Australia and in the Pacific. We advocate for improved working conditions for factory workers overseas. Garments are printed in Australia and target to employ workers from socially disadvantaged groups. Customers can design their own tee shirts, polos, singlets, muscle tees and hoodies online.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

Economic

 

 

CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP (OUTGOING)

Budget allocation

Current balance

Recommended amounts this report:

Remaining budget

$100,000

$18,728

$15,000

$3,728

COMMUNITY GRANTS

Budget allocation

Current balance

Quick Response Grants Endorsed by CEO:

Remaining budget

$102,000

$90,500

$1,000

$89,500

MATCHING GRANTS

Budget allocation

Current balance

No recommended amounts this report:

Remaining budget

$200,000

$158,200

n/a

$158,200

* SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT GRANTS

Budget allocation

Current balance

No recommended amounts this report:

Remaining budget

$75,000

$48,604

n/a

$48,604

 

 

 

 

COMBINED FUNDING BALANCE

Combined allocation

Combined balance

Total recommended and endorsed amounts:

Remaining budget

$477,000

$316,032

$16,000

$300,032

* Sustainable Grants funding is via a rate levy and is only eligible to be used for the Sustainable Environment Grants Program.

Environment

There are no environmental considerations.

Social

Support community organisations and groups to deliver services.

Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Local Government Act 1993 - s356.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Corporate Sponsorship (Outgoing) Policy (Under separate cover)

2.         Grants and Donations Policy (Under separate cover)  


137

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City Community and Culture Report

 

COM 02

Delegation to Sister City Regione Calabria

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Celebrate diversity, promote inclusion and recognise heritage

File Ref

058687.2019

Report By

Dany Ngov - Policy and Projects Officer

Approved By

Tina Sangiuliano - Acting Director City Community and Culture

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has had a sister city relationship with Calabria since 1993. This relationship was formalised following a resolution of Council on 26 July 1993. The proposal to establish the relationship was in part due to a community of Italians generally, and Calabrians specifically, who have made Liverpool their home.

 

Since the formalisation of the relationship, sporadic connections have been made between Calabria and Liverpool. These have included visits from dignitaries from Calabria to Liverpool and delegations from Council visiting Calabria.

 

In recent years, Councillors, previous Calabrian delegates and local Italian business people have expressed the desire to strengthen our sister city relationship and to foster stronger cultural links between our two cities.

 

Following a Mayoral Minute presented to the 27 February 2019 Council meeting, Council resolved to report on the cultural connections between Roccella and Liverpool in response to an invitation received from the Mayor of Roccella to visit the city to attend a cultural festival, which includes a blessing of the fleet and other cultural activities in early July 2019.

 

This report recommends Council facilitate arrangements for a delegation from Liverpool to Calabria that will include a visit to Roccella in acceptance of the Mayor of Roccella’s invitation, and to endorse expenditure to a maximum of $25,000.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1.       Receive and note the report on cultural connections between Roccella and Liverpool;

2.       Facilitate arrangements for a delegation from Liverpool to Calabria in July 2019 and with a report to come back to Council on the outcomes of the visit;

3.       Determine which Councillors will attend as members of the delegation; and 

4.       Endorse expenditure for this delegation of up to $25,000.

 

REPORT

 

Council has had a sister city relationship with Calabria since 1993. This relationship was formalised following a resolution of Council on 26 July 1993. The proposal to establish the relationship was in part due to a community of Italians generally, and Calabrians specifically, who have made Liverpool their home. Since this time Council has sent two delegations to Calabria and Council has received visits from Calabrian dignitaries to foster and strengthen their relationship.

 

In December 1995, Council hosted a successful student exchange program with 35 students accompanied by their parents and council officials from the Italian city. This program was received positively by the overseas participants with many at the time regarding “Liverpool as the gateway to Australia, establishing Liverpool as a distinguished city in Sydney’s greater west. The first-time venture has positively strengthened and perpetuated [Council’s] rapport with our Italian Sister City”, quoted Marissa Sgambellone, Liverpool spokesperson for the exchange, in a Liverpool Leader article from 24 January 1996.

 

In October 1996, Council sent a delegation to Calabria, which included Liverpool Mayor George Paciullo, Deputy Mayor Alex Sanchez, General Manager Brian Carr and Councillors Wendy Waller, Tony Pascale and Frank Oliveri. It was during this visit that George Paciullo and Calabrian President Guisseppe Nistico signed an agreement ratifying the sister city relationship. As reported in a Liverpool Leader article from 23 October 1996, the delegates were told by President Nistico that the agreement would involve student exchanges, scholarships, tourism and university involvement between the two cities. He also indicated the possibility of financial assistance from Europe being made available to Liverpool businesses that established themselves in southern Italy, using Calabria as a gateway to Europe. 

 

In 2011, Mayor Waller, during her previous term as Mayor, visited the area of Roccella in Calabria at her own expense. The mayors of both cities recognised that this visit demonstrated a commitment to fostering a strong sister city relationship for the benefit of their respective communities. At a Council meeting, both mayors acknowledged the significant contributions the Italian community has made and continues to make in Liverpool. At the time of the visit, Roccella was hosting an international jazz festival where people came from all over the world to attend and perform. Mayor Waller attended the festival and was impressed by the scale of and positive atmosphere at the international event.

