COUNCIL AGENDA

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

31 July 2019

 

FRANCIS GREENWAY CENTRE

170 GEORGE STREET LIVERPOOL


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You are hereby notified that an Ordinary Council Meeting of Liverpool City Council will be held at the Francis Greenway Centre, 170 George Street, Liverpool on Wednesday, 31 July 2019 commencing at 6.00pm. Doors to the Francis Greenway Centre will open at 5.50pm.

 

Liverpool City Council Meetings are taped for the purposes of minute taking and record keeping.  If you have any enquiries please contact Council and Executive Services on 8711 7584.

 

 

 

 


Kiersten Fishburn

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

 

 


 

 

 


Order of Business

 

                                                                                                              PAGE     TAB

Opening

Acknowledgment of Country and Prayer

National Anthem

Apologies 

Condolences

Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council Meeting held on 26 June 2019.................................................................... 6

Declarations of Interest

Public Forum

Mayoral Report

NIL

Notices of Motion Of Rescission

NOMR 01       Rescission of EGROW 04 - Middleton Grange Town Centre Planning Proposal –       Post exhibition report from the Council Meeting of 12 December 2018

                        (to be provided in Addendum booklet)

City Economy and Growth Report

EGROW 01    Draft Liverpool Pioneers' Memorial Park Conservation Management Plan.. 52......... 1

EGROW 02    Community Participation Plan........................................................................ 56......... 2

EGROW 03    Street Naming Request - Austral.................................................................... 60......... 3

EGROW 04    Planning proposal to rezone land at 240 Governor Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm 70         4

EGROW 05    Results of pilot study for providing on-street parking spaces on narrow streets....... 93 5

Chief Executive Officer Report

CEO 01           Local Government NSW Conference 2019.................................................. 104......... 6

CEO 02           Annual report to Council by the Internal Ombudsman................................. 130......... 7

City Community and Culture Report

COM 01          Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship........................................... 134......... 8

COM 02          Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage 2...................................................... 142......... 9

COM 03          Draft Liverpool Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy................................. 161....... 10

City Corporate Report

CORP 01        Investment Report June 2019...................................................................... 167....... 11

 

City Presentation Report

NIL

City  Infrastructure and Environment Report

INF 01             Update on Governor Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm - Response to NOM05 175    12

INF 02             Speaking 4 the Planet event - 7 June 2019................................................. 179....... 13

Committee Reports

CTTE 01         Minutes of the Liverpool Community Safety and Crime Prevention Advisory Committee Meeting held on 6 June 2019.................................................... 183....... 14

CTTE 02         Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council Meeting held on 5 June 2019........ 190....... 15

CTTE 03         Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee Meeting held on 4 June 2019     197 16

CTTE 04         Minutes of the Liverpool Sports Committee held on 30 May 2019.............. 205....... 17

CTTE 05         Minutes of the Liverpool Access Committee Meeting held on 13 June 2019 212       18

CTTE 06         Minutes of the Strategic Panel - 11 June 2019............................................ 219....... 19

Questions with Notice

QWN 01          Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Buses in New Release Suburbs........ 227....... 20

QWN 02          Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Oversized Load Carrying Vehicles.... 230....... 21

QWN 03          Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Smoking Kiosks.................................. 232....... 22

QWN 04          Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Upkeep of Vacant Lots....................... 233....... 23

QWN 05          Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Community Wealth Building............... 234....... 24

QWN 06          Question with Notice - Clr Ayyad - Middleton Grange Town Centre........... 235....... 25

QWN 07          Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Middleton Grange Town Centre........ 236....... 26

QWN 08          Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Tennis Petition.................................... 237....... 27

QWN 09          Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Visitation Survey................................. 238....... 28

QWN 10          Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Liverpool Collaboration Area.............. 239....... 29  

Presentations by Councillors

Notices of Motion

NOM 01          Commuter Car Parking Crisis....................................................................... 240....... 30

NOM 02          Proactive Building Inspections...................................................................... 242....... 31

NOM 03          Infrastructure Funding Priorities................................................................... 244....... 32

NOM 04          Opportunities for the Repurposing of Council Owned or Controlled Land for Affordable Housing....................................................................................... 246....... 33

NOM 05          A Prominent Permanent Home for the City of Liverpool and District Historical Society.......................................................................................................... 248....... 34  

Council in Closed Session

The following items are listed for consideration by Council in Closed Session with the public excluded, in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 1993 as listed below:

 

CONF 01    Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Occupation Certificates

Reason:     Item CONF 01 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(g) of the Local Government Act because it contains advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

 

CONF 02    Legal Affairs Report

Reason:     Item CONF 02 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(g) of the Local Government Act because it contains advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

 

CONF 03    Mayoral Direction pursuant to Section 226(d) of the Local Government Act 1993

Reason:     Item CONF 03 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(e) of the Local Government Act because it contains information that would, if disclosed, prejudice the maintenance of law.

 

CONF 04    Acquisition of Lot 299 DP 2475 being 50 Sixteenth Avenue, Austral for drainage purposes

Reason:     Item CONF 04 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

CONF 05    Heathcote Road Upgrade LCC Property Adjustments and Public Road Dedication

Reason:     Item CONF 05 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

CONF 06    Legal Matters

Reason:     Item CONF 06 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(g) of the Local Government Act because it contains advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

 

CONF 07    Personnel Matters - Council in Closed Session

Reason:     Item CONF 07 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(a) of the Local Government Act because it contains personal matters concerning particular individuals (other than councillors).  

Close

 


 

 

 

MINUTES OF THE Ordinary Meeting

HELD ON 26 June 2019

 

 

PRESENT:

Mayor Wendy Waller

Councillor Ayyad

Councillor Balloot

Councillor Hadchiti

Councillor Hadid

Councillor Hagarty

Councillor Harle

Councillor Kaliyanda

Councillor Karnib

Councillor Rhodes

Councillor Shelton

Ms Kiersten Fishburn, Chief Executive Officer

Mr Tim Moore, Director City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

Mr Vishwa Nadan, Acting Director City Corporate

Ms Tina Sangiuliano, Acting Director City Community and Culture

Mr Peter Patterson, Director City Presentation

Mr Michael Zengovski, Acting Director City Infrastructure and Environment

Mr John Milicic, Manager, Property

Mr Michael Knight, Acting General Counsel Manager Governance Legal

Mr David Smith, Manager Planning & Transport Strategy

Mr Charles Wiafe, Service Manager Traffic and Transport

Mr Andrew Stevenson, Manager Communications

Mr George Georgakis, Manager Council and Executive Services

Ms Susan Ranieri, Coordinator Council and Executive Services (minutes)

 

The meeting commenced at 6.00pm.

 

 

 

 

 

STATEMENT REGARDING                    The Mayor reminded everyone that in

WEBCASTING OF MEETING                 accordance with Council’s Code of Meeting                                                                        Practice (other than the Public Forum Section),                                                                            the meeting is being livestreamed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF COUNTRY, The prayer of the Council was read by Reverend

PRAYER OF COUNCIL AND                  Manoj Chacko from Liverpool South Anglican

AFFIRMATION TO BE READ BY           Church.

 

NATIONAL ANTHEM                                       The National Anthem performed and recorded by Rebekah Ferro was played at the meeting.

APOLOGIES                                            Nil.

CONDOLENCES                                     Nil.

Confirmation of Minutes

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda 

 

That the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting held on 29 May 2019 be confirmed as a true record of that meeting.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED

 

Declarations of Interest 

 

Clr Rhodes declared a pecuniary interest in the following item: 

 

Item COM 01:       Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship.

 

Reason:                Thomas Hassall Anglican College advertises in the Your Liverpool    publication that Clr Rhodes produces.

 

Clr Rhodes left the Chambers for the duration of this item.

 

 

Clr Kaliyanda declared a non-pecuniary, less than significant interest in the following item: 

 

Item COM 01:       Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship.

 

Reason:                Clr Kaliyanda is employed at an alternative headspace site that is               managed by a different lead agency.

 

Clr Kaliyanda remained in the Chambers for the duration of this item.  

 

Clr Harle declared a non-pecuniary, less  than significant interest in the following item:   

 

Item EGROW 04: Update on planning proposal to rezone land at 240 Governor Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm.

 

Reason:                Clr Harle has family members that live in the area.

 

Clr Harle remained in the Chambers for the duration of this item. 

 

 

Clr Ayyad declared a non-pecuniary, less than significant interest in the following item: 

 

Item COM 01:       Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship.

 

Reason:                Clr Ayyad’s children attend Thomas Hassall Anglican College.

 

Clr Ayyad remained in the Chambers for the duration of this item. 

 

 

Clr Hadid declared a non-pecuniary, but significant interest in the following item:

 

Item EGROW 02:  Proposed amendment to Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 - Rezoning land subject to Basin 14 and Bernera Road, Edmondson Park.

Reason:                Clr Hadid is the President of the Australian Islamic House, the landowner   of 2094 Camden Valley Way, Edmondson Park.

 

Clr Hadid left the Chambers for the duration of this item. 

 

 

Public Forum

Presentation – items not on agenda    

Nil.

Representation – items on agenda

1.       Mr Gary Portelli addressed Council on the following item:

          EGROW 04 – Update on planning proposal to rezone land at 240 Governor           Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm.


 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Harle

That a three minute extension of time be given to the speaker.

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

MAYORAL MINUTES

Nil.


 

 

City Economy and Growth Report

ITEM NO:       EGROW 01

FILE NO:        127793.2019

SUBJECT:     Bathurst Street Ring Road

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Notes the update on the design investigations for the Bathurst Street Extension project;

 

2.    Notes that a road layout which would operate with acceptable traffic conditions in the long term, may require partial rather than full road closure of the section of Pirie Street, between Terminus Street and Macquarie Street; and

 

3.    Receive an update report on the design investigations, following the RMS endorsement of a concept design for the project.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda 

 

That Council:

 

1.    Notes the update on the design investigations for the Bathurst Street Extension project;

 

2.    Notes that a road layout which would operate with acceptable traffic conditions in the long term, may require partial rather than full road closure of the section of Pirie Street, between Terminus Street and Macquarie Street; and

 

3.    Proceeds with plans for a multi-storey carpark at the site. Council to receive a report on the matter by November 2019.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


11

During discussion on this item Clr Hadid left the Chambers at 6.29pm.

ITEM NO:       EGROW 02

FILE NO:        135577.2019

SUBJECT:     Proposed amendment to Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 - Rezoning land subject to Basin 14 and Bernera Road, Edmondson Park

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

  1. Notes the advice of the Liverpool Local Planning Panel;

 

  1. Supports in principle the planning proposal to amend the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 to rezone land and amend development standards for certain land subject to proposed Basin 14 and Bernera Road, Edmondson Park;

 

  1. Supports in principle the amendments to the Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008;

 

  1. Delegates to the CEO to make any typographical or other editing amendments to the planning proposal and Development Control Plan if required;

 

  1. Forwards the planning proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment pursuant to Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, seeking a Gateway determination;

 

  1. Subject to Gateway determination, undertake public exhibition and community consultation for both the planning proposal and Development Control Plan in accordance with the conditions of the Gateway determination; and

 

  1. Receive a further report on the outcomes of public exhibition and community consultation.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That Council:

 

  1. Notes the advice of the Liverpool Local Planning Panel;

 

 

 

  1. Supports in principle the planning proposal to amend the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 to rezone land and amend development standards for certain land subject to proposed Basin 14 and Bernera Road, Edmondson Park;

 

  1. Supports in principle the amendments to the Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008, including a review of whether the left hand deceleration from Camden Valley Way into Bernera Road can be lengthened;

 

4.    Notes the need to undertake a revised stormwater drainage plan to minimise the harmful and negative effects of open drains and channel systems;

 

  1. Delegates to the CEO to make any typographical or other editing amendments to the planning proposal and Development Control Plan if required;

 

  1. Forwards the planning proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment pursuant to Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, seeking a Gateway determination;

 

  1. Subject to Gateway determination, undertake public exhibition and community consultation for both the planning proposal and Development Control Plan in accordance with the conditions of the Gateway determination; and

 

  1. Receive a further report on the outcomes of public exhibition and community consultation.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 

Note: Clr Hadid was not in the Chambers when this item was voted on.


13

Clr Hadid returned to the Chambers at 6.31pm.

ITEM NO:       EGROW 03

FILE NO:        136186.2019

SUBJECT:     Proposed amendment to Schedule 1 Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 - additional permitted use for 'Car Parks' at Collimore Park, Liverpool

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

  1. Notes the advice of the Liverpool Local Planning Panel;

 

  1. Supports in principle the planning proposal to amend Schedule 1 of the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 to permit car parks as a land use permitted with consent at Collimore Park;

 

  1. Delegates to the CEO to make any typographical or other editing amendments to the planning proposal if required;

 

  1. Forwards the planning proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment pursuant to Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, seeking a Gateway determination;

 

  1. Subject to Gateway determination, undertakes public exhibition and community consultation in accordance with the conditions of the Gateway determination; and

 

  1. Receives a further report on the outcomes of public exhibition and community consultation.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes                        Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That Council:

 

  1. Notes the advice of the Liverpool Local Planning Panel;

 

  1. Supports in principle the planning proposal to amend Schedule 1 of the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 to permit car parks as a land use permitted with consent at Collimore Park;

 

  1. Delegates to the CEO to make any typographical or other editing amendments to the planning proposal if required;

 

  1. Forwards the planning proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment pursuant to Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, seeking a Gateway determination;

 

  1. Subject to Gateway determination, and Council investigation of opportunities to utilise demountable stacked multi-storey parking construction further undertakes public exhibition and community consultation in accordance with the conditions of the Gateway determination; and

 

  1. Receives a further report on the outcomes of public exhibition and community consultation.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 


15

ITEM NO:       EGROW 04

FILE NO:        141244.2019

SUBJECT:     Update on planning proposal to rezone land at 240 Governor Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Notes the current status of the planning proposal seeking an amendment to the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan at 240 Governor Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm; and

 

2.   Notes the current status of design work for the proposed bypass road and the update with respect to all other items of the 29 May 19 Council resolution in relation to NOM 05 - Warwick Farm.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 

 

 


17

 

Chief Executive Officer Report

ITEM NO:       CEO 01

FILE NO:        077259.2019

SUBJECT:     Ward Boundaries

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

  1. Notes the proposed alterations to the draft ward boundary plan pursuant to the provisions of s211 of the Local Government Act 1993;

 

  1. Forward the draft ward boundary plan to the Electoral Commissioner and Australian Statistician for comment;

 

  1. Exhibit the proposed draft ward boundary plans subject to the concurrence of the Electoral Commission for a period of 42 days inviting public submissions; and

 

  1. Receive a further report at the completion of the advertising period in order to consider all submissions received and make a final determination.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council:

 

  1. Notes the proposed alterations to the draft ward boundary plan pursuant to the provisions of s211 of the Local Government Act 1993;

 

  1. Forward the draft ward boundary plan (all five options in the report) to the Electoral Commissioner and Australian Statistician for comment;

 

  1. Exhibit the proposed draft ward boundary plans subject to the concurrence of the Electoral Commission for a period of 42 days inviting public submissions; and

 

  1. Receive a further report at the completion of the advertising period in order to consider all submissions received and make a final determination.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


17

ITEM NO:       CEO 02

FILE NO:        112986.2019

SUBJECT:     Western Parkland City Liveability Fund: Round Two

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council endorse the River Connections – Lighthorse Park Precinct Improvement Program as the recommended project for submission under the second round of applications under the Western Parkland City Liveability Fund.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That Council:

 

  1. Endorse in principle the River Connections – Lighthorse Park Precinct Improvement Program as the recommended project for submission under the second round of applications under the Western Parkland City Liveability Fund; and

 

2.    Note the design suggestions outlined at the Strategic Planning meeting on Thursday 20 May are to be considered into the design and submission.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


19

ITEM NO:       CEO 03

FILE NO:        142042.2019

SUBJECT:     Revised 2019/20 Operating & Capital Budget

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receive and note this report.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council receive and note this report subject to the following addition to point (g) of the Proposed Capital Works Program identified in the report:

 

·    Identification of roundabouts and islands that could have suitable plants on them.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 


21

MOTION TO BRING ITEM FORWARD

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Mayor Waller

 

That item EGROW 05 Draft Local Strategic Planning Statement be brought forward and dealt with now.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

ITEM NO:       EGROW 05

FILE NO:        135932.2019

SUBJECT:     Draft Local Strategic Planning Statement

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

  1. Endorses the draft Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) and places it on public exhibition for a period of 6 weeks (July 2019 to early August 2019); and

 

  1. Receives a further report following the public exhibition period detailing submissions received and any amendments proposed.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Hadid 

 

That Council:

 

  1. Endorses the draft Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) with the following changes and places it on public exhibition for a period of 6 weeks (July 2019 to early August 2019):

 

·      A direct mail-out notification be sent to all residents of the LGA; 

 

·      The Statement of Commitment be amended with a Statement that includes the diversity of this area; and

 

·      The black outline in the Warwick Farm precinct be changed to red.