 

In February 2015, Council hosted a Calabrian delegation visiting Australia to a morning tea at Casula Powerhouse.  The visiting group consisted of Father Rocco from St Francis of Paola Monastery (Calabria Italy) and his Religious Assistant (also a Journalist), Assunta Orlando. Whilst in Sydney Father Rocco conducted a mass for the Italian community devotees of St Francis at Mount Carmel Church in Liverpool. 

 

In recent years, Councillors, previous Calabrian delegates and local Italian business people have expressed the desire to reconnect with our sister city in Calabria and explore opportunities to develop and enhance the cultural relationship between the two cities in ways that are mutually beneficial. This could include arranging a delegation from Liverpool to Calabria or hosting a Calabrian delegation to Liverpool.

 

If a delegation were to come to Liverpool, relevant cultural activities in Liverpool to participate in are:

 

·    Monthly Italian Film screenings with food in association with the Italian Institute of Culture. These will commence in April as part of the official Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre program for 2019.

·    Italian Food Fair delivered in collaboration with the CNA Italian Australian Services and Welfare Centre NSW Inc. The inaugural event was held on 18 February 2018 with plans to become an annual or bi-annual event, showcasing traditional culinary delights through cooking demonstrations and food stalls, traditional Italian performances and cultural displays and exhibitions. Last years’ event was attended by Mayor Waller, several councillors as well as MPs Anne Stanley and Paul Lynch.

 

The CNA Italian Australian Services and Welfare Centre NSW Inc. (CNA) are an organisation that provides support to the ageing Italian-Australian and multicultural community in the Liverpool LGA and promotes the Italian language and culture to the younger generation. Programs offered by CNA include the following amongst other services:

 

·    The Marco Polo Italian Language School, which provides weekly language classes to students in years K-6 ad operates from Council’s Greenway Park Community Centre.

·    A weekly day care program for elderly Italians called ‘Senior Life, Better Life’ provides opportunities for Italian elderly to socialise and participate in age and culturally appropriate activities on a regular basis.  The program operates weekly from the Carnes Hill Community Centre.

 

An invitation has been received from the Mayor of Roccella for a Liverpool delegation to visit the city to attend a cultural festival, which includes a blessing of the fleet and other cultural activities in early July 2019. In response to this invitation, and in the interest of maintaining a strong cultural connection and relationship between our two cities, it is proposed that a delegation be sent from Liverpool to Roccella to attend the Our Lady of Graces Feast amongst other cultural activities in Roccella. As suggested by the liaison of the Sister City Committee, it is proposed that a visit to Parliament in Rome be organised as part of the delegation visit. The official delegation is expected to be approximately four days.

 

In accordance with Council’s Civic Expenses and Facilities Policy: Council will send a delegation to a Sister City every two years, and Council will be represented by the Mayor, the CEO (or CEO’s nominee) and two other delegates as determined by Council.  Council will meet all reasonable costs associated with delegations to and from Sister Cities. Other Councils may join official delegations (with Mayor’s approval) but meet all their own costs except accommodation and other expenses agreed to by the host Sister City.

 

It is proposed this delegation would include the following attendees:

 

·    Mayor Waller; and

·    Craig Donarski, Director Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre

 

Other Councillors and Council support staff may be identified to join this delegation, with the attendees to be determined in accordance with the above policy.

 

An estimated cost for this delegation is up to $25,000, which includes travel costs, accommodation, transport, food, gifts and other incidental expenses. There is sufficient funding within the 2019/20 Sister City Program budget to cover this expenditure. 

 

It is recommended that Council commence facilitating arrangements for a delegation from Liverpool to Calabria that will include a visit to Roccella in acceptance of the Mayor of Roccella’s invitation, and to endorse expenditure to a maximum of $25,000.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

It is estimated a maximum of $25,000 will be required to facilitate this delegation. There is sufficient budget within the Sister City Program’s 2019/20 budget to cover this expenditure. 

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Strengthen cultural connections and foster the existing Sister City relationship established since 1993 with the Regione Calabria.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil  


141

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 01

Sydney Western City Planning Panel - Remuneration for Council representatives

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Encourage community participation in decision-making

File Ref

048462.2019

Report By

Glenn Schuil - Acting Coordinator Governance

Approved By

Chris White - Director City Corporate

 

 

Executive Summary

 

On 25 July 2011, Council considered a report that recommended remunerating Council representatives on Joint Regional Panels. The recommendation was based on the following advice by the then Minister for Planning, the Hon. Kristina Keneally MP:

 

As Councillors already receive an annual fee set by the Local Government Remuneration Tribunal each year for performing their Councillor duties, an additional per meeting fee of no more than $600 appears reasonable, recognising that membership of the Regional Panel will bring additional responsibilities.