 

  1. Receives a further report following the public exhibition period detailing submissions received and any amendments proposed.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Clrs Rhodes and Hadchiti left the Chambers at 7.05pm.

Clr Hadchiti returned to the Chambers at 7.07pm.

 

City Community and Culture Report

ITEM NO:       COM 01

FILE NO:        136417.2019

SUBJECT:     Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council endorses the funding recommendation of $28,900 (GST exclusive) under the Corporate Sponsorship Program for the following projects:

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Liverpool Community Kitchen Hub

Liverpool Community Kitchen and Hub

$10,000

NSW Barefoot Waterski Club

2020 Barefoot Waterski World Championship

$10,000

Headspace Liverpool

Share the Journey Living Library Event

$4,900

Thomas Hassall Anglican College

South West Festival

$4,000

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Karnib

That:

  1. Council endorses the funding recommendation of $28,900 (GST exclusive) under the Corporate Sponsorship Program for the following projects:

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Liverpool Community Kitchen Hub

Liverpool Community Kitchen and Hub

$10,000

NSW Barefoot Waterski Club

2020 Barefoot Waterski World Championship

$10,000

Headspace Liverpool

Share the Journey Living Library Event

$4,900

Thomas Hassall Anglican College

South West Festival

$4,000

 

 

 

2.    Council’s Grants team contact the Alliance for Gambling Reform to see if there are suitable grants available for their KaChing Community Language Dubbing Project. 

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


23

Clr Rhodes returned to the Chambers at 7.11pm.

ITEM NO:       COM 02

FILE NO:        136912.2019

SUBJECT:     Future Demands for Early Childhood Services in Liverpool

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the Future Demands for Early Childhood Services in Liverpool Report.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Hadid 

 

That Council receives and notes the Future Demands for Early Childhood Services in Liverpool Report and continues to forward plan in accordance with the comments in this business item.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


23

 

City Corporate Report

ITEM NO:       CORP 01

FILE NO:        136112.2019

SUBJECT:     Investment Report May 2019

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


25

ITEM NO:       CORP 02

FILE NO:        142382.2019

SUBJECT:     Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Annual Report and Determination under sections 239 and 241 of the Local Government Act 1993

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council pursuant to Section 248 and 249 of the Act, resolves to fix the fees payable to the Mayor and Councillors for the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020 to an amount equal to the maximum allowable under the determination of the Local Government Remuneration Tribunal, dated 15 April 2019.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Hadchiti

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Mayor Waller called a recess of Council at 7.13pm.

 

Mayor Waller reopened Council at 7.19pm with all Councillors present except Clrs Hadchiti, Hagarty, Kaliyanda and Karnib.

 

Clr Hagarty returned to the Chambers at 7.20pm.

Clr Karnib returned to the Chambers at 7.21pm.

Clrs Kaliyanda and Hadchiti returned to the Chambers at 7.22pm.

 

 


25

 

City Infrastructure and Environment Report

ITEM NO:       INF 01

FILE NO:        099749.2019

SUBJECT:     Activating the Georges River

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That Council receives and notes this report also noting that further actions contributed at the Strategic Planning Meeting on Thursday 20th May meeting are to be considered in the activation of the Georges River.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


27

 

Committee Reports

ITEM NO:       CTTE 01

FILE NO:        099878.2019

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Liverpool Access Committee meeting held on 18 April 2019

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Liverpool Access Committee meeting held on 18 April 2019.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Hagarty 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


29

ITEM NO:       CTTE 02

FILE NO:        121909.2019

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee Meeting

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts the following recommendations of the Committee:

 

Item 1      Nuwarra Road and Marshall Avenue intersection, Moorebank – proposed roundabout.

·      Council requests the RMS to:

 

a)   Consider modification to the existing traffic signals at the intersection of Nuwarra Road and Brickmakers Drive to provide gaps in southbound traffic along Nuwarra Road; and

 

b)   Approve the installation of ‘Keep Clear’ pavement marking to supplement the existing ‘Do Not Queue across Intersection’ signposting at the Nuwarra Road and Marshall Avenue intersection.

·      Council investigates:

 

a)   Alternate intersection treatment subject to the RMS position on the abovementioned changes.

 

b)   Imposition of a 5 tonne load limit along the section of Nuwarra Road between Heathcote Road and Newbridge Road.

 

Item 2      Nuwarra Road, Moorebank – Proposed signs and line marking scheme

·      Installation of the line marking scheme as presented in Attachment 2.1 of the minutes to demarcate the traffic and parking lanes along the section of Nuwarra Road between Newbridge Road and Heathcote Road, Moorebank.

 

Item 3      The Boulevard, Holsworthy – proposed pedestrian refuge

·      Installation of a pedestrian refuge across The Boulevarde, Holsworthy east of Wenton Road, as shown in Attachment 3.1 of the minutes.

 

Item 4      Sandringham Drive and Edinburgh Circuit intersection, Cecil Hills – proposed intersection treatment

·      Replacement of the existing ‘Give Way’ control with ‘Stop’ control and reconfiguration of the median island to accommodate a seagull island arrangement as shown in Attachment 4.1 of the minutes.

 

Item 5      Bigge Street, Liverpool - request for a pedestrian crossing facility

·      Council notes that current traffic and pedestrian volumes do not meet the RMS warrant for a marked pedestrian crossing across the section of Bigge Street between Elizabeth Street and Campbell Street.

 

·      Review the existing parking restrictions along the section of Bigge Street between Elizabeth Street and Campbell Street, in consultation with the local bus companies and the school.

 

Item 6      Regentville Drive, Elizabeth Hills – proposed pedestrian refuge

 

·      Installation of a pedestrian refuge on Regentville Drive, Elizabeth Hills, as shown in Attachment 6.1 of the minutes.

 

Item 7      Falcon Circuit, Green Valley - proposed pedestrian refuge

·      Installation of a pedestrian refuge across the section of Falcon Circuit, between Ospray Avenue and Winnal Reserve, as shown in Attachment 7.1 of the minutes.

 

Item 8      Graham Avenue and McKell Avenue intersection, Casula – proposed line marking scheme

·      Installation of ‘BB’ line along McKell Avenue, ‘C1’ line and ‘C3’ No Stopping lines at the intersection of Graham Avenue and McKell Ave, as shown in Attachment 8.1 of the minutes.

 

Item 9      Viscount Place, Warwick farm – proposed traffic facilities

·      Council approves the proposed traffic facilities including a roundabout, a marked pedestrian crossing and associated signs and line marking, as shown in Attachment 9.1 of the minutes.

 

Item 10    Items Approved Under Delegated Authority

·       Council notes the traffic facilities approved by the Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee Delegated Authority by the RMS and Police representatives over the last two month period, between 5 March and 8 May 2019. 

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Hagarty 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


31

ITEM NO:       CTTE 03

FILE NO:        135341.2019

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee Meeting held on 2 April 2019

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee Meeting held on 2 April 2019.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Hagarty 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


31

ITEM NO:       CTTE 04

FILE NO:        136241.2019

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee meeting held on Monday 3 June 2019

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee meeting held on 3 June 2019.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Hagarty 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


33

ITEM NO:       CTTE 05

FILE NO:        136518.2019

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee Meeting held on 3 May 2019

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee Meeting held on 3 May 2019.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Hagarty 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


33

ITEM NO:       CTTE 06

FILE NO:        137475.2019

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council Committee Meeting held on 8 May 2019

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council Meeting held on 8 May 2019.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Hagarty 

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


35

Questions with Notice

ITEM NO:       QWN 01

FILE NO:        138839.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Mosquitoes

 

Please address the following:

 

1.         What progress has been made in relation to the Mosquito issue?

 

On Tuesday 4 June 2019, City Presentation directorate initiated a meeting with various stakeholders including adjoining Councils, NSW Health, Sydney Water, Sydney Olympic Park and Georges River Keeper to discuss current community concerns about the increase in the mosquito population and the request for councils to take action and develop a management plan. NSW Health expert on Entomology, Dr. Cameron Webb presented on “Mosquitoes of Pest and Public Health concern in the Georges River region” and “Managing Mosquitoes in Georges River Liverpool”.

 

Dr. Webb provided much insight on various mosquito species, the difference between nuisance mosquitoes and disease borne mosquitoes, options for mosquito management and the benefits of public education and awareness. Options discussed for mosquito management included spray application of a bacterial larvicide Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies israelensis (Bti). Bti is a natural occurring bacterium found in soils and has been approved by the EPA for use in residential, commercial and agricultural settings primarily for control of mosquito larvae. Bti is a selective larvicide that targets saltwater species of mosquitoes and is currently considered safe for humans, pets and other fauna in the environment.

 

Following the presentation Director City Presentation, Peter Patterson stated that this was an opportunity for a collaborative discussion on formulating a unified approach to mosquito management. The option was put to all stakeholders to participate in a working group, sharing resources, costs and developing a single management plan for all councils to buy into.

 

The outcome from the initial meeting was all that all stakeholders agreed to engage Dr. Cameron Webb to undertake a preliminary program of mapping and surveillance of key hot spots along the Georges River. From these findings, Dr. Webb will produce a draft mosquito management plan to the working group. A Memorandum of Understanding will be drafted by the Council for all stakeholders to participate as a working group.

 

In the interim, Council staff will be working on the development of a fact sheet about mosquito management and personal protection for the community, including provisions for signage to be displayed in mosquito active areas. Furthermore, Council will work on a mapping plan to identify known mosquito breeding areas within the LGA and research engagement considerations for the potential seasonal spraying application of Bti.

 

At this time, we are working towards a regional management approach, however in the event that other councils or key stakeholder land owners do not wish to participate, Liverpool will continue working towards preparation of a standalone approach to mosquito management within our LGA. Dr Webb is expected to have the draft regional and standalone management plans completed by end of August 2019.

 

 


37

During discussion on QWN 02, Mayor Waller advised that Council would later move into Closed Session to deal with Items QWN 02, QWN 05 and CONF 02 pursuant to the provisions of S10(A)(2(g) of the Local Government Act because the items contain advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

ITEM NO:       QWN 02

FILE NO:        138841.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Voluntary Planning Agreements (VPA's)

This item was dealt with later in the meeting in closed session.

ITEM NO:       QWN 03

FILE NO:        142087.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Buses in New Release Suburbs

Liverpool's new release areas are poorly serviced by public transport. Suburbs such as Middleton Grange, Elizabeth Hills and Len Waters Estate are barely serviced by single, infrequent routes with limited stops.

 

The on-demand bus service in Edmondson Park also has issues. According to figures from Transport for NSW, the average cost per passenger of operating on-demand services across all the trial areas is $34.56 per trip. The near by and now abandoned Wetherill Park trial cost taxpayers $940 per passenger. The buses must be booked online, by phone or via an app. This disadvantages commuters who have digital literacy and access issues as well as people from CALD backgrounds. 

 

Better public transport, including bus services, means more cars off the road, less pressure on commuter car parking and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Research has also shown that riding a bus is 90 times safer than car travel.

 

With more housing developments coming in suburbs such as Austral, Liverpool needs better existing and future public transport including buses.

 

Please address the following:

1.    Are additional, more frequent bus services planned for Liverpool? Specifically new release suburbs and estates including Parkbridge Estate?

2.    Are additional on-demand bus services planned for Liverpool?

3.    What is the cost per passenger of the Edmondson Park on-demand bus service?

  1. What measures are in place to ensure the on-demand bus service is inclusive and accessible?

A response to these Questions with Notice will be provided in the 31 July 2019 Council Business Papers


37

ITEM NO:       QWN 04

FILE NO:        142113.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Oversized Load Carrying Vehicles

 

I have received numerous complaints from residents in new release suburbs about oversized load carrying vehicle movements in the early morning. These vehicles are used to transport other vehicles used in the construction of new housing developments. 

 

Because of their size and speed the RMS restricts their movement to not impede the peak hour traffic. However, this means residents are burdened with significant amounts of sound and light pollution at all hours of the night.

 

Surely a common sense solution can be found to lessen the impact on residents.

 

Please address the following:

 

  1. What is the time window imposed by the RMS for transporting an oversized load carrying vehicle?

 

  1. Does Council also impose time restrictions? 

 

  1. Can Council legally impose time restrictions?

 

  1. Are nearby residents within the vicinity of the drop off point informed about these movements beforehand?

 

  1. Is it legally possible to enforce that nearby residents of the drop off point are informed about these movements?

 

A response to these Questions with Notice will be provided in the 31 July 2019 Council Business Papers.

 

 


39

ITEM NO:       QWN 05

FILE NO:        144178.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Occupation Certificates

This item was dealt with later in the meeting in closed session.

ITEM NO:       QWN 06

FILE NO:        144983.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Smoking Kiosks

 

Please address the following:

 

1.    Are smoking kiosks legal in NSW?

 

 

A response to this Question with Notice will be provided in the 31 July 2019 Council Business Papers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    


39

 

ITEM NO:       COM 03

FILE NO:        136649.2019

SUBJECT:     Disaster Relief Policy

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

  1. Receives and notes this report; and

 

  1. Endorses the Disaster Relief Policy.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council notes this report.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


 

PRESENTATIONS BY COUNCILLORS

 

  1. Clr Harle made a presentation to Council regarding the recent National General Assembly Conference in Canberra as shown below.