 

The Council consequently resolved that:

 

Council pays members elected to represent Council on the Joint Regional Planning Panel a fee of $600 per meeting they attend.

 

On 23 February 2018, the Minister for Planning, the Hon Anthony Roberts MP, made a remuneration determination for members of local planning panels including, for a representative of the community, a minimum rate of $500 plus GST per meeting and $71 per hour for business that is undertaken outside of meetings. It is recommended that Council adopt the remuneration determined by the Minister.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:

 

1.       Council remunerates members elected to represent Council on the Sydney Western City Planning Panel a fee of $600 plus GST per meeting and $71 per hour plus GST for business that is undertaken outside of and not connected to a meeting, or alternatively their existing rate of remuneration if the person was a member of the panel immediately prior to 1 March 2018 and the existing rate is higher; and

 

2.       The meeting rate is to be inclusive of all work a panel member does for a meeting, including preparation, site visits, and attending the meeting including electronic meetings. The rate is to be paid if a member has carried out all work for a meeting but is unable to attend the meeting due to unforeseen circumstances.

 

 

REPORT

 

Joint Regional Planning Panels commenced operation on 1 July 2009 as part of the then planning reforms introduced by the Department of Planning. Council is represented on the Sydney Western City Planning Panel (SWCPP) by two of its Councillors, namely Mayor Waller and Clr Harle, with an alternate when the circumstance arises.

 

Councillors were paid a fee of $600 in accordance with a determination made by the then Minister for Planning, the Hon. Kristina Keneally, MP in July 2009.

 

On 23 February 2018 the Minister for Planning, the Hon Anthony Roberts MP, made the following remuneration determination for members of local planning panels:

 

in the case of the representative of the community or the alternate of a representative of the community –

 

·    a minimum of $500 plus GST per meeting and $71 per hour for business that is undertaken outside of meetings or

 

·    if the person was a member of that panel immediately prior to 1 March 2018, their existing rate of remuneration,

 

whichever is the higher.

 

The minimum per meeting rate is inclusive of all the work a panel member does for a meeting, including preparation, site visits, the meeting itself and any deliberation and voting by the panel on matters considered at the meeting once the meeting is closed.

 

The hourly rate applies to any business such as electronic determinations that the panel conducts that is not connected to one of its meetings.

 

All members are also entitled to their reasonable travel and out of pocket expenses.

 

A circumstance recently arose, where by a Council representative attended a site visit and a briefing in relation to a SWCPP meeting. However, the representative was unable to attend the SWCPP meeting that followed the site visit. Therefore, and under the original determination made by the Minister of Planning in July 2009, the representative was not entitled to a fee.

 

It is recommended that members who carry out all work for a meeting but are unable to attend the meeting itself are remunerated with the meeting fee.

 

It should be noted that in addition to ‘traditional’ meetings, the SWCPP holds electronic meetings from time to time to consider matters by electronic determination if a proposal has received no objections and has been recommended for approval by Council. The Panel Secretariat has advised that there are on average 6 electronic meetings per year. These meetings necessitate a similar workload for members as ‘traditional’ meetings. As such, it is recommended that the meeting fee of $600 plus GST apply to both ‘traditional’ meetings and electronic meetings.

 

It is estimated that remuneration for electronic meetings will require additional funds of $7,200 per annum based on an average of 6 electronic meetings each year by the SWCPP.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Facilitate economic development.

Additional remuneration is estimated at approx. $7,200 per annum.

Environment

Enhance the environmental performance of buildings and homes.


Social

Regulate for a mix of housing types that responds to different population groups such as young families and older people.


Civic Leadership

Act as an environmental leader in the community.

Operate a well developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct..

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


149

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 02

Investment Report February 2019

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Seek efficient and innovative methods to manage our resources

File Ref

050721.2019

Report By

John Singh - Revenue Accountant

Approved By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report details Council’s investment portfolio.

 

At 28 February 2019, Council held investments with a market value of $286 million.

 

The portfolio yield to the end of February 2019 is 85 basis points above the AusBond Bank Bill index.

 

 

AusBond Bank Bill Index (BBI)

Benchmark

1.95%

Portfolio yield

2.80%

Performance above benchmarks

0.85%

 

Return on investment for February 2019 was $1.4 million higher than budget, however, the favorable variance is expected to be around $700,000 at 30 June 2019.

 

Council’s investments and reporting obligations fully comply with the requirements of section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993 and clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation.

 

Council’s portfolio also fully complies with limits set out in its investment policy. NSW TCorp however has recommended that Council progressively reduce its exposure to lower-rated financial institutions to below 25% of its investment portfolio by 2021.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

 

 

REPORT

 

Clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the Responsible Accounting Officer must provide Council with a written report setting out details of all money that Council has invested under section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Council’s Portfolio

At 28 February 2019, Council held investments with a market value of $286 million. Council’s investment register detailing all its investments is provided as an attachment to this report. In summary, Council’s portfolio consisted of investments in:

The ratio of market value compared to face value of various debt securities is shown in the table below.

Asset Class

Feb-19

Jun-18

Senior Debts (FRN's ,TCD's & FRB)*

100.28%

100.22%

MBS (Reverse Mortgage Backed Securities)

59.59%

59.26%

T-Corp Unit Trusts

102.86%

101.26%

 

*Definition of terms

·      Transferrable Certificate of Deposit (TCD) - security issued with the same characteristics as a Term Deposit however it can be sold back (transferred) in to the market prior to maturity. A floating TCD pays a coupon linked to a variable benchmark (90 days BBSW).

·      Fixed Rate Bond (FRB) – returns Fixed Coupon (interest) Rate and is tradeable before maturity.

 

Council is fully compliant with the requirements of the Ministerial Investment Order including the grandfathering provisions. The grandfathering provision states that Council continues to hold to maturity, redeem or sell investments that comply with previous Ministerial Investment Orders. Any new investments must comply with the most recent Order. Council continues to closely monitor the investments in its portfolio to ensure continued compliance and minimal exposure to risk.

NSW TCorp has recommended that Council progressively reduce its exposure to lower rated financial institutions to below 25% by 2021. Council staff are working with investment advisors to meet this requirement.

 

Portfolio Maturity Profile

The table below shows the percentage of funds invested at different durations to maturity.

 

Market Value by Issuer and Institution Policy limit as per Investment Policy

 

Overall Portfolio Credit Framework compliance to Investment Policy

 

 

 

 

Portfolio performance against relevant market benchmark.

 

Council’s Investment Policy prescribes AusBond Bank Bill Index (ABBI) as a benchmark to measure return on cash and fixed interest securities. The ABBI represents average daily yield of a parcel of bank bills. Historically there has been a positive correlation between changes in the cash rate and the resulting impact on the ABBI benchmark.

 

The portfolio yield to 28 February 2019 exceeded the AusBond Bank Bill index by 85 basis points (2.80% against 1.95 %).

 

Council continues to achieve a solid outcome despite ongoing margin contraction and significantly lower market term deposit yields. Comparative yields for the previous months are charted below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Performance of Portfolio Returns against Budget

 

Council’s investment income for February 2019 exceeded budget by $1.4 million mainly due to higher actual monthly average portfolio holdings compared to budgeted monthly average portfolio holdings for the period. This significantly favorable budget variance is expected to moderate in later months leading to end of financial year as expenditure on capital works ramps up. Based on current projections, investment income is expected to be $700,000 higher than budget at year end.

 

 

Investment Portfolio at a Glance

 

 

Portfolio Performance

 

 

MCWB01114_0000[1]

 

The portfolio yield to 28 February 2019 exceeded the AusBond Bank Bill index by 85 basis points (2.80% against 1.95%).

Annual Income vs. Budget

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Council’s investment interest income exceeded budget by $1.4 million as at 28 February 2019 mainly due to higher actual monthly average portfolio holdings compared to budgeted monthly average portfolio holdings.

 

Investment Policy Compliance

Legislative Requirements

 

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant.

Portfolio Credit Rating Limit

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant.

Institutional Exposure Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Overall Portfolio Credit Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant.

Term to Maturity Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant.

 

 

Economic Outlook – Reserve Bank of Australia

The Reserve Bank has left the official cash rate on hold at 1.5 per cent in its 5 March 2019 meeting. The current 1.5 per cent cash rate is at a historically low level and impacts returns on investment.

 

Certificate of Responsible Accounting Officer

The Chief Financial Officer, as Responsible Accounting Officer, certifies that the investments listed in the attached report have been made in accordance with section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 and Councils Investment Policy at the time of their placement. The previous investments are covered by the ‘grandfathering’ clauses of the current investment guidelines issued by the Minister for Local Government.

 

Independent verification by Head of Audit, Risk and Improvement (HARI)

Council requested an on-going independent review of its investment portfolio by Audit Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC) or its representative under delegated authority. The ARIC has agreed for its Chairperson to provide a certificate on a quarterly basis – the next certificate will be presented to Council on 29 May 2019.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Council’s investment interest income exceeded budget by $1.4 million as at 28 February 2019 mainly due to higher actual monthly average portfolio holdings compared to budgeted monthly average portfolio holdings.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Council is fully compliant with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1993 – Investment Order (authorized investments) and with reporting requirements under Clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Investment Portfolio - February 2019  


151

CORP 02

Investment Report February 2019

Attachment 1

Investment Portfolio - February 2019

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


153

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 03

Provision of Public Parking to City Centre South

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Implement access and equity for all members of the community

File Ref

054834.2019

Report By

Rithy Poch - Senior Project Manager

Approved By

Chris White - Director City Corporate

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Liverpool City Centre Integrated Transport Strategy aims to address traffic and parking demands in the City Centre over the next 20 years. A 2017 car parking study indicated that existing parking demand is extremely high and recommended that additional commuter parking could be provided in peripheral car parks such as the Collimore car park to minimise traffic impact. A rezoning is required to allow a multi-deck car park at Collimore Park and Council has only collected 28% of the funds required from the City Centre development contribution scheme to fund the multi-storey car park.