 

The Mayor, several Councillors and I attended the National Local Government Association Conference held in Canberra between the 15th and 19th of June.

 

The conference purpose is to represent Local Government areas and Councils from all over Australia to lobby the Federal Government for support in addressing issues relevant to Local Councils. To some extent it is like our Local Government Conference, which is scheduled for later this year and to be held at William Inglis Conference Centre at Warwick Farm, where it is aimed at the State Government for support on issues raised by Local Government.

 

As a Councillor I found the conference very informative as it gave me an opportunity to appreciate the concerns and issues that affect Councils across Australia, not just NSW.

 

Of interest to me was a highly informative session on the increasing problem of waste disposal, waste recycling and the State Governments’ levy on waste disposed of in landfill that Councils want returned to them in exchange for projects that reduce waste going to landfill. That topic generated considerable debate.

 

Unfortunately, I was less impressed with the lack of information regarding the millions of tons of combustible waste that goes to landfill every week, and particularly plastics that are currently not easy to recycle and take up huge areas of valuable storage space. I am referring to plastics that range between 2 and 7 on the scale within the recycle triangle, with seven being extremely difficult to recycle if ever.

 

PET plastics such as drink containers rate a 1 and are the most valuable and easily turned into products including clothes.

 

 

I asked questions relating to the progress of Waste to Energy Incinerators that produce cheap electricity for community use as is done in many countries throughout the world with few negative effects on the planet and arguably on “global warming” or “climate change”.

 

The response was that in Western Australia a 17-Megawatt Unit has been approved and is currently in the construction phase.  It will produce enough electricity to power around 21,000 homes, with another plant under evaluation.

 

Due to the extremely high operating temperature, around 1800 degrees Celsius, and a waste reduction ratio of 20 to 1, few if any toxic materials are produced. Extremely effective filter systems remove any that may be produced. The ash is used for road construction and building materials while the heat produces steam driving a Turbine Generator/Alternator to produce electricity.

The waste heat may also be used to heat land for agricultural purposes and/or


community use such as swimming pools near the plant.


Some of the exhaust air, which is super clean and mainly Carbon Dioxide may be directed into green houses as food for rapid plant growth.

 

The points of interest are that these Waste to Energy Incinerators would eliminate the problems of disposing single use plastics ending up in the environment.

At present, it is uneconomical to recycle most plastics and so they are either stored for much later use or are buried in landfill and remain there for


thousands of years.

Since plastics are basically a product of oil and coal, would it not be better to incinerate these now and use the energy stored to produce electricity rather than bury it and pollute the environment for who knows how long?

Modern Waste to Energy Incinerators are a far better alternative to landfill with more than 170 currently in use around the world.

It is dilemma all Councils currently face, but who will take positive steps to address it?

 

 

  1. Clr Hagarty made a presentation to Council regarding the 60th anniversary function of the City of Liverpool and District Historical Society which he attended on Saturday 22 June 2019 with the Mayor, Councillors Shelton and Kaliyanda, the Federal Member for Werriwa Anne Stanley and former Councillor Alf Vella.  

 

  1. Clr Kaliyanda made a presentation to Council regarding the International Eid Festival Opening Ceremony which she attended on Saturday 8 June 2019. She advised that the organisers wished to thank Council for the ease in accessing the Council facilities as well as the ability to hold the function within the Liverpool LGA.

 

  1. Clr Rhodes tabled a petition on behalf of residents opposed to the demolition of Phillips Park tennis courts. 

 


Clr Ayyad retired from the meeting at 7.46pm.

 

Confidential Items

ITEM NO:       CONF 01

FILE NO:        135568.2019

SUBJECT:     Appointment of Community representatives on Civic Advisory Committee

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council appoints June Young (to continue as one of the community representatives) and Ellie Roberston to the Civic Advisory Committee as community representatives.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

1.    Appoints June Young (to continue as one of the community representatives) and Ellie Roberston to the Civic Advisory Committee as community representatives; and

 

2.    Amongst other members re-endorse all former Mayors and Councillors of Liverpool City Council.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

                       


45

ITEM NO:       CONF 02

FILE NO:        137304.2019

SUBJECT:     Fire and Rescue NSW Referrals

 

This item was dealt with later in the meeting in closed session.

 

ITEM NO:       CONF 03

FILE NO:        140103.2019

SUBJECT:     Acquisition of Lot 2 DP 1250846 being Part of 19-21 Enterprise Circuit, Prestons for drainage purposes.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1.       Approves the acquisition of Lot 2 DP 1250846, being part of 19-21 Enterprise Circuit, Prestons on the terms outlined in this confidential report;

2.       Authorises the CEO or her delegated officer to execute any document, under Power of Attorney, necessary to give effect to this decision;

3.       Classify the land as “operational’ in accordance with section 31(2) of the Local Government Act 1993; and

4.       Keeps confidential this report pursuant to the provisions of section 10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993 as this information would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.  

 

CLOSED SESSION

 

Mayor Waller advised that Council would now move into Closed Session to deal with Items CONF 02, QWN 05 and QWN 02 pursuant to the provisions of S10(A)(2(g) of the Local Government Act as the items contain advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

Prior to moving into Closed Session, Mayor Waller called a short recess at 7.50pm to allow the gallery to leave the Chambers.

Council meeting resumed at 7.53pm in Closed Session with all Councillors present except Clr Hadchiti.

 

Clr Hadchiti returned to the Chambers at 7.54pm.

ITEM NO:       CONF 02

FILE NO:        137304.2019

SUBJECT:     Fire and Rescue NSW Referrals

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    In relation to 1 Browne Parade Warwick Farm (also known as 34-40 Hume Highway Warwick Farm)

a)    notes the inspection report by Fire and Rescue NSW, as shown in Attachment 1; and

 

b)    exercises its power to issue a Fire Safety Order as recommended by Council’s Fire Safety Officer to address the identified fire safety deficiencies. 

 

2.   In relation to 14 Homepride Parade Warwick Farm

a)    notes the inspection report by Fire and Rescue NSW, as shown in Attachment 2; and

b)    exercises its power to issue a Fire Safety Order as recommended by Council’s Fire Safety Officer to address the identified fire safety deficiencies.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty               Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That Council:

 

1.    In relation to 1 Browne Parade Warwick Farm (also known as 34-40 Hume Highway Warwick Farm)

a)    notes the inspection report by Fire and Rescue NSW, as shown in Attachment 1; and

 

b)    exercises its power to issue a Fire Safety Order as recommended by Council’s Fire Safety Officer to address the identified fire safety deficiencies. 

 

2.    In relation to 14 Homepride Parade Warwick Farm

 

a)   notes the inspection report by Fire and Rescue NSW, as shown in Attachment 2; and

b)   exercises its power to issue a Fire Safety Order as recommended by Council’s Fire Safety Officer to address the identified fire safety deficiencies.

3.    Write to the relevant State Minister to lobby for similar initiatives to the Victorian government in relation to cladding and other strata issues.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


47

 

Clr Hadid left the Chambers at 8:17pm.

Clr Hadid returned to the Chambers at 8:19pm.

ITEM NO:       QWN 05

FILE NO:        144178.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Occupation Certificates

 

Please address the following:

 

  1. In the event Council becomes aware that there is a possibility of a private certifier issuing occupation certificates for properties that Council believes do not comply fully with  conditions of consent, is the option of applying to the courts for an injunction to prevent these certificates from being issued available to Council?

 

A response to this Question with Notice will be provided in the 31 July 2019 Council Business Papers.

 

 

COUNCIL DECISION:

 

A discussion took place in relation to the above item and a verbal response was provided.

It was agreed that a written response be provided at a later date.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


49

ITEM NO:       QWN 02

FILE NO:        138841.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Voluntary Planning Agreements (VPA's)

 

Please address the following:

 

1.    Are there current issues or issues looming with any VPA’s the Council has entered into?

 

Response 

 

Council has utilised voluntary planning agreements to deliver a range of public benefits to the City over a number of years to support rezoning of land or specific development applications. Generally, these agreements between developers and Council operate successfully with little interaction with Council. However, given the sometimes complex nature of development, there are can be challenges with the implementation of VPAs.

 

At present, there are a number of executed VPAs that have outstanding work items. These VPAs, as well as recently completed VPAs, are available here - https://www.liverpool.nsw.gov.au/development/planning-the-future/planning-agreements.

 

The following VPAs have complexities that may present a challenge to Council in relation to delivery of specific items:

 

Location

Overview

Matters being monitored

Action

Shepherd Street

·         Agreement with Coronation, Shepherd Street Developments and Shepherd Property Nominee.

·         Range of VPA items include:

o   Shuttle bus service

o   Bike share pods

o   Car share spaces

o   Woodbrook Road underpass

o   Bank stabilisation

o   Pedestrian and cycle path

o   Riparian zone rehabilitation

·         Provision of infrastructure items linked to number of dwellings with occupation certificates (OC).

·         Significant infrastructure items required at the 500th and 600th OC (currently 309 OCs issued).

 

·         Final sign-off on portion of pedestrian/cycle path constructed along Georges River.

·         Payment of funds, in lieu of works is an option for works within Lighthorse Park, to allow council to integrate works in line with the Masterplan for this land.

·         Timing of the delivery of the infrastructure items.

·         Community issues as residents begin to occupy apartments at a point when all adjacent public improvement works are incomplete.

·         Direct contact with private certifier of the project to reinforce the obligations under the development consent and the VPA (formal letter sent 21/05/2019).

1.    Ongoing liaison with Coronation to facilitate delivery of items through meetings and formal correspondence.

 

2.    Monitor the issuing of OCs in collaboration with the private certifier.

 

3.    Council communications team to work with Coronation on messaging to new residents.

 

 

Brickmakers Drive

 

·         Agreement with Mirvac Homes and New Brighton Golf Club.

·         Range of VPA items include:

o   pedestrian/cycle paths

o   landscaping and improvements to open space areas

o   public access to Georges River

o   local drainage facilities, and

o   land dedication along Georges River.

·         Provision of infrastructure items generally linked to release of specific Subdivision Certificates.

·         Residential component of development completed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

·         Key issue is coordination of delivery of pedestrian/cycle path

·         Provision of pedestrian/cycle path through Council land and along river frontage still outstanding.

·         Resolving issues with delivery of final part of pedestrian/cycle path will enable the remainder of outstanding items to be delivered.

 

1.    Continue to liaise with developer to resolve issues associated with the delivery of path on Council land and adjacent to the Georges River.

Warwick Farm – Coopers Paddock

·         Agreement with Australian Turf Club.

·         Range of VPA items include:

o   Remediation of the designated land

o   Environmental management of the designated land

o   Ecological offset works

o   Traffic improvements, including road widening, intersections and services, and

o   Shared bike/pedestrian paths.

·         Provision of infrastructure items related to timing of subdivision of occupation certificates

·         Maintenance period associated with Road widening about to expire in next two months.

·         Awaiting completion of shared pathway through Coopers Paddock to connect up with GMD.

·         Land swaps are yet to occur along GMD - awaiting DA from ATC

·         The Vegetation Management Plan for Coopers Paddock has been approved. Now needs to be implemented by ATC prior to handing over to Council.

·         Balance of Coopers Paddock is to be handed over to Council when works are completed.

1.    Continue to work proactively with ATC on various remaining outstanding items.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That a further report be brought back to Council on the matter.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

OPEN SESSION

 

Council moved back into Open Session at 8.30am.

 

Mayor Waller then read out the outcome of items QWN 02, QWN 05 and CONF 02 which were considered in Closed Session.

 


51

 

THE MEETING CLOSED AT 8.31pm.

 

 

<Signature>

Name: Wendy Waller

Title:    Mayor

Date:   31 July 2019

I have authorised a stamp bearing my signature to be affixed to the pages of the Minutes of the Council Meeting held on  26 June 2019. I confirm that Council has adopted these Minutes as a true and accurate record of the meeting.

 

    


55

Ordinary Meeting 31 July 2019

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 01

Draft Liverpool Pioneers' Memorial Park Conservation Management Plan

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Celebrate diversity, promote inclusion and recognise heritage

File Ref

120970.2019

Report By

Thomas Wheeler - Heritage Officer

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

A draft conservation management plan has been prepared for Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park. The conservation management plan will guide the long term conservation and maintenance of the park and cemetery. This report seeks approval from Council to place the draft document on public exhibition.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Place the Draft Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park Conservation Management Plan on exhibition for a period of 28 days; and

 

2.    Delegates to the CEO the finalisation of the Draft Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park Conservation Management Plan if no submissions are received; or receive a further report outlining details of the submissions received at the conclusion of the exhibition period.

 

REPORT

 

Background

 

Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park was established in 1820 as the new Liverpool Cemetery, replacing the Old Liverpool Cemetery, now known as Apex Park. The cemetery was part of the Glebe lands associated with St Luke’s Anglican Church and was under the care and control of the church.

 

The cemetery remained in operation until 1945 and records indicate a combined burial list of approximately 15,000 people were interned at Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park and Apex Park collectively.

 

Burials include prominent local identities such as Reverend Robert Cartwright, Thomas Moore, Dr Charles Throsby and the Bull and Marsden families. There were also thousands of unmarked pauper burials from the Liverpool Asylum or Former Liverpool State Hospital, including American Civil War veteran Murtha Doyle.

 

Liverpool City Council took control of the cemetery in the 1960s, and park modifications were undertaken which included the removal of headstones with only the most prominent colonial identities retained.

 

Between 2008 and 2016 Liverpool City Council completed restoration work including the reinstallation of over 500 headstones in Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park and the construction of formal landscaped spaces.

 

Conservation Management Plans

 

The intent of a conservation management plan (CMP) is to complete a heritage assessment of a heritage object and prepare a document to guide future maintenance and conservation work.

 

The document has been prepared in accordance with NSW Government guidelines for best practice heritage management and the Burra Charter. The Burra Charter, adopted in 1979 (amended 1989 and 2013), defines the best practice standard based on an international UN and International Council on Monuments & Sites (ICOMOS) guidelines for managing cultural heritage places in Australia that has been endorsed by Heritage Council of NSW and the NSW Land & Environment Court.

 

The document will assist in future planning for the activation and management of the northern end of the park, and the conservation and restoration of the headstones and memorials located within the park.

 

The process to develop a CMP is an ordered methodology involving the following steps:

1.   Identification of the place through analysis of its history and current form

2.   Assessment of the significance of the place as a whole and its elements against a standard set of criteria

3.   Analysis of relevant issues, constraints and opportunities affecting the object

4.   Recommendations for policies, strategies and actions to conserve the heritage values of the place and guide management decision making

 

 

 

 

 

 

Draft Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park Conservation Management Plan Outcomes

 

The CMP recommends conservation management policies to retain and enhance the park’s heritage values, provides guidelines for future park improvements and provides an interpretation strategy for communicating the heritage values of the park to present and future communities.