 

During this period of planning and design investigation for a future multi-storey carpark, there is an opportunity to cost-effectively provide, for the short to medium-term, an additional 357 additional car spaces to support the southern end of the City Centre through two key sites at Woodward Park and 68 Speed Street, Liverpool.

 

This report has been prepared to advise Council of the concept design and planning for additional car parks at Woodward Park to date, as well as the constraints and opportunity for 68 Speed Street, Liverpool to be repurposed as a public car park.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1.       Approves the implementation of the additional at-grade car parking proposal at Woodward Park;

2.       Directs the CEO to include sufficient funds to implement the works in the 2019/20 budget;

3.       Approves the repurposing of 68 Speed Street, Liverpool (Lot 231 DP635209) as public car parking; and

4.       Delegates authority to the CEO to negotiate with the interested parties to achieve favourable commercial terms on 68 Speed Street in both financial outcome and public benefit, and advise councillors of progress through the CEO update process.

 

REPORT

 

Background

 

At its Ordinary Meeting on 29 October 2018, Council considered a report on Liverpool Civic Place (LCP) and resolved, among other things, to “direct the CEO to explore an expansion of the project to include an estimated 500 car parking places as part of the Council works, exploring all different car parking options, including car stackers, and bring a revised project budget and funding strategy to Council for consideration by the end of 2018.”

 

Council conducted a preliminary investigation into potential additional car parking options and at the 5 December 2018 Councillor Briefing, identified Woodward Park as a suitable short-term car parking site to be further investigated.

 

The matter was reported back to Council on 12 December 2018, at which time Council resolved to “direct the CEO to explore the possibility of additional public parking spaces at alternative parking sites such as the Whitlam Leisure Centre, and report back to Council by the Ordinary Meeting of Council in March 2019.”

 

The report noted relevantly that:

 

The existing car parks surrounding the Whitlam Centre have approximately 470 spaces and of these, approximately 150 - 200 spaces could be used for City Centre and commuter parking through introducing minimal signage, better wayfinding, improved circulation connection and public notification works. 

 

In addition, another 130 car spaces could be further provided with minor upgrades…. The City Centre is currently serviced by a free shuttle bus service in the morning and afternoon peak periods, with a bus stop on Memorial Avenue. If requested, a detailed report on the parking provision at the Whitlam Leisure Centre may be provided at a future meeting of Council.

 

This report outlines the proposal to provide 357 additional car spaces to support the southern end of the City Centre through two key sites at Woodward Park and 68 Speed Street, Liverpool.

 

 

Car parking provisions for commuters in the City Centre

 

In 2017, Council engaged a consultant to carry out a parking study as part of the Liverpool City Centre Integrated Transport Strategy to address traffic and parking demands in the City Centre over the next 20 years. 

 

The study identified that approximately 86% of on-street parking spaces and 93% of all Council owned car parks were occupied at 12 noon on a typical weekday. This indicates that existing parking demand is extremely high, exceeding the typical theoretical capacity of 85% for on-street parking where drivers are unable to easily identify remaining vacant spaces.

 

The study recommended that additional commuter parking could be provided in peripheral car parks such as the Collimore car park to minimise traffic impact. At its meeting on 13 December 2017, Council resolved to allocate funding for the design investigation of a multi-deck car park at the existing Collimore car park.

 

Since then, Council has carried out feasibility investigations including land use, zoning, land ownership, traffic impact, access arrangement, and funding strategy. The investigation has identified that to accommodate a multi-deck car park, a rezoning is required.

 

A recent parking survey result shows that the Collimore car park and on-street parking along the surrounding local streets were fully occupied between 10am and 4pm.

 

Council has been collecting developer contributions for additional parking provision in the City Centre. The initial cost estimate for a multi-deck car park with provision for the additional 600 spaces was $24M. To date, Council has collected only $6.6M in funds under the development contribution scheme, which is insufficient to commence the project. 

 

To cater for the short-term increase in car parking demands for commuters in the City Centre, a cost-effective solution involving a new car park, reconfiguration, pavement rehabilitation, additional signage, line markings of selected spaces at the Whitlam Leisure Centre, as well as the repurposing of 68 Speed Street as a public car park, has been identified to potentially provide an additional 357 car parking spaces.

 

In addition to the short-term arrangement, Council will engage a consultant to update the existing City Centre car parking strategy with an implementation plan on the management of car parking demands over the next 10 years. 

 

 

Parking survey at Whitlam Leisure Centre

 

Council conducted traffic surveys for both Collimore and Woodward Park on Thursday 7 March 2019 to determine usage patterns, parking duration and occupancy rate over a typical working day. The results of Woodward Park survey indicate that:

 

·   Approximately 14%- 52% of the existing car parks were occupied between 6am and 9pm.

·   The peak hour demand occurred between 10am and 11am (53% rate of occupancy) and between 4pm and 6pm (44% rate of occupancy).

·   The average duration of stay is 2 hours and 37 minutes.

·   Approximately 239 cars parked for more than 5 hours, which are likely to be commuter or long-term parking.

 

The survey results indicate that there are sufficient vacant spaces (approximately up to 267) within the Whitlam Leisure Centre car parks to accommodate additional parking demand. The conversion of a small proportion of appropriately located vacant spaces as commuter parking will not negatively affect car parking provision for Whitlam Leisure Centre’s facility or sporting users.

 

Council operates a shuttle bus service between the Collimore car park and the City Centre with a stop at the Whitlam Leisure Centre. This service will continue to provide convenient shuttle bus services to commuters who park at the Whitlam Leisure Centre.

 

The illegal parking on community land between Memorial Avenue and the Brass and Pipe Band Hall area, as well as the full utilisation of the car park in the Canterbury Leagues Club owned land, is a strong show of public demand for commuter parking. Provision of additional all-day public car parking will provide more parking options for residents, employees and visitors to the Liverpool City Centre.

 

The creation of additional short-term car parking around the Whitlam Leisure Centre is in keeping with the natural staging of planned upgrades, which will be explored through the upcoming Masterplan works. The short-term positioning of the car park assumes that Council’s multi-purpose hall and aquatic facility will remain unless it could be replaced with a new facility at a different location.

 


 

Proposal for additional car parking at Woodward Park

 

Figure 1 - Indicates the proposed additional car parking zones

 

The key plans for the creation of additional short-term at-grade public parking includes the:

 

·   Provision of 120 additional car parking spaces along Memorial Avenue (Zones 2 & 3) where demand for parking is greatest due to the close proximity of Liverpool train station, T-way and the city centre. This proposal will formalise and legalise the current use of the car spaces. It will also allow an extra access and entry to the Whitlam Leisure Centre by re-connecting an isolated roadway off Memorial Avenue into the Whitlam Leisure Centre’s road network. Illegal truck parking, which once existed at the eastern side of the Brickmakers Creek, will also be removed to protect the adjoining creek.

 

The spaces around the Meals-On-Wheels building will be redesigned to improve circulation and traffic movement. The design will improve both surface condition and drainage by ensuring surface run-off pollution is directed to a bioswale filter before discharging into the creek. The proposal can also provide dedicated parking spaces for Meals-On-Wheels in addition to the existing eight (8) spaces that they currently possess.

 

·  Provision of an additional 88 car spaces by converting the former tennis courts into a formal car park (Zone 1) and making an appropriate connection to the roundabout and the parking areas to the south of the Whitlam Leisure Centre. This will improve circulation by allowing commuters to circulate, with shorter travel distances, to car spaces which are hardly used due to poor wayfinding or visibility.

 

·  Provision of 49 additional all-day parking spaces to the southern car park of the Whitlam Leisure Centre. Feedback from Council’s third-party operator identified that the north-western fan-shaped car park accounts for 80 percent of Whitlam facility users’ demand with the southern car park only attracting the remaining 20 percent. The southern car park is more popular for Whitlam staff members and patrons with disabilities due to its level access and ease of entry to the rear of the facility. To avoid conflict with netball users the number of all-day parking will be reduced to only areas at the edges of the car park and where separate parking signs can be easily installed.

 

The proposal can be summarised in the following table:

 

Stage 1

Location

Additional spaces

Scope

Zone 1

          88

Conversion into car park, new road links

Zone 4

49 (existing)

Existing car park, new sign posts

 

Stage 2

Zone 2

          89

New car park

Zone 3

          31 (6 existing)

Reconfigured car park

 

Cost estimates for each zone and the financial implications are provided in Confidential Attachment ‘A’ to this report.  This attachment is considered commercial-in-confidence, as revealing its content may impact Council’s capacity to negotiate with contractors if the proposed works are approved.

 

The proposed new car park adjacent to Memorial Avenue (Zone 2) can be constructed without development consent as it is on a public reserve vested in the Council. The site is considered low risk in potential contamination and can be developed with minimal impact to the existing vegetation. Despite changes to recent legislation which removes the need for Crown consent, Council will continue to liaise with and inform Crown Land of the proposal.

 

It is proposed to tender the packages separately to enable stage 1, with 137 spaces, to be delivered initially within 4-8 months, utilising savings from the 2018/19 financial year capital works budget. The total number of additional car parks available for public use following completion of both stages are 257 spaces and is anticipated to be completed within 8-12 months.  These time estimates rely on a smooth process through the Crown lands approvals process.  Staff are optimistic that this is possible, but experience suggests this is not guaranteed.

 

The Liverpool City Centre Contributions Plan collects contributions for the provision of parking in two nonspecific locations just outside of the City Centre boundary. The Contributions Plan identifies new parking facilities and as the Zone 2 portion of the proposed works is a new car park that would service the needs identified in the Contributions Plan, it is appropriate that the new Zone 2 car park be funded from developer contributions collected under this Contributions Plan.

 

Parts of the road around the Whitlam Leisure Centre will be scheduled for surface improvements by Council to coincide with its proposed increased use. The estimated cost for the surface improvement works is in the order of $90,000 and, subject to weather and other unforeseen events, should be capable of completion within a few weeks.