 

Key recommendations of the conservation management plan are:

·    Endorse this CMP as the guiding document for Council’s decision making in regard to the future conservation and management of Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park

·    For all work that requires excavation or ground disturbance, an archaeological permit from the NSW Heritage Division is to be applied for and received prior to commencing work

·    Manage Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park in accordance with current best practice and statutory requirements to retain and conserve its heritage values

·    Implement identified conservation policies in this CMP to achieve the above outcomes

·    Nominate Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park for inclusion on the State Heritage Register (with exemptions for day to day maintenance)

·    Enhance the landscaping and consider improving lighting and security cameras to prevent vandalism and anti-social behaviour

·    Regularly assess the condition of all monuments and memorials and undertake on going preventative maintenance and physical conservation

 

Public Exhibition

 

It is proposed to place the Draft Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park Conservation Management Plan on public exhibition and invite comment through the following means:

 

·    A notice in “Liverpool City Council News” in the Liverpool Leader, local newspaper inviting people to comment.

·    The draft document being placed on the “On Public Exhibition” page of Council’s website.

·    Providing an electronic copy to members of Council’s Heritage Advisory Committee.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Preserve and maintain heritage, both landscape and cultural as urban development takes place.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Draft Liverpool Pioneers Memorial Park CMP v2. (Under separate cover)

2.         Appendix 2a. (Under separate cover)

3.         Appendix 2b. (Under separate cover)

4.         Appendix 2c. (Under separate cover)

5.         Appendix 2d. (Under separate cover)

6.         Appendix 2e. (Under separate cover)

7.         28887_F5_ArchaeologicalPotential. (Under separate cover)

8.         28887_F4_Location_Headstones. (Under separate cover)

9.         28887_F3_HeritageListed. (Under separate cover)

10.       28887_F2_StudyArea (Under separate cover)

11.       28887_F1_Locality. (Under separate cover)  


59

Ordinary Meeting 31 July 2019

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 02

Community Participation Plan

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Encourage community participation in decision-making

File Ref

140175.2019

Report By

David Smith - Manager Planning & Transport Strategy

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

Executive Summary

 

Council is required to prepare its first Community Participation Plan (CPP) in accordance with the requirements of Division 2.6 and Schedule 1 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment (EPA) Act 1979 (the Act).

 

Clause 16 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment (Savings, Transitional and Other Provisions) Regulation 2017 requires the CPP to be adopted by 1 December 2019.

 

The purpose of the CPP is to provide a single document that the community can access and which sets out all of Council’s community participation requirements under planning legislation, including all minimum mandatory exhibition timeframes.

 

The Act outlines the principles that Council must include in the CPP, as follows:

·    The community has a right to be informed about planning matters that affect it.

·    Council will encourage effective and on-going partnerships with the community to provide meaningful opportunities for community participation in planning.

·    Planning information will be in plain language, easily accessible and in a form that facilitates community participation in planning.

·    The community will be given opportunities to participate in strategic planning as early as possible to enable community views to be genuinely considered.

·    Community participation will be inclusive and Council will actively seek views that are representative of the community.

·    Planning decisions will be made in an open and transparent way and the community will be provided with reasons for those decisions (including how community views have been taken into account).

·    Community participation methods (and the reasons given for planning decisions) will be appropriate having regard to the significance and likely impact of the proposed development.

The CPP therefore sets out when and how Council will engage with its communities across all the land use planning functions it performs.

 

For strategic planning initiatives, including the Local Strategic Planning Statement, Local Environmental Plan, Development Control Plan, Development Contributions Plans, Planning Agreements and other strategic studies and plans, the requirements for public participation are aligned with the Act’s requirements and current practice.

 

For development applications, public participation requirements have been largely adapted from the existing Development Control Plan – Chapter 18 - Notification of Development Applications.

 

A change is proposed to the notification and exhibition of development applications compared to the current Chapter 18 in the DCP. It is proposed that residential flat buildings, mixed use development and shop top housing developments in the Liverpool City Centre be notified for 14 days, to align with the requirement for those types of development outside the Liverpool City Centre. Commercial buildings over 4 stories are also proposed to be notified, given the increase in high rise buildings. The notification requirements for community facilities have been amended from opposite and adjacent landowners to landowners within a 75m radius to align with the requirements for child care centres given potential traffic and noise issues associated with these land uses. The notification requirements for group homes and hostels have also been amended from opposite and adjacent landowners to landowners within a 75m radius given the sensitivity of the use.

 

Council is required to transfer all community participation requirements (sometimes referred to as notification, advertising or submission periods) from the DCP to the CPP to meet the CPP requirement under the Act. As a result, once the CPP has been adopted by Council, the existing Chapter 18 of the DCP will be revoked. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.       Endorses the draft Community Participation Plan;

 

2.       Place the draft Community Participation Plan on public exhibition for a minimum period of 28 days in accordance with Schedule 1 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979; and

 

3.       Delegates to the CEO the finalisation of the Community Participation Plan and subsequent amendments to the Liverpool Development Control Plans should no submissions be received; or receive a further report outlining details of the submissions received at the conclusion of the exhibition period.

 

 

REPORT

 

In March 2018, changes to the Environmental Planning and Assessment (EPA) Act 1979 set out new requirements for all Council’s to prepare a Community Participation Plan (CPP) and for it to be adopted by 1 December 2019.

 

The CPP sets out when and how Council will engage with the community as part of the planning functions it performs (strategic planning and development assessment) under the Act.

 

The objectives of the draft CPP are to:

 

·    provide opportunities for all members of the community to participate in planning decisions to achieve better planning outcomes, in an open and transparent process;

·    ensure the community understands how they can participate in planning decisions;

·    ensure that the needs and concerns of the community are identified and addressed wherever possible;

·    ensure Council’s strategic planning reflects the aspirations of the community and partners; and

·    ensure Council meets its legislative requirements in regards to community engagement.

The CPP (Attachment 1) outlines how Council will consult with the community on all planning functions it performs, including:

 

Development Applications

 

The existing DCP - Part 1 (Chapter 18) outlines when Council will consult the community during the development assessment process. As outlined above, the public participation requirements in the CPP have been largely adapted from the existing DCP. A change is proposed to the notification and exhibition of development applications compared to the current Chapter 18 in the DCP. It is proposed that residential flat buildings, mixed use development and shop top housing developments in the Liverpool City Centre be notified for 14 days, to align with the requirement for those types of development outside the Liverpool City Centre. Commercial buildings over 4 stories are also proposed to be notified, given the increase in high rise buildings. The notification requirements for community facilities have been amended from opposite and adjacent landowners to landowners within a 75m radius to align with the requirements for child care centres given potential traffic and noise issues associated with these land uses. The notification requirements for group homes and hostels have also been amended from opposite and adjacent landowners to landowners within a 75m radius given the sensitivity of the use.

 

Council is required to transfer all community participation requirements from the DCP to the CPP to meet the CPP requirement under the Act. As a result, once the CPP has been adopted by Council, the existing Chapter 18 of the DCP will be revoked.

 

Strategic Planning

 

The CPP outlines Council’s consultation and engagement goals for the different types of plans/strategies prepared by Council and the different consultation/engagement tools that Council will use. The draft CPP generally reflects Council’s current practices of consultation and engagement and also incorporates relevant legislative requirements (e.g. minimum public exhibition periods). It is proposed that for large scale planning proposals, Council will also exhibit the planning proposal for 28 days prior to a Council decision on whether to endorse the planning proposal for a Gateway determination. Feedback from the community will be incorporated into a report to Council.  

 

Next Steps

 

Council must adopt a CPP by 1 December 2019. The next step following Council endorsement of the draft CPP is to publicly exhibit the plan for a minimum period of 28 days in accordance with the Act. This will allow the community to comment on the draft CPP and make a submission. Following the public exhibition process, if there are any submissions, a further report will be presented to Council outlining details of the submissions received.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Undertake communication practices with the community and stakeholders across a range of media.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Draft Community Participation Plan (Under separate cover)  


61

Ordinary Meeting 31 July 2019

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 03

Street Naming Request - Austral

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

146921.2019

Report By

Matthew Roberts - Graduate Strategic Planner

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The purpose of this report is to seek a Council resolution on a current street naming request in Austral.

 

The request is to replace two existing approved names Tammarin Rock Avenue and Aroona Avenue with Nino Avenue and Tony Avenue.

 

Both names have been assessed using Council’s Naming Convention Policy and in consultation with the Geographical Names Board (GNB) of NSW.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.       Supports the replacement street names for Austral noted in this report, being:

 

-      Nino Avenue; and

-      Tony Avenue.

 

2.       Authorises the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) to undertake the process of gazettal, if there are no submissions received during public exhibition.

 

 

REPORT

 

Council received a street naming application on 5 June 2019 for two proposed streets in Austral, between Seventeenth Avenue and Eighteenth Avenue.

 

Tammarin Rock Avenue was gazetted in 2017 and Aroona Avenue was gazetted in 2018. In April 2018, the applicant for the street naming application, who lives on the property through which these streets pass, proposed two replacement names in honor of her father (being Antonio Avenue and Messina Avenue). These names were not approved by the GNB.

 

Therefore, the applicant now proposes Nino Avenue and Tony Avenue to replace Tammarin Rock Avenue and Aroona Avenue. Both names have been assessed using Council’s Naming Convention Policy in consultation with the GNB (who have given in principle support to this name) and have been checked for duplication using the GNB’s Online Road Naming System.

 

The origin of these names relate to a local market gardener who previously lived on the property. Further information regarding the origin of the names can be found in the Street and Park Naming Application Form (Attachment 1).

 

Boundaries of Street Names

 

Pictured below is the extent of the proposed street names (in yellow):

 

Figure 1: Extent of Street Names

 

The southern boundary for both proposed street names is Seventeenth Avenue.

 

 

Next Steps

 

If supported by Council the above names will be placed on public exhibition for 28 days in the local newspaper and notified to the GNB and other relevant stakeholders, seeking endorsement. Relevant stakeholders include: Australia Post, NSW Ambulance, Fire and Rescue NSW, NSW Rural Fire Service, NSW State Emergency Service, NSW Volunteer Rescue Association, Roads and Maritime Services and NSW Police Force.

 

Council officers will consider all submissions during the public notification period. The three potential scenarios following exhibition are as follows:

 

·    If there are objections from the relevant agencies, Council will not proceed with the naming request. The applicant will be notified of the outcome. A report to Council will be prepared for the next available meeting outlining the reason for rejection.

 

·    If there are no objections, the naming request will proceed to the NSW Parliamentary Counsel’s Office (PCO) for gazettal under the delegation of the Chief Executive Officer (or delegate).

 

·    Any submissions from the community during the public notification period will be considered. If there is strong community opposition, or reason to reconsider the proposed names, a report will be prepared for the next available Council meeting recommending withdrawal of the naming proposal. If Council decides to support the proposal, the naming request will proceed to the PCO for gazettal under the delegation of the Chief Executive Officer (or delegate). If Council decides not to adopt the naming proposal, the applicant will be notified in writing outlining the reason for rejection.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Preserve and maintain heritage, both landscape and cultural as urban development takes place.


Civic Leadership

Foster neighbourhood pride and a sense of responsibility.

Legislative

Roads Act 1993.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Street Naming Application and Supporting Documentation


69

EGROW 03

Street Naming Request - Austral

Attachment 1

Street Naming Application and Supporting Documentation

 

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71

Ordinary Meeting 31 July 2019

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 04

Planning proposal to rezone land at 240 Governor Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Meet the challenges of Liverpool’s growing population

File Ref

158005.2019

Report By

David Smith - Manager Planning & Transport Strategy

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

Property

240 Governor Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm

Owner

Warwick Farm Central Pty Ltd

Applicant

WFC (Projects) Pty Ltd

 

 

Executive Summary

 

On 10 July 2018, Council received a planning proposal to rezone land at 240 Governor Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm from B5 Business Development to part B4 Mixed Use and part R4 High Density Residential (Attachment 1). The planning proposal also seeks to increase the floor space ratio (FSR) development standard from 0.75:1 to 3:1 (equating to approximately 87,900m2 GFA) and the height of buildings (HOB) development standard from 15m to 50m and to reduce the minimum lot size from 2000m2 to 1000m².

 

In September 2018, the Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) released the Liverpool Collaboration Area Place Strategy (Place Strategy) which designated the subject site as part of a precinct to be developed for the purposes of an innovation, research, health, advanced manufacturing precinct, excluding residential uses.

 

The proponent requested a rezoning review on 29 October 2018 as the planning proposal had been with Council for more than 90 days without a determination. On 15 April 2019, Council was informed by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) that the proponent had withdrawn the request for a rezoning review, and that the Council should make the decision on how to proceed with the planning proposal.

 

An assessment of the planning proposal was completed on behalf of Council by town planning consultants City Plan (Attachment 2). The planning proposal was referred to the Liverpool Local Planning Panel (LPP) for advice on 24 June 2019. The majority of the LPP agreed with the planning assessment report prepared by City Plan consultants that the proposal lacked strategic and site merit and provided their advice to Council that the planning proposal should not be referred to the DPIE for a Gateway determination (Attachment 3).

 

At its Ordinary meeting of 26 June 2019, Council endorsed the draft Liverpool Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) for exhibition, which designated the subject site as part of a precinct to be investigated for a “mix of uses”.

 

While noting the planning assessment report and the advice of the LPP, this report concludes that the strategic merit of the planning proposal is less certain compared with that outlined in the planning report and the LPP advice as a result of conflicting designations of future use of the site between the Place Strategy and draft LSPS.

 

It is recommended that a modified planning proposal be supported in principle by Council and forwarded to DPIE for a Gateway determination. The modifications recommended include reducing the proposed FSR to 2:1 (equating to approximately 58,600m2 GFA) and the maximum height of building to 45m to provide for approximately 500 dwellings, which is consistent with the previous planning assessment and Council report completed in 2017 and the existing R4 zone in Warwick Farm.

 

In addition, it is recommended that an updated planning agreement be negotiated with the proponent and a site specific Development Control Plan (DCP) be prepared containing site specific controls to address urban design, building massing and addressing potential environmental impacts including overshadowing. Once the planning proposal has been amended, it is recommended that the proposal be forwarded to DPIE for a Gateway determination.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Note the advice provided by the Liverpool Local Planning Panel;

 

2.   Endorses in principle the planning proposal for 240 Governor Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm, subject to the applicant submitting a modified proposal with a maximum floor space ratio (FSR) of 2:1 equating to approximately 58,600m2 GFA or 500 dwellings, apply the bonus FSR provisions contained within Clause 4.4 (2B) of the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan (LEP) to the site, a maximum height of buildings of 45m and the preparation of a site specific Development Control Plan ;

 

3.   Delegate to the CEO authority to negotiate a revised VPA offer with the proponent, agree the terms of the offer with the proponent and report back to Council the details of the VPA prior to exhibition of the planning proposal, consistent with Council’s Planning Agreements Policy;

 

4.   Endorses in principle the potential public benefit contributions of the VPA, to be further negotiated, include:

 

Monetary contributions towards the cost of local road improvements;

 

Funding appropriate road works including a 2.5m wide shared path, public domain improvements including street trees and landscaping along Governor Macquarie Drive between Hume Highway and Munday Street in accordance with Council’s design plan for the Hume Highway/Governor Macquarie Drive intersection upgrade and Warwick Street between the Hume Highway and Manning Street;

 

Improved pedestrian and bicycle access to and from the site and Warwick Farm railway station and north and south of the Hume Highway;

 

Provision of 5% of the dwelling yield as affordable housing (to be dedicated to Council) to be managed as affordable rental housing by a community housing provider; and

 

Providing a retail/commercial space in the development for a period of 5 years at a reduced commercial rent for a community organisation/s to be agreed between the proponent and Council; and

 

5.   Delegate authority to the CEO to finalise the above amendments to the planning proposal and submit the planning proposal to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for a Gateway determination with a recommendation that detailed traffic modelling, an economic impact assessment, a noise mitigation strategy and a site specific DCP be included as Gateway conditions to be satisfied prior to public exhibition.

 

Report

 

The site

 

The subject site, 240 Governor Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm (Lot 1 DP 1162276), is a 2.93 hectare triangular-shaped allotment bound by Governor Macquarie Drive, Munday Street, Manning Street, and Warwick Street (depicted in Figure 1 below). It is approximately 20m south of the Hume Highway and the entire site falls within 350m of Warwick Farm train station, which is to the west.

 

Figure 1: Site location

 

Figure 2: Aerial photograph of site

 

Locality

 

The subject site is located in Warwick Farm and is surrounded by a number of different land uses. As illustrated in Figure 1, the area immediately to the south is largely low density residential and predominantly occupied by horse stables and training facilities associated with the Warwick Farm Racecourse, located immediately to the east, across Governor Macquarie Drive. To the west, next to Warwick Farm train station, is a small clustering of two-storey townhouses. Also in proximity to the subject site is an industrial area, just south of the horse-training precinct, supporting operations such as Direct Freight, Visy and Liverpool Hospital’s bulk distribution facilities. Within the south-east section of this local area is Rosedale Park and Sydney Water’s sewerage treatment facility.

 

Background

 

The subject site was previously part of the Australian Turf Club (ATC) Warwick Farm Racecourse landholding. To improve the racecourse facilities, the ATC undertook a rationalisation of their landholdings and disposed of residual land to assist in consolidating and financing upgrades to the racecourse and thoroughbred horse facilities.

 

Liverpool Local Environmental Plan (LLEP) 2008 (Amendment 18) was gazetted on 9 December 2011, which rezoned the subject site from part RE2 Private Recreation and part R2 Low Density Residential to B5 Business Development. The amendment was supported by Council on the grounds that there was a local and regional level demand for bulky goods retailing.

 

As part of Amendment 18, a VPA between the ATC and Council required upgrades to the intersection of Governor Macquarie Drive and Munday Street, including traffic lights to accommodate additional traffic volumes. This work has been completed.

 

Following the LEP amendment, development consent was granted in February 2013 (DA-1321/2011) for a home improvement centre (a Masters development). The Woolworths Group has not developed the site and instead entered into contractual arrangements with the current applicant who is seeking to rezone the site to high density residential and mixed use. As a result, the site remains vacant.

 

In November 2015, a planning proposal was lodged with Council seeking to rezone the site from B5 Business Development to R4 High Density Residential, as follows:

 

·    Rezone the site from B5 Business Development to part R4 High Density Residential and part B4 Mixed Use;

·    Increase Height of Building (HOB) from 15m to part 45m and part 100m;

·    Increase Floor Space Ratio (FSR) from 0.75:1 to 3.5:1 (to facilitate approx. 950 residential units); and

·    Permit an additional use provision allowing up to 5,000sqm of retail floor space.

 

A report was presented to Council at its Ordinary meeting of 22 February 2017, which recommended that Council support a revised version of the proposal that included a reduced residential density with a maximum floor space ratio (FSR) of 2:1 (equating to approximately 500 residential dwellings). The report also recommended a reduction in height of buildings to no more than 45m. Council resolved to defer consideration of the planning proposal until it had adopted a broader precinct-wide strategy for Warwick Farm and directed the report be brought back to Council in July 2017.

 

At its Ordinary Meeting of 26 July 2017, a report was presented to Council on the draft Warwick Farm Precinct Strategy. Council resolved:

 

That Council:

 

1.    Prepare a draft Warwick Farm Precinct Strategy which reflects a mixed use zoning (specifically for the horse racing precinct), with the input of Councillors and residents;

 

2.    Endorse in principle the planning proposal for Lot 1 Governor Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm, subject to the applicant submitting a modified proposal with a maximum floor space ratio (FSR) of 2.2:1 which equates to approximately 500 residential units of which 10% will be dedicated to retail;

 

3.    Delegates to the CEO the authority to finalise the modified proposal and submit to DPE for Gateway approval with a recommendation that detailed traffic and flood modelling be included in Gateway conditions;

 

4.    Notes that the CEO will finalise negotiations regarding the proposed VPA and public benefit offer and any other relevant conditions as required to support the proposal, with a report to be presented to a future Council meeting; and

 

5.    Notes that funds will be sought in the Capital program in the 2017/18 budget to progress land acquisitions for the bypass road.

 

At its Ordinary meeting of 30 August 2017 Council resolved:

 

That the resolution relating to DPG 07 Draft Warwick Farm Precinct Strategy from the Council meeting 26 July 2017 be rescinded.

 

At the same meeting Council also resolved:

 

That Council endorses a vision for mixed use development comprising employment, housing and retail for the Warwick Farm Precinct.

 

The proponent lodged a request for a rezoning review with DPIE on 10 October 2017. The proposal was considered by the Sydney Western City Planning Panel on 5 February 2018, which decided that the planning proposal should not be submitted for a Gateway determination, deciding that the proposal demonstrated strategic merit but not site-specific merit. The Panel determined:

 

The proposal did not demonstrate adequate site-specific merit because of the proposed excessive height and scale which is inappropriate in this location, and would be contradictory to the scale of residential development planned and emerging closer to the Liverpool CBD.

 

On 10 July 2018, Council received a revised planning proposal seeking to rezone the site from B5 Business Development to part B4 Mixed Use and part R4 High Density Residential, with increased development yield, as described in detail below.

 

In September 2018 the Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) released the Liverpool Collaboration Area Place Strategy (Place Strategy), which designated the subject site as part of an area to be developed for the purposes of an innovation, research, health, advanced manufacturing precinct, excluding residential uses.

 

The proponent requested a rezoning review on 29 October 2018 on the current planning proposal because the planning proposal request had been with Council for more than 90 days without a determination. On 15 April 2019, Council was informed by the Department that the proponent had withdrawn the request for a rezoning review.

 

An assessment of the proposal was completed on behalf of Council by town planning consultants City Plan. The planning proposal was referred to the Liverpool Local Planning Panel (LPP) for advice. The majority of the LPP agreed with the City Plan assessment that the proposal lacked strategic and site merit and advised that the proposal should not be referred to the Department for a Gateway determination.

 

At its Ordinary Meeting of 26 June 2019, Council endorsed the draft Liverpool Local Strategic Planning Statement for exhibition, which designated the subject site as part of a precinct to be investigated “for a mix of uses”.

 

The current proposal

 

This planning proposal seeks to amend the LEP to facilitate a mixed-use development comprising residential development, commercial development and open space. It is envisaged that the proposed development would support approximately 830 dwellings, 5,000m² of retail commercial floor space (including a supermarket) and 7,000m² of open space.  The proposal would be achieved by the following amendments to the LEP:

 

·    An amendment to the Land Zoning Map to rezone the site from B5 Business Development to part B4 Mixed Use and part R4 High Density Residential (shown in Figure 3);

·    An amendment to the FSR Map from 0.75:1 to 3:1;

·    An amendment to the HOB Map from 15 metres to 50 metres; and

·    An amendment to the Lot Size Map from 2 Hectares to 1,000m²

 

The planning proposal does not seek to apply any statutory controls to ensure the indicated mix of commercial, residential and open space land uses.

 

Figure 3: Proposed land zoning map (looking north)

Figure 4: Proposed massing (view from the Hume Highway looking south)

 

 

Figure 5: Illustrative Masterplan

 

Figure 6: Artist impression of plaza

 

 


 

Voluntary planning agreement offer

 

The proponent has provided a letter of offer regarding a voluntary planning agreement (VPA) which includes the following:

 

·    Provision of 5% of dwelling yield realised as affordable housing (to be retained in the ownership of the developer but managed as affordable housing by a housing provider to be agreed with Council for the life of the development);

 

·    Landscape embellishment of land between Warwick Street and the Hume Highway between Manning Street and Governor Macquarie Drive; and

 

·    A retail/commercial space for a period of 5-10 years at a reduced commercial rent for a community organisation/s to be agreed between the proponent and the developer.

 

The VPA is offered in addition to the required Section 7.11 development contributions, payable as part of any future development applications, in accordance with Council’s Liverpool Contributions Plan 2009.

 

City Plan consultants has provided the following advice relating to the offer:

 

Through the VPA, the applicant proposes 5% of the dwelling yield to be provided as affordable rental housing. This would represent approximately 41 dwellings based on the concepts that have been prepared in support of the planning proposal. The dwellings would remain in the ownership of the applicant but would be managed as affordable housing by a housing provider to be agreed with Council for the life of the development.

 

Considering the existing economic disadvantage in the locality and uplift intended to be achieved by the applicant, Council considers that a minimum of 10% affordable housing would help achieve the optimum benefit for the community. With regards to relevant affordable housing policy, it is understood that the GSC are developing Affordable Rental Housing Targets and that Council will establish affordable housing demand as part and local housing strategy which is due for exhibition in July 2019. Until the targets and demand have been established, it is considered a 5% provision is acceptable at this time.

 

It is considered that the VPA offer should be expanded to include at a minimum:

 

·    A monetary contribution toward the cost of local road improvements.  The Council report of February 2017 noted that the proponent had earlier offered a contribution of $10,000 per unit for similar purposes, an amount relevant to VPA negotiations in relation to the current proposal.  This contribution could be directed towards local road improvements such as:

 

Traffic calming and new vehicle routes to address the current heavy vehicle traffic conflicts within the Warwick Farm horse training precinct; and

A potential new connection between Newbridge Road and GMD, via a new bridge over the Georges River and potential development sites within Moore Point, south of the river.

 

·    Funding appropriate road widening and a 2.5m wide shared path, public domain improvements including street trees and landscaping along Governor Macquarie Drive between Hume Highway and Munday Street in accordance with Council’s design plan for the Hume Highway/Governor Macquarie Drive intersection upgrade and Warwick Street between the Hume Highway and Manning Street

 

·    Improved pedestrian and bicycle access to and from the site and Warwick Farm railway station and north and south of the Hume Highway.

 

·    Provision of 5% of the dwelling yield as affordable housing (to be dedicated to Council) to be managed as affordable rental housing by a community housing provider.

 

·    Providing a retail/commercial space in the development for a period of 5 years at a reduced commercial rent for a community organisation/s to be agreed between the proponent and Council.

 

This report recommends that Council delegate to the CEO authority to negotiate a revised VPA offer with the proponent and report back to Council the details of the amended VPA prior to exhibition of the planning proposal.

 

Assessment of the current proposal

 

According to A guide to preparing planning proposals published by DPIE, a planning proposal must have strategic and site merit to warrant the issue of a Gateway determination. In order to have strategic merit, a planning proposal must be consistent with higher order planning strategies (regional and district planning strategies) and the LSPS. Strategic planning for this precinct is not yet finalised, but is characterised by the Western City District Plan, the Place Strategy and the draft LSPS.

 

Planning Priority W2 of the Western City District Plan (WCDP) states that Collaboration areas are a “non-statutory initiative”. The Place Strategy itself specifically states in Chapter 11 that “implementing the Liverpool Collaboration Area Place Strategy requires collective action and joining of resources from all stakeholders, various levels of government and the private sector. The Strategy is a decision support tool that recognises that State agencies and Council will undertake their own review and prioritisation processes before committing to infrastructure investment”.

 

Chapter 11 of the Place Strategy also states that the GSC will include the Place Strategy’s objectives and actions in future updates to the WCDP giving them a statutory basis. The WCDP has not been amended and therefore the Place Strategy, as a non-statutory initiative and decision support tool, may not be afforded the statutory weight of that plan.

 

The draft LSPS is currently on public exhibition and has not yet been finalised. Nevertheless, it has been endorsed by Council and therefore must also be afforded the weight of a draft local strategic planning statement for assessment purposes.

 

 

Strategic Merit

 

The Greater Sydney Regional Plan (A metropolis of three cities) and the WCDP were finalised by the Greater Sydney Commission in March 2018.

 

Section 3.8(2) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment (EP&A) Act 1979 requires that:

 

In preparing a planning proposal under section 3.33, the planning proposal authority is to give effect:

 

(a)  to any district strategic plan applying to the local government area to which the planning proposal relates (including any adjoining local government area)

 

The current planning proposal to rezone the site must therefore “give effect” to the Western City District Plan, which in turn must give effect to the objectives, strategies and actions specified in the regional strategic plan, A Metropolis of Three Cities.

 

Objective 5 of A Metropolis of Three Cities, “Benefits of growth realised by collaboration of governments, community and business”, describes the objective of the Collaboration Areas as being a place based process.

 

WCDP Planning Priority W2, Working through collaboration, identifies the Liverpool Collaboration Area as follows:

 

Liverpool’s Central Business District (CBD), the health and education precinct and nearby residential and industrial land areas. It considers the Warwick Farm Precinct; the Moorebank Intermodal Terminal, which is under-construction; and the draft Georges River Masterplan

 

The underpinning objective of the Place Strategy was to facilitate strong employment growth in the Liverpool Collaboration Area. Section 4.1 states, “The collaborative process concluded that a profile providing strong employment growth in Liverpool is preferred, requiring retention of employment lands in strategic locations”. In line with this preference, the Place Strategy designated the subject site as part of an innovation, research, health, advanced manufacturing precinct, described as “a high-tech, transit-oriented, advanced manufacturing business park that leverages the growth of the health, education and equine sectors, excluding residential development.” The designation is illustrated in Figure 7 below.

 

Figure 7: Liverpool Collaboration Area Place Strategy

 

Priority 7 of the Place Strategy, relates to the role and function of employment and urban services land and includes the following Action:

 

Action 21: Protect employment land on the western side of the Georges River (Scrivener Street and Munday Street) to support health related advanced manufacturing, med-tech and educational facilities.

 

Planning Priority W9 - Growing and strengthening the Metropolitan cluster - identifies the site as an, “Indicative location of existing jobs and services in centre”, as illustrated in Figure 8 below.

 

Figure 8: Extract form WCDP – Priority W9 - Location of existing jobs and services

WCDP Planning Priority W10 - Maximising freight and logistics opportunities and planning and managing industrial and urban services land - describes land currently zoned for employment uses (including subject site) within the Liverpool Collaboration Area as being “Review and Manage”, indicating that:

 

The Greater Sydney Commission will review all industrial and urban services land under this approach to either confirm its retention (as described in the approach above) or manage uses to allow sites to transition to higher-order employment activities (such as business parks) and seek appropriate controls to maximise business and employment outcomes.

 

Draft Liverpool Local Strategic Planning Statement

 

At its Ordinary meeting of 26 June 2019, Council resolved to endorse the draft LSPS and placed it on public exhibition for a period of 6 weeks. The draft LSPS describes the subject site being part of an area to, “investigate a mix of uses”, as depicted in Figure 9 below.