 

Council’s Communication team will create new signs for the site and work on a strategy to inform commuters and residents near Woodward Park of the additional parking spaces. This may include the use of social media and Council’s website.

 

 

Proposal for additional car parking at 68 Speed Street

Figure 2 - Indicates the proposed additional car parking

 

68 Speed Street (Lot 231 DP635209) Liverpool is a 3,300 square metre Council-owned property at the southern end of the Liverpool City Centre. The site exists as an island surrounded by Mill Road, Speed Street and Shepherd Street with its eastern boundary bounded by the railway corridor. The facility was known as the Liverpool District Child and Parent Stress Centre and although not far from the City Centre, it is in an isolated position that is not easily accessible. The 234 square metre building on the Northern part of the site was previously leased to Share Care but has been vacant since early February 2019. The facility is in moderate condition and is earmarked to be repurposed within three (3) years in accordance with the adopted Community Facilities Strategic Plan.

 

Council has investigated the potential use of the site for public car parking. A future car park has the potential to provide an additional 100 public parking spaces and to be owned and operated, by Council with time limited parking.

 

The repurposing of the site entirely as a car park will support the Neighbourhood Shops development at the southern end of the City Centre and be fully funded by interested parties keen to support the economic development of the southern area.

 

If supported, the proposal will allow Council to retain the asset for short to medium-term community and economic benefit, until such time as the value of the land enables redevelopment of the site for other community uses to be feasible.

 

Critical Dates / Timeframes

Following Council approval, documentation for the project is proposed to commence in April 2019.  Subject to a smooth Crown lands approvals process and any other relevant approvals, the works are forecast to meet the following key dates:

Woodward Park Car Park

a)       Design and documentation                              Apr - June 2019

b)       Tender and Award                                           June - Sept 2019

c)       Construction works – stage 1                          June - Aug 2019

d)       Construction works – stage 2                          Sept - Dec 2019

e)       Opening Ceremony Options                            Dec 2019 / Feb 2020

 

68  Speed Street Car Park

a)       Commercial Negotiation                                  Apr - May 2019

b)       Council Tender Exemption Report                 June 2019

 

Conclusion

 

Council’s car parking strategy is in progress and is a timely piece of work given the strategic growth of the Liverpool City Centre and its connectivity to major State Government infrastructure projects such as the Western Sydney Airport and the Aerotropolis.

 

The provision of short to medium-term additional public car parking is necessary for the growth and economic development of the Liverpool City Centre, particularly given the recent growth and development to the southern end of the City Centre.

 

The proposal will enhance parking options and convenience for residents, employees and visitors and will promote economic growth, enhance connectivity to other transport options and improve accessibility to the City Centre.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Provide efficient parking for the City Centre.

Deliver a high quality local road system including provision and maintenance of infrastructure and management of traffic issues.

Facilitate economic development.

Facilitate the development of new tourism based on local attractions.

Environment

Promote an integrated and user friendly public transport service.

Support the delivery of a range of transport options.


Social

Support access and services for people with a disability.


Civic Leadership

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         ATTACHMENT A - Provision of Public Parking to City Centre South - Confidential   


163

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

City  Infrastructure and Environment Report

 

INF 01

Conservation of Koala Habitat Corridors

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

051012.2019

Report By

Michael Zengovski - Manager City Environment

Approved By

Raj Autar - Director City Infrastructure and Environment

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council, at its meeting held on 29 October 2018, considered a Notice of Motion regarding the creation and preservation of Koala habitat corridors as a means of stabilising Koala populations across the LGA, and resolved that a preservation corridor be considered as part of Council’s Local Environment Plan (LEP) review.

 

This report provides an update on a range of actions undertaken in response to the above Council resolution.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the report.

 

 

REPORT

 

Background

 

At its meeting held on 29 October 2018, Council resolved that council officers:

 

1.    Write to the Minister for Roads, Maritime and Freight requesting variable message signs (VMS) along Heathcote Road, Moorebank, Australis and Anzac Avenues with wildlife crossing signs;

2.    Consider the following matters in the upcoming LEP review workshop and provide a report back to Council by February 2019 that identifies cost to include and implement:

a)    Consider a preservation corridor route with the suggested setbacks of 425m river and 250m creeks for koala/wildlife traversing through the Liverpool LGA along the Georges river from Campbelltown, connecting to the Holsworthy Army land and any known sub colony areas in the Liverpool LGA;

b)    Investigate the cost of implementing the planting koala Food Trees along the corridor routes;

c)    Investigate the cost of a wildlife fencing plan along Heathcote Road that includes a channelling fence directing wildlife below Deadmans Creek bridge which is recognised as a koala kill hotspot; and

d)    Wildlife crossings across the Georges River and identified road kill hotspots in the Liverpool LGA.

3.    Congratulate all efforts to action the protection of koalas in South West Sydney, which could include the:

a)    Establishment of a 4000 hectare Koala National Park in southwest Sydney; and

b)    Welcome all money to establish better koala care in South West Sydney.