Figure 9: Liverpool City and Surrounds Structure Plan from draft LSPS

LSPS local planning priority 7, Housing choice for different needs, with density focused in the City Centre and centres well serviced by public transport, states that Council will “Concentrate residential development in … existing centres with high amenity that are well serviced by public transport”. This planning proposal is generally consistent with the above local planning priority as the site is well serviced by public transport.

 

Section 3.9 of the EP&A Act 1979, Local strategic planning statement of councils, contains subsection (3A) which states,

 

The council for an area that is in the Greater Sydney Region must not make a local strategic planning statement unless the Greater Sydney Commission has advised the council in writing that the Commission supports the statement as being consistent with the applicable regional and district strategic plans...”

 

The draft LSPS is currently on exhibition and has been afforded the weight of a draft plan for the purposes of the assessment of this planning proposal.

 

Advice of the Liverpool Local Planning Panel (LPP)

 

Council engaged town planning consultancy City Plan to undertake an assessment of the merits of the proposal and prepare a planning assessment report. City Plan’s assessment of the proposal was completed prior to Council endorsing the draft LSPS and did not therefore consider this in its assessment of the proposal. City Plan’s assessment also afforded statutory weight to the Place Strategy.

 

City Plan’s assessment concluded that the proposal lacked strategic merit. The assessment was based primarily on the fact that the proposed rezoning contradicts the Place Strategy, but also on a perceived inconsistency with WCDP Planning Priority W10 and the imperative to retain urban services land (i.e. employment land).

 

Based on City Plan’s assessment, the majority of the LPP concluded that the proposal lacked strategic merit. A minority (1 of the 4) of the LPP considered that the Place Strategy did not hold strategic weight as it is not a statutory document and determined that the proposal did have strategic merit considering the proximity of the subject site to the Warwick Farm railway station.

 

The advice of the LPP is as follows:

 

The majority of the Panel agrees with the consultant’s assessment of strategic and site specific merit of the proposal. While the strategic policy context of the site might be uncertain given the elected Council’s decision not to endorse the Greater Sydney Commission Place Strategy, the planning proposal must be assessed against the place strategy and district plan as they presently stand. The planning proposal does not have strategic merit having regard to the place strategy.

 

One of the Panel members does not endorse the consultant’s assessment and recommendation. The member considers that the highest and best use of the site given its proximity to Warwick Farm railway station is mixed use including high density residential. There is no evidence to support the demand for high density employment use on this site.

 

It is noted that LPP’s advice was provided prior to Council endorsing the draft LSPS and they did not take the draft LSPS into account in their deliberations. It is clear that the proposal is not supported by the Place Strategy (which has not been endorsed by Council, but has been adopted by the GSC), which views the subject site for employment uses only. By contrast, the draft LSPS (which has been endorsed by Council) and is currently on exhibition, seeks to investigate the potential for a mix of uses at and around the subject site. Neither the place strategy nor the draft LSPS are to be afforded definitive/statutory planning weight for the reasons discussed above.

 

Site specific merit

 

The report prepared by City Plan concluded that the proposal lacked site-specific merit. In its advice to Council regarding the planning proposal, the majority of the LPP endorsed City Plan’s assessment and concluded that the proposal lacked strategic and site merit.

 

As noted above, a report was considered by Council at its February 2017 meeting, which assessed the merits of a similar proposal at the subject site, which sought to rezone the subject site from B5 Business Development to R4 High Density Residential. The February 2017 report recommended that Council give in principle support to the proposed rezoning, but only on the basis of a more modest outcome of a floor space ratio of 2:1, a maximum height of buildings standard of 45m resulting in approximately 500 dwellings.

 

The consideration that informed the 2017 Council report to reduce the proposed density was:

 

The subject site adjoins a number of non-residential land uses. It is also separated from other high density residential areas by the Warwick Farm railway station. By way of comparison, the northern edge of the Liverpool CBD in existing R4 areas has an FSR of 1.5:1 - 2:1 and a HOB of 35m-45m. The planning proposal as submitted is seeking a density (FSR) and building heights that that would be twice that of the northern edges of the Liverpool City Centre. When considering the urban context of the Liverpool CBD and the spatial hierarchy of the city, the scale of the proposed development in proximity to the CBD would undermine the predominance, legibility and orderly planning of the Liverpool City Centre as a ‘strategic centre’.

 

The proposed reduced density of an FSR of 2:1 will result in a built form outcome which is more compatible with surrounding development and more appropriate in this location.

 

It is further noted that the Western Sydney City Planning Panel, in its consideration of a rezoning review lodged for the subject site with respect to the previous proposal in February 2018, decided that the proposal lacked site merit. It determined that:

 

The proposal did not demonstrate adequate site-specific merit because of the proposed excessive height and scale which is inappropriate in this location, and would be contradictory to the scale of residential development planned and emerging closer to the Liverpool CBD.

 

While the current proposal seeks to rezone the subject site as part B4 Mixed Use and part R4 High Density Residential, the assessment of the site-specific merits of the proposal are consistent. A reduced density of 2:1 would result in a built form outcome more compatible with surrounding development and more appropriate in this location. The February 2017 Council report also recommended that a maximum height of building standard of 45m be permitted on-site, to minimise adverse impacts on surrounding lower density residential areas.

It is therefore recommended that Council support an amended planning proposal by reducing the FSR to 2:1, equating to an approximately 500 dwellings and building height to no more than 45m and delegate authority to the CEO to revise the planning proposal prior to submission to DPIE for a Gateway determination.

 

Flooding

 

With respect to the natural environment, the assessment report notes that the subject site is flood prone, as follows:

 

The site is located on the floodplain of Georges River and is wholly affected by flooding under the 1% Annual Exceedance Probability (AEP) event. The planning proposal is accompanied by a Flood Impact Assessment (FIA) by FloodMit which confirms the proposal seeks to fill the majority of the site to the 1% AEP level. The FIA confirms that the impact of the proposed filling is not significant and provides alternative mitigation options to mitigate against any adverse impacts of flooding. The applicant has considered filling part of the site and providing compensatory excavation on-site.

 

The Place Strategy requires that a comprehensive flood study be prepared for the Georges River. The assessment report by City Plan states that as the flooding study has not yet been prepared, the proposal is premature. However, Council’s Floodplain and Water Management team consider that the planning proposal can be supported on flooding grounds as long as it is carried out in compliance with the requirements of Council’s Flood Policy and the NSW Floodplain Development Manual (2005).

 

The subject site is located on the floodplain of Georges River and it is affected by flooding under the 1% Annual Exceedance Probability (AEP) event. The flood impact assessment by FloodMit demonstrated that the impacts of filling of floodplain for the proposed development is not significant and assessed alternative mitigation options to mitigate adverse impacts of flooding. The consultant has proposed filling part of the site and providing compensatory excavation on-site. The proposed mitigation option is considered satisfactory.

 

The flood impact assessment by FloodMit demonstrated evacuation strategy of the site during design flood event for the proposed development. Council consider that flood evacuation strategy should be developed considering broader development context of the area of Warwick Farm and Liverpool and should be supported by the SES.

 

In view of manageable risks associated with flooding on future developments of the site, the subject rezoning proposal can be supported subject to development of the site be carried out in compliance with the requirements of Council’s Flood Policy  and the NSW Floodplain Development Manual (2005).

 

It is anticipated that were the proposal to receive a Gateway determination, the concurrence of the State Emergency Services (SES) would be required to enable the proposal to proceed.

 

Traffic and Transport

 

The assessment report prepared by City Plan noted that,

 

Action 1 of the Place Strategy requires an integrated transport strategy to be prepared that applies movement and place and addresses the transport challenges associated with delivering the vision, shared objectives and growth profile. The outcome of the transport strategy is fundamental to establish the capacity and viability of land and infrastructure to support the future growth within the Collaboration Area. The transport strategy will be led by TfNSW/RMS and supported by Council. While the Place Strategy identifies the strategy will be completed by mid-2019, TfNSW has confirmed it is expected to take a year (i.e. mid-2020) to complete.

 

Should Council support the proposal and it receives a Gateway determination, it is likely that DPIE will require the proposal be referred to TfNSW for comment. Considering the fact that the integrated transport strategy has not yet been prepared for the Collaboration Area, it is further possible that TfNSW may require the developer to make “satisfactory arrangements” via Clause 6.4A of LLEP 2008 to help fund improvements to regional transport infrastructure.

 

Council’s traffic and transport team have identified the following issues pertaining to traffic impacts related to the proposed rezoning which the proponent will need to address in a revised planning proposal.

 

Traffic Generation

 

The planning proposal assesses a projected traffic generation of 286 vehicle trips per hour (vtph) (AM peak) and 290 vtph (PM peak) for the proposal, similar to the approved Masters development with 276 vtph (AM peak) and 385 vtph (PM peak). This is based on traffic generation rates of 0.15 and 0.21 vehicles per hour per apartment for high density dwellings during weekday morning and afternoon peak hours respectively.

 

These rates are based on surveyed sites within close proximity to public transport service and high percentage of public transport mode share such as Parramatta, Chatswood and Strathfield areas. ABS Census data (2016) indicates that approximately 55-60% of residents in the immediate surrounds of Warwick Farm station use a car to travel to work, whilst areas such as Strathfield and Parramatta are in the region of 20-30%.

 

Based on the travel model splits data for Warwick Farm from Transport for NSW (TfNSW) Journey to Work (JTW) datasets, a trip generation rate of 0.29 vehicles per hour per apartment is considered the appropriate rate (rather than 0.15 and 0.21 vehicles per hour). Based on this revised traffic generation rate, the development site would generate a much higher traffic volume which will need to be reflected in an updated traffic impact assessment prior to exhibition of the planning proposal.

 

Impacts on the transport network

 

Due to the additional traffic generation associated with residential and retail uses at the site (including a supermarket), the RMS has previously expressed concerns regarding the potential impacts of the development on the traffic control signals at the intersection of the Hume Highway and Governor Macquarie Drive due to queue spill back from the right turn bay on the Governor Macquarie Drive and Munday Street intersection. The right turn bay at the intersection of Governor Macquarie Drive and Munday Street was also designed to accommodate Masters (a bulky goods facility).

 

In order to fully assess and therefore mitigate the impacts of the proposal on the road network, intersection layouts will need to be reviewed based on the updated traffic generation potential of the site and will need to be reflected in an updated traffic impact assessment prior to exhibition of the planning proposal.

 

Proposed Access Arrangements

 

The access arrangement consists of a loop road off Munday Street, opposite Bull and Stroud Streets.

 

Regarding the proposed access ways, a Sidra Traffic Modelling Analysis is required to address the post-development ‘Level of Service’ in terms of queue lengths, delays, storage bays and traffic management in terms of turning movements at the proposed access off Munday Street. Proposed intersection treatments for the access ways with Munday Street also needs to be provided prior to exhibition of the planning proposal.

 

The proposed basement parking and access will be via a new four-way intersection, replacing the existing T-junction of Munday Street and Bull Street. It is recommended that the proposal be modified so that this access accommodates indented on-street parking spaces and service vehicles. This can be addressed in the preparation of a site specific DCP. 

 

 

 

 

Bicycle and pedestrian facilities

 

A 2.5m wide shared path is required along the Governor Macquarie Drive frontage of the development site between Munday Street and the Hume Highway and along Warwick Street between the Hume Highway and Manning Street. Through the preparation of a site specific DCP, appropriate facilities for pedestrian and bicycle access to and from Warwick Farm railway station will be identified.

 

Noise

 

Should the proposal receive the support of Council, any Gateway determination subsequently issued should require the proponent to indicate how they will respond to noise from the Hume Highway and the rail line, and provide a noise mitigation strategy with measures in accordance with EPA Development near rail corridors and busy roads – interim guideline and the requirements of the SEPP Infrastructure (2007).

 

Economic impacts

 

Council’s City Economy department has noted that there is no economic assessment provided for this planning proposal. The planning proposal indicates a potential 5,000m2 of commercial/retail and community space within an overall site of over 20,000m2. In summary, City Economy recommends that an independent economic impact study be provided by the proponent, before any further comment could be made as to the benefits or otherwise of the proposal. 

 

Should Council resolve to support the proposal, and it subsequently receives a Gateway determination, it is recommended that the Gateway determination be conditioned to require the proponent to provide an independent economic impact assessment of the retail, social enterprise and commercial uses proposed and a detailed analysis of likely job creation resulting from this proposal (compared with the current zone) prior to public exhibition.

 

Urban design

 

The assessment report prepared by City Plan noted that:

 

The properties adjoining the site to the west and south are predominantly low-density one to two storey residential dwellings, with a substantial number supporting equine-related activities. The shadow diagrams submitted with the planning proposal will result in significant overshadowing of the properties to the south. Moreover, having regard to Part 3.7 of the Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008, it is unlikely that the adjoining residential properties to the south would receive a minimum of three hours of sunlight between 9am and 5pm on 21 June to at least one living, rumpus room or the like and 50% of the private open space.

 

 

In the absence of any plan or strategy to redevelop this adjoining area at a similar urban form and density, the proposed scale of the proposal is considered to be inappropriate.

 

Any future proposal will need to address SEPP 65 Design Quality of Residential Apartment Development. Detailed testing of the FSR relative to the proposed height and building efficiency should be provided.

 

It is recommended that a site specific Development Control Plan (DCP) be prepared containing site specific controls to address urban design, building massing and addressing potential environmental impacts including overshadowing prior to exhibition of the planning proposal.

 

Conclusion

 

In order to proceed to a Gateway determination a proposal must have both strategic merit and site specific merit. As noted in the report, the proposal in its current form lacks sufficient site merit to proceed. However, should the proposal be amended as recommended, site-specific merit would be established and the proposal could proceed.

 

It is therefore recommended that Council endorse a modified planning proposal that:

 

·    Reduces the proposed floor space ratio to 2:1 (approximately 58,600m2 GFA);

 

·    Reduces the proposed height of buildings to 45m (to enable approximately 500 dwellings);

 

·    Includes a site specific DCP containing controls to address urban design, building massing and addressing potential environmental impacts including overshadowing;

 

·    Provides an Economic Impact Assessment demonstrating the number of jobs likely to be delivered following rezoning compared to the current B5 zone;

 

·    Amends the traffic impact assessment report to increase vehicle generation rates to 0.29 vehicles per apartment per hour and provide detailed intersection layouts, performance analysis and treatments including parking controls based on this higher rate;

 

·    Provides a noise mitigation strategy; and

 

·    Provides an updated VPA offer.


 

Consultation

 

Should the proposal receive a Gateway determination, it will detail the required consultation to be undertaken prior to finalisation of the amendment.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Further develop a commercial centre that accommodates a variety of employment opportunities.

Deliver a high quality local road system including provision and maintenance of infrastructure and management of traffic issues.

Facilitate economic development.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Regulate for a mix of housing types that responds to different population groups such as young families and older people.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Legislative

 Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Planning Proposal (Under separate cover)

2.         Planning Assessment Report (Under separate cover)

3.         Local Planning Panel Advice (Under separate cover)

4.         Community Benefits Analysis (Under separate cover)

5.         Preliminary Flooding Assessment (Under separate cover)

6.         Traffic Report (Under separate cover)

7.         Urban Design Report (Under separate cover)

8.         VPA Offer (Under separate cover)  


99

Ordinary Meeting 31 July 2019

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 05

Results of pilot study for providing on-street parking spaces on narrow streets

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Advocate for, and develop, transport networks to create an accessible city

File Ref

172041.2019

Report By

Charles Wiafe - Service Manager Traffic and Transport

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At its meeting on 27 March 2019, Council resolved:

To bring back to Council a report by July on a suitable pilot area in the Liverpool LGA:

1.    Listing the streets and associated costs where it is practical to reduce the width of traffic islands;

2.    Identifying opportunities to pave portions of the nature strips to permit on-street parking spaces and explore other opportunities such as parking bays; and 

 

3.    Identifying how many car spaces we would get if the initiatives in this resolution was done in each suburb.

 

This report is in response to the above resolution and provides the findings of this pilot study and indicative costs.

 

Liverpool has many residential streets with narrow carriageway widths varying between 5.5m and 7m. This carriageway configuration does not permit on-street parking on both sides while maintaining two way traffic flow. NSW road rule number 197 prohibits parking on footpaths and nature strips.

 

Other Councils and Transport for NSW (RMS) have identified similar concerns. In response, the RMS has prepared a Technical Direction (TTD 2014/004 July 2014) which provides guidelines on arrangements to permit parking spaces on some narrow streets.

 

As part of the pilot study, Bugong Street, Prestons and Christabel Place/Snowden Close, Cecil Hills have been selected due to local residents’ requests to improve parking. The technical guidelines have been used to identify options including paving portions of the nature strips to permit on-street parking spaces.

 

The analysis has identified that for both streets, on-street parking can be improved by paving parts of the existing nature strips. In addition, Bugong Street has existing central median islands which could be removed to provide a wider carriageway to improve on street parking.

 

The estimated cost for the paving option is $12,000 - $23,500 per space depending on pavement materials (i.e. concrete or permeable pavers).

 

Council’s current delivery program (2019/20) has not allocated budget for this project and if Council supports rolling out the pilot to appropriate streets, prioritisation of requests would need to be developed with an associated budget allocation for the 2020/21 financial year.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.       Notes the findings contained in this report, including costs;

 

2.       Requests the CEO develop guidelines for the assessment and prioritisation of requests for additional parking on narrow streets by December 2019, noting the significant cost savings associated with Option 2 compared to Option 1; and

 

3.       Considers an appropriate funding allocation to deliver on-street parking projects when preparing the 2020/21 budget.

 

REPORT

 

At its meeting on 27 March 2019, Council considered a question with notice concerning on-street parking along narrow streets and resolved that a pilot study to permit on-street parking on narrow streets be carried out to identify opportunities to permit on-street parking on narrow streets.

 

The options considered included:

 

·        Narrowing or removal of traffic islands where possible; and

·        Paving portions of nature strips

 

The pilot study identifies the number of additional car parks that could result by implementing the above options. 

 

Background

 

Council has received representations from local residents about the lack of on-street parking along narrow streets in certain areas. This is primarily due to the following reasons:

 

·        Some of the established suburbs in Liverpool have many residential streets with narrow carriageway widths varying between 5.5m and 7m. This carriageway configuration does not permit on-street parking on both sides while maintaining two way traffic flow.

 

·        NSW Road Rule No 197 prohibits parking on footpaths and nature strips.

 

Due to the above concerns, Council resolved to carry out a pilot study to investigate potential opportunities to permit on-street parking on narrow streets. 

 

As part of the pilot study, it has been identified that most narrow streets are predominately in the established suburbs of Prestons, Cecil Hills and West Hoxton. For the pilot study, two streets - Bugong Street, Prestons and Christabel Place/Snowden Close, Cecil Hills have been selected for investigation.

 

RMS has prepared a Technical Direction (TTD 2014/004 July 2014) which provides guidelines on options to permit parking spaces on some narrow streets including the following:

 

·        Restricting parking on one or both sides of the street;

·        Staggering on-street parking in such a way that it provides traffic calming benefits, but still permits easy access for large vehicles, particularly emergency and service vehicles;

·        Provision of off-road parking areas (road related areas) on one or both sides of the street;

·        Installation of a shared zone.

 

Taking into consideration the options outlined in the Technical Direction, the options to permit on-street parking along the two selected streets are as follows: 

 

Street 1 - Bugong Street, Prestons

 

Bugong Street is a two-way local street in Prestons. The road length is approximately 800m with a carriageway width varying between 5.8m and 10m. The 10m wide road section has a 3.4 - 3.5m wide single traffic lane in each direction separated by a 3m wide central median island. The street has 1.2m wide paved footpaths on both sides.

 

Currently there are no parking restrictions along both sides of the street. However, on-street parking restricts traffic to a single lane due to the narrow road width.

 

The following two options have been developed for this street:

 

·    Option 1 – Paving portions of the nature strips. An example of paved nature strips is shown in Figure 1

 Figure 1 – Example of car parking spaces within nature strips

 

·    Option 2 – Widening the road carriageway by removing the existing median islands and installing No Stopping restrictions (either signs or road markings) along some narrow road sections.

 

These two options are shown in Attachment 1 and 2. The number of car parking spaces that can be provided and cost estimates for both options are outlined in Table 1.

 

Figure 2 – Existing traffic island

 

Table 1 – On-street parking options for Bugong Street, Prestons

 

Option

Number of  parking spaces

Indicative cost    ($ per space)

Total Indicative Cost

 

Option 1

Paving nature strip using Asphalt

 

 

21

$12,500

$262,000

Paving nature strip using permeable pavers

 

$15,600

$327,600

Paving nature strip using concrete

 

$23,500

$493,500

Option 2

Removal of the existing median islands

28

$1,100

$30,800

 

*The indicative cost for option 1 does not include potential relocation of services as services are more likely beneath the verge rather than the median island.

 

Example 2 - Christabel Place/Snowden Close, Cecil Hills

 

Christabel Place and Snowden Close are local streets in Cecil Hills, connected to each other by a threshold. The road is approximately 300m long and has carriageway widths varying between 5.4m and 6m.  The street does not have paved footpaths on either side of the street. The street provides direct vehicular access to 28 dwelling houses. All these properties have more than two on-site car parking spaces. 

 

Two options have been developed to permit additional on-street parking spaces:

 

·    Option 1 – Paving portions of the nature strips to permit on-street parking. This option does not provide scope for a dedicated footpath. The paving would include provision for tree planting or options to retain existing trees.

 

·    Option 2 – Installing No Stopping restrictions along one side of the road to enable parking on the other side. This option would have one through traffic lane with opposing traffic needing to give way. For streets carrying low traffic volumes, this arrangement provides for appropriate traffic calming, which is routinely requested by residents in response to speeding concerns.

 

These two options are shown in Attachment 3 and 4.

 

The number of car parking spaces that can be provided and cost estimates for both options are outlined in Table 2.

 

Table 2 – On-street parking options for Christabel Place/Snowden Cl, Cecil Hills

 

Option

Number of parking space

Indicative cost         ($ per space)

Total Indicative cost

Option 1

Paving nature strip using Asphalt

 

 

 

 

 

21

 

 

$12,500

 

$262,000

Paving nature strip using permeable pavers

 

$15,600

$327,600

Paving nature strip using concrete

 

$23,500

$493,500

Option 2

Installation of No Stopping park restrictions

 

20

$50

 

$1,000

 

Conclusion

 

Two pilot streets have been selected to demonstrate possible on-street car parking options.

 

These options include:

 

·    Paving nature strips to provide off-road parking spaces

·    Widening the road carriageway by removing existing median islands and installing No Stopping restrictions (either signs or road markings) along some narrow road sections.

·    Installing No Stopping restrictions along one side of the road to enable parking on the other side.

 

Of the three options discussed above, two clearly represent better value for money. These are widening the road carriageway by removing existing median islands and installing no stopping restrictions along some narrow road sections and installing no stopping restrictions along one side of the road to enable parking on the other side.

 

These options deliver approximately the same number of spaces for significantly less money and should be pursued when developing guidelines for the assessment and prioritisation of requests for additional parking on narrow streets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Deliver and maintain a range of transport related infrastructure such as footpaths, bus shelters and bikeways.

Deliver a high quality local road system including provision and maintenance of infrastructure and management of traffic issues.

Environment

Support the delivery of a range of transport options.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Legislative

RMS Technical Direction (TTD 2014/004 July 2014)

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Bugong Street, Prestons - Option 1

2.         Bugong Street, Prestons - Option 2

3.         Christabel Place, Cecil Hills - Option 1

4.         Christabel Place, Cecil Hills - Option 2  


101

EGROW 05

Results of pilot study for providing on-street parking spaces on narrow streets

Attachment 1

Bugong Street, Prestons - Option 1

 

PDF Creator


101

EGROW 05

Results of pilot study for providing on-street parking spaces on narrow streets

Attachment 2

Bugong Street, Prestons - Option 2

 

PDF Creator


103

EGROW 05

Results of pilot study for providing on-street parking spaces on narrow streets

Attachment 3

Christabel Place, Cecil Hills - Option 1

 

PDF Creator


103

EGROW 05

Results of pilot study for providing on-street parking spaces on narrow streets

Attachment 4

Christabel Place, Cecil Hills - Option 2

 

PDF Creator 


111

Ordinary Meeting 31 July 2019

Chief Executive Officer Report

 

CEO 01

Local Government NSW Conference 2019

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

159689.2019

Report By

George Georgakis - Manager Council and Executive Services

Approved By

Kiersten Fishburn - Chief Executive Officer

 

 

Executive Summary

 

A report was submitted to the 29 May 2019 Council meeting in relation to the Local Government NSW Annual Conference which will be held from Monday 14 to Wednesday 16 October 2019 at The William Inglis Hotel, Warwick Farm.

 

This report addresses the proposed motions to be submitted to the Conference and provides information in relation to voting delegates which Liverpool City Council will be entitled to for voting on motions and voting in the Board election.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.       Endorse its voting delegates for voting on motions (being the Mayor and all Councillors (except Clr Hadid, noting that Clr Hadid already has a vote as he is a Director of the Association)) and determine its voting delegates for voting in the Board election (noting that Council is entitled to 9 voting delegates and Clr Hadid is entitled to a vote as he is a Director of the Association); and

 

2.       Endorse the key issues to be submitted for consideration at the Local Government NSW Annual Conference.

 

REPORT

 

The 2019 Local Government NSW Annual Conference will be held from Monday 14 to Wednesday 16 October 2019 at The William Inglis Hotel, Warwick Farm.

 

The Conference is the main policy making event for the local government sector where issues are debated and motions put forward for consideration by delegates.

 

 

At the May 2019 Council meeting, Council resolved:

 

That:

 

1.   Any Councillors who wish to attend the 2019 Local Government NSW Annual Conference notify the Councillor Support Officer;

 

2.   Council nominates the Mayor and all Councillors except Clr Hadid as their voting delegates for the conference, noting that Clr Hadid already has a vote as he is a Director of the Association. Should a Councillor not be able to attend, then Councillor Hadid to become the 10th voting delegate for the conference; and

 

3.   A further report be submitted to Council dealing with:

a)    Any motions Council may wish to submit to the conference; and

b)    The conference program.

 

This report address the determination of voting delegates and the key issues to be submitted for consideration at the Local Government (NSW (LGNSW) Annual Conference.

 

LGNSW have advised that as 2019 is a Board election year, voting for the LGNSW President and Director positions will also take place at this year’s Conference.

 

LGNSW have advised that Liverpool City Council is entitled to the following:

 

10 voting delegates for voting on motions; and

9 voting delegates for voting in the Board election.

 

Note, in addition to the above, Clr Hadid is entitled to one vote for voting on motions and also one vote for voting on the Board elections.

 

The Mayor and all Councillors have confirmed they will attend the conference.

 

In accordance with the May 2019 Council resolution, the Mayor and all Councillors except Clr Hadid will be Council’s voting delegates for motions (noting that Clr Hadid already has a vote as he is a Director of the Association).

 

As Council is entitled to 9 voting delegates for voting in the Board election, Council will need to resolve who those delegates will be. Clr Hadid will be entitled to a vote as a Board member, which means one Councillor will not have a vote in the Board elections. 

 

Correspondence from LGNSW is attached to this report. The Conference Program is also attached.

 

LGNSW Board have resolved that motions will be included in the Business Paper for the Conference only where they:

 

1.   Are consistent with the objects of the Association (see Rule 4 of the Association’s rules);

2.   Relate to Local Government in NSW and/or across Australia;

3.   Concern or are likely to concern Local Government as a sector;

4.   Seek to advance the Local Government policy agenda of the Association and/or improve governance of the Association;

5.   Have a lawful purpose (a motion does not have a lawful purpose if its implementation would require or encourage non-compliance with prevailing laws);

6.   Are clearly worded and unambiguous in nature; and

7.   Do not express preference for one or several members over one of several other members.

 

Motions are to be submitted to the Association by 19 August 2019.     

 

It is recommended that Council consider submission of the following issues drawn from recent Council resolutions to be considered for inclusion in the Conference Business Paper:

 

1.   Controls for boarding houses (considered by Council at its meeting in August 2018)

 

Details of Issue

 

Council notes that Direction 2 of the Standard Instrument – Principal Local Environmental Plan requires boarding houses to be included as permissible use in a Council’s LEP in the R1 (General Residential), R2 (Low Density Residential), R3 (Medium Density Residential) and R4 (High Density Residential) zones.

 

Councils request that the Standard Instrument Order and Standard Instrument – Principal Local Environmental Plan are revised to allow Councils to decide in which zones boarding houses are permissible with consent, depending on local need and character.

 

Motion

 

That LGNSW call upon the State Government for an amendment to the Standard Instrument (Local Environmental Plans) Order 2006 to allow Council to determine whether boarding houses are a permissible land use in certain residential zones.

 

 

2.   Shopping trolleys  (considered by Council at its meetings in September 2018, December 2018, and March 2019) 

 

Details of Issue

 

Shopping trolleys abandoned in streets, parks and recreational areas including those dumped into creeks and rivers are a major problem for Councils across Australia.

 

Councils request the NSW government review the legislation pertaining to illegally dumped shopping trolleys, in particular the Impounding Act 1993. Under Section 15 of the Impounding Act 1993, Council may impound abandoned shopping trolleys and charge impounding fees to the trolley provider. Council believes that this legislation should be reviewed to adopt a more preventative approach to illegally dumped shopping trolleys.

 

In 2013, Ipswich City Council was able to introduce a new local law requiring supermarkets and retailers to install a shopping trolley wheel lock containment system if their store owns at least 20 trolleys. The same would apply to any retailer that receives two or more infringement notices for illegally dumped trolleys within a 12 month period. Retailers who fail to comply with the Council’s law face fines of up to $5,500. Ipswich City Council’s efforts have been hailed a success with illegally dumped shopping trolleys now a rare sight in Ipswich.  Councils in NSW would like to follow Ipswich City Council’s example and be able to require local retailers to take responsibility for the whereabouts of their shopping trolleys. 