 

Koala Habitat Conservation

A Councillor workshop was held in November 2018 to consider a range of planning matters including a review of Council’s LEP. As part of this review, a Koala habitat corridor was identified linking the Georges River and Harris Creek, through the Holsworthy Defence lands.  The identified corridor will be included in the Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) mapping as an area for further investigation and protection.  It is worth noting that aside from the Holsworthy Army Barracks, there are no other known populations of Koalas in the Liverpool LGA. Further, current ecological data also indicates that there are no areas of Council managed bushland capable of supporting Koalas.

 

In this regard, Council has written to the Ministry of Defence to seek its support in actively participating and engaging with Council in the establishment of a sustainable Koala Management Plan.

 

Any works to protect the identified habitat corridors will also require the provision and maintenance of appropriate planting. Based on advice from the Office of Environment and Heritage, the costs associated with planting food trees are estimated to be between $1,200 to $1,500 per hectare.

 

Safety of Koala populations

In view of Koala deaths from vehicle strikes, Council has been urging the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) to place wildlife crossing signs as well as variable message signs at known koala road kill hotspots. In response, and as part of reconstruction of the section of Heathcote Road between Infantry Parade and The Avenue in Voyager Point, the RMS has made provisions for the construction of six dedicated fauna underpasses to facilitate wildlife connectivity.

 

Further, due to the existence of extensive security fencing along Heathcote Road along identified habitat corridors, the environmental assessments undertaken by RMS concluded that the existing fencing arrangements were considered satisfactory.

 

With regards to improving wildlife connectivity across the Georges River, Council’s investigations found that the only viable crossing points are located within the Defence lands. While these areas are outside Council’s control, Council will continue to urge Ministry of Defence to work with Council in developing a suitable Koala Management Plan, which includes provisions for suitable wildlife crossing.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no financial impacts at this stage.

Environment

Protect, enhance and maintain areas of endangered ecological communities and high quality bushland as part of an attractive mix of land uses.

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Act as an environmental leader in the community.

Actively advocate for federal and state government support, funding and services.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil  


165

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

Committee Reports

 

CTTE 01

Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee held on 5 February 2019

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Develop, and advocate for, plans that support safe and friendly communities

File Ref

038268.2019

Report By

Michael Zengovski - Manager City Environment

Approved By

Raj Autar - Director City Infrastructure and Environment

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report is tabled in order to present the Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee Meeting held on 5 February 2019.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee Meeting held on 5 February 2019.

 

 

REPORT

 

The Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee held on 5 February 2019 are attached for the information of Council.

 

The Minutes identify a number of actions that require Council staff to undertake, none of which will have any financial impact on Council.

    

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

Manage the environmental health of waterways.

Manage air, water, noise and chemical pollution.

Enhance the environmental performance of buildings and homes.

Protect, enhance and maintain areas of endangered ecological communities and high quality bushland as part of an attractive mix of land uses.

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.


Social

Preserve and maintain heritage, both landscape and cultural as urban development takes place.

Support community organisations, groups and volunteers to deliver coordinated services to the community.

Deliver high quality services for children and their families.


Civic Leadership

Act as an environmental leader in the community.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         EAC Minutes - 5 February


167

CTTE 01

Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee held on 5 February 2019

Attachment 1

EAC Minutes - 5 February

 

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173

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

Committee Reports

 

CTTE 02

Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council meeting held 13 February 2019

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Increase community engagement

File Ref

044022.2019

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Tina Sangiuliano - Acting Director City Community and Culture

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report is tabled in order to present the Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council Meeting held on 13 February 2019.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.       Receives and notes the Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council Meeting held on 13 February 2019; and

 

2.       Endorses the appointment of Ms Madison Young as a member of the Liverpool Youth Council for the remainder of the 2018–2020 Liverpool Youth Council term.

 

REPORT

 

The Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council meeting held on 13 February 2019 are attached for the information of Council.

 

The Minutes identify a number of actions that require Council staff to undertake, none of which will have any financial impact on Council.

 

Liverpool Youth Council currently has one vacant position. In accordance with section 9.3.1 of the Liverpool Youth Council Charter, an eligibility list was created to include applicants who had previously submitted an application and attended an interview for the Liverpool Youth Council term 2018-2020.

 

The Youth Council Committee members were provided with four applicants from the eligibility list to select and nominate an eligible candidate for the vacant position.

 

Youth Council Committee members have selected Ms. Madison Young as the preferred candidate for the position. Ms. Madison Young was elected unopposed to be appointed to the Youth Council for the remainder of the 2018-2020 term.

 

    

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Raise awareness in the community about the available services and facilities.

Support community organisations, groups and volunteers to deliver coordinated services to the community.


Civic Leadership

Facilitate the development of community leaders.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council Meeting held on 13 February 2019  


177

CTTE 02

Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council meeting held 13 February 2019

Attachment 1

Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council Meeting held on 13 February 2019

 

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179

Ordinary Meeting 27 March 2019

Committee Reports

 

CTTE 03

Minutes of Aboriginal Consultative Committee held on 7 February  2019

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Encourage community participation in decision-making

File Ref