 

Councils request changes be made to the Impounding Act 1993 to give expanded power to Councils in relation to shopping trolleys. Current enforcement powers, under various legislation, are not effective to prevent a proliferation of shopping trolleys on public land, largely because it is only possible to issue a fine to the person that abandons a trolley. This is impractical and near impossible to enforce.

 

Councils are requesting changes be made to enable designated officers to take enforcement action (issue fines) against the owners of shopping trolleys on public land. In almost all cases the owner of the shopping trolley has their brand clearly identified on the trolley.

 

It is considered that such changes would incentivise shopping trolley owners to introduce proven measures and management systems to prevent shopping trolleys leaving their stores.  

 

Eradicating illegal dumped shopping trolleys is a necessary step to ensuring that our residents are proud of where they live. 

 

Motion

 

That LGNSW calls upon the State Government to change the necessary legislation (Impounding Act 1993) to recognise shopping trolleys as property of individual supermarkets and abandoned shopping trolleys to be defined as litter, so that substantial fines payable by the owner of the trolleys could be passed on for any abandoned trolleys.

 

The legislation be reviewed to enable Councils similar powers to that in Queensland so that Councils can more effectively manage abandoned shopping trolleys. 


 

 

3.   Nominating to become a Councillor  (considered by Council at its meeting in November 2018)

 

Details of Issue

 

There are certain criteria one needs to meet in order to be eligible to nominate to be elected as a Councillor in a Local Government area. A person may become a Councillor in a particular area even if they do not live or pay rates in that given area. They may simply be ‘sponsored in’ by a ratepayer making them eligible.

 

Under the Local Government Act 1993 (Act), and in order to be elected to Council, a person must be enrolled to vote in the relevant LGA (s.274(a) of the Act).

 

In order to be enrolled to vote, one must either be:

 

1.   A resident of the ward in question;

2.   A non-resident owner of rateable land in the ward in question; or

3.   An occupier, or ratepaying lessee, of land in the ward.

 

(See s.266(1) of the Act).

 

An “occupier” is defined under the Dictionary to the Act as:

 

occupier includes:

 

(a)  a person having the charge, management or control of premises, and

 

(b)  in the case of a building which is let out in separate occupancies or a lodging house which is let out to lodgers, the person receiving the rent payable by the tenants or lodgers, either on his or her own account or as the agent of another person,

 

and, in the case of a vessel, means the master or other person in charge of the vessel.

 

Further to the above, sections 299 and 300 of the Act set out the process and circumstances under which someone may be added to the non-residential roll as either a non-resident owner, occupier, or ratepaying lessee of a ward.

 

Any change to the constitution of the non-resident roll, or the process for appointing persons to that roll, would require action on the part of the NSW Parliament in relation to the above sections of legislation.

 

 

 

 

 

Motion

 

That LGNSW lobbies the State Government requesting changes to the Local Government Act in order to ensure that a person wishing to nominate for a particular Council area must either be a resident or a ratepayer.

 

4.    Clean air (considered by Council at its meeting in February 2019)

 

Details of Issue

 

In February 2019, ‘Doctors for the Environment’ released a report entitled ‘Clean Air for New South Wales:2018 Update’.

 

The report found that fine and coarse particle air pollution was getting worse across the State. Fine particle air pollution is linked to hear disease, stroke, diabetes, low birth weight for babies, and restricted lung growth in children.

 

Liverpool City Council has written to the relevant State and Federal Minister expressing Council’s concerns about the report’s findings and sought responses to the report’s recommendations, namely:

 

-     Modernising coal power stations to require the capture of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide; 

-     Better pollution checks to remove high air pollution emitting vehicles from our roads;

-     Higher fees for the existing Load Based Licensing system for industry, so that they better reflect the health costs imposed on the community; and

-     Restrictions on the installation and use of wood fired heaters in urban areas.

 

Motion

 

That LGNSW lobbies the State Government requesting changes to legislation that:

 

-     Will ensure that all manufacturing facilities at risk of emitting air pollutions must install air monitoring equipment and procedure to capture data on an hourly basis that is to be available to the Environmental Planning Authority and Councils upon request with statutory limits that are enforceable through stringent fines or possible closure of operation;

 

-     Remove cars that do not comply with current emission regulations with the exception of vintage registered vehicles, in order to take high polluting vehicles off the road; and

 

-     Introduce tax initiatives to encourage the up-take of electric powered vehicles in order to phase out the reliance on fossil fuels.


 

 

5.   Emergency Services Levy (considered by Council at its meeting in May 2019)

 

Details of Issue

 

Each year, the NSW Government collects payments from Councils and insurers to fund emergency services agencies in NSW, with Councils required to pay 11.7 per cent of the budget required by NSW Emergency Services. These charges are embedded in Council rates and insurance premiums. 

 

The NSW Government plans to collect an additional $160 million (in 2019/20) from NSW councils, communities and those paying insurance premiums to provide better workers’ compensation coverage for volunteer and career firefighters who are diagnosed with one of 12 specific work-related cancers.

 

Councils were sent bills with a letter from Revenue NSW in May 2019, saying NSW Council contributions will increase by $19 million in 2019/20. The letter also foreshadowed increases in the following year.

 

The total emergency services levy contribution for Liverpool City Council for the 2019/2020 financial year will be $2,155,621.39. This is an increase of $292,095.51 on last year’s levy, or 16%. This will mean council will need to find additional funds and/or cut planned initiatives or services.

 

Council no doubt supports career and volunteer firefighters in NSW – as it does all emergency services workers and volunteers. Indeed, many council staff and councillors are volunteers.

 

However, the sector was at no point advised that it would be required to cover the cost via significant increases to the emergency services levy, or what this cost would be.

 

It only fair that the NSW Government fund the first 12 months of this extra cost and work with local governments to ensure the implementation of the funding mechanism is fairer into the future.

 

Motion

 

That LGNSW calls upon the State Government to:

 

i.   Fund the initial additional $19million increase to local governments in the first year; and

 

ii.  Work with NSW local governments to redesign the funding mechanism and implementation of the scheme to ensure fairness for Councils and communities into the future. 

 


 

 

considerations

 

Economic

Costs in the order of $1,000 per delegate for registration and meals which has been budgeted for in the 2019/20 budget.

Environment

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.


Social

Raise awareness in the community about the available services and facilities.


Civic Leadership

Act as an environmental leader in the community.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Operate a well developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Actively advocate for federal and state government support, funding and services.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Invitation to attend LGNSW 14 -16 October 2019

2.         Registration Brochure including Program - LGNSW Annual Conference 2019  


119

CEO 01

Local Government NSW Conference 2019

Attachment 1

Invitation to attend LGNSW 14 -16 October 2019

 

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129

CEO 01

Local Government NSW Conference 2019

Attachment 2

Registration Brochure including Program - LGNSW Annual Conference 2019

 

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133

Ordinary Meeting 31 July 2019

Chief Executive Officer Report

 

CEO 02

Annual report to Council by the Internal Ombudsman

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

164323.2019

Report By

David Maguire - Internal Ombudsman

Approved By

Kiersten Fishburn - Chief Executive Officer

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council’s Internal Ombudsman Policy requires that the Internal Ombudsman (IO) submit an annual report to Council. This annual report is set out below.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receive and note this report.

 

REPORT

 

1.        Reporting requirements

 

Clause 4.15.1 of Council’s Internal Ombudsman Policy requires that the IO shall provide “an annual report to Council on the performance of the functions and duties of the IO under this policy. The report to Council shall include a summary of matters dealt with by the IO in the previous 12 months”.

 

2.         The role of the IO

 

The IO acts as Council’s Code of Conduct Complaints Coordinator, Disclosures Coordinator and Privacy Contact Officer, as well as providing advice to the CEO on possible referrals to ICAC under section 11 of the Independent Commission Against Corruption Act 1988.

 

Given an increased workload, as shown by the statistics below, the IO now works on a four day basis for Council (Tuesday to Friday).

 

3.         Review of policies and processes

 

During the past 12 months, Council adopted the following policies submitted to Council by the IO:

 

·    Code of Conduct

·    Code of Conduct Procedures

·    Employee Security and Workplace Surveillance Policy (operational policy)

·    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Policy (operational policy)

 

In terms of Council processes, during the past 12 months, the IO has:

 

·    issued a privacy information statement for users of the Moore Street carpark

·    assisted Council’s Communications Team to draft a press release on the role of the IO,  published in the Liverpool Leader on 18 July 2018

·    reported to Council about annual Code of Conduct statistics on 21 November 2018

·    provided advice on the use of two way radios for Council’s truck fleet

·    revised declaration of interest forms and published them on Council websites

·    reviewed privacy information for Liverpool Listens

·    reviewed the Data and Privacy sections of the Draft NSW Internet of Things Policy

·    been a member of Council’s Data Management Strategy Project team

·    reviewed privacy requirements for the Western Sydney City Sensor Network Project

·    met (together with the CEO and Director City Corporate) the NSW Information and Privacy Commissioners to discuss concerns about privacy issues about DA submissions published on Council’s website

 

4.         Complaints statistics

 

The following table provides a summary of complaints received and dealt with by the IO for the period from 1 January 2019 to 30 June 2019 (the numbers in brackets refer to the previous 12 months):

 

Type of complaint referral

Number referred

Number completed

NSW Ombudsman

8       (7)

 (7)

8

 (6)

Mayor, Councillors, CEO, senior staff

44   (13)

44

(13)

Members of the public

178  (29)

177

(28)

Code  of  Conduct  complaints  or  queries

18      (5)

(12)

16

  (4)

referred for advice or review

 

 

 

Public interest disclosures

8       (4)

1

  (3)

Privacy complaints

3        (2)

(2)

3

  (2)

TOTAL

259   (60)

249    (56)

(56)

 

120 out of the 178 complaints directly submitted by members of the public were made using the IO complaints form on Council’s public website.

 

The total number of complaints dealt with by the IO during the past year was 300% greater than the total number of complaints dealt with during the preceding 12 months, in part due to the accessibility for the public to information about the Internal Ombudsman role in handling complaints and the location and ease of use of a complaints form on Council’s website.

 

However, it is useful to keep in mind that the number of complaints received by Council is relatively small compared with the 106,374 customer requests received by Council’s Customer Experience staff during the past 12 months and the 1,118 constituent requests referred by the Mayor and Councillors during the past 12 months.

 

Following a recommendation by the Internal Ombudsman, so as to reduce escalation of complaints, most Customer Experience and Community Standards staff members have recently completed a Managing Aggressive Behaviours course, provided by an external consultant, to assist Council staff in the management of customers behaving unreasonably.

 

5.      Public interest disclosures (PIDs)

 

The following is a summary for the reporting period July 2018-June 2019 by the IO (as Disclosures Coordinator) submitted to the NSW Ombudsman in accordance with section 6C of the Public Interest Disclosures Act 1994:

 

Number of public officials who made PIDs to Council: 8

For PIDs received, how many were primarily about:

Corrupt conduct: 4

Serious and substantial waste: 0

Maladministration: 4

Government information contravention: 0

Local government pecuniary interest contravention: 0

Number of PIDs received since 1 July 2018: 8

Number of PIDs finalised since 1 July 2018: 1

Allegations of corrupt conduct substantiated: 0

 

During the past 12 months, the IO provided in-house training on internal reporting processes to 17 Council teams. This training will be provided to remaining Council teams throughout the next six months.

 

6.      Advices and recommendations

 

The IO provided 97 advices about handling complaints and improving Council processes to the CEO and other Council staff during the past 12 months.

 

The IO provided 28 advices about privacy issues and requirements to members of Council staff and members of the public during the past 12 months.

 

7.       Ongoing learning and development

 

During the past 12 months, the IO attended:

 

·    three meetings of the NSW GIPA and Privacy Practitioners Network

·    four meetings of the Internal Ombudsman Network

·    two meetings of the NSW Local Government In-House Counsel Network

·    the NSW Government Solicitors Conference in Sydney (one day)

·    a Privacy Management in Practice course (one day)

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009 sections 82-88

Health Records and Information Privacy Act 2002 section 67

Local Government Act 1993 sections 8A(2)(e), 332, 335, 337 and

440AA

Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 sections 33

and 53

Public Interest Disclosures Act 1994 sections 6CA and 6D

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil  


141

Ordinary Meeting 31 July 2019

City Community and Culture Report

 

COM 01

Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Implement access and equity for all members of the community

File Ref

144548.2019

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Tina Sangiuliano - Acting Director City Community and Culture

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council is committed to building strong and resilient communities in the Liverpool Local Government Area (LGA) and to maximising social wellbeing. Council helps achieve these goals by providing financial support through grants and sponsorships to develop leadership skills, increase participation in community activities and address identified social issues.

 

This report presents the funding recommendations for the Corporate Sponsorship Program for Council’s consideration.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council endorses the funding recommendation of $27,500 (GST exclusive) under the Corporate Sponsorship Program for the following projects:

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Friends of India Australia

Ganeshotsava

$10,000

CORE Community Services

The Employment Enabling Expo: Breaking the Barriers to Employment

$6,500

Cancer Council NSW

Stars of Sydney South West

$6,000

Southern Districts Soccer Football Association

Annual Liverpool Knockout Competition (Soccer)

$5,000

 


 

REPORT

 

The Corporate Sponsorship Program received four applications, all of which met the eligibility criteria and are recommended for funding as follows:

 

Applicant

Friends of India Australia

Location

Liverpool

Project

Ganeshotsava

Whitlam Leisure Centre

Friday 6 September: 6pm-9pm;

Saturday 7 September: 8am-8pm; and Sunday 8 September: 8am-4pm.

Amount Requested

$10,000

Description

Objective:

Delivery of a 3 day event celebrating culture and diversity through a unique festival program. Liverpool Council have supported this event for the past 10 years.

Outcomes:

§ Creates a social environment between the local and wider community and international guests;

§ Provides an opportunity for financial benefit for the Liverpool business district; and

§ Promotes community participation and networking amongst various stakeholders, and opportunities for individuals to build cultural awareness.

Benefits

§ 7,000 residents and visitors to Liverpool;

§ 300 local volunteers; and

§ Liverpool business groups, hotels, food venues and shops in the Liverpool CBD.

Assessment

Recommended for Funding - $10,000

The applicant’s event aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 1 Creating Connections and meets the Corporate Sponsorship (Outgoing) Program’s funding benefits and outcomes. The event delivers a community event, implementing access and equity for all members of the community and celebrating diversity.

7.7 Economic benefit:

a)   Delivers significant economic benefit to the Liverpool LGA;

b)   Delivers benefit to tourism, hospitality and retail sectors through the attendance; and

d)   Attracts national or international attention to Liverpool as a place to reside, visit, work and/or invest.

 

 

7.7 Community, cultural, and social benefit:

a)  Provides and promote Liverpool’s cultural diversity and   celebrate our City’s uniqueness; and

b)  Enhances Liverpool’s profile and reputation as an outward looking, creative and connected city.

 

7.7.1    Expected program outcomes:

a)   Provide an opportunity for measurable economic, social, environmental and/or cultural benefits to Council and the Liverpool LGA;

b)   Provide opportunities for the community to participate and contribute in activities/events in the Liverpool LGA;

d)   Provide extensive coverage and promotional/publicity          opportunities across a range of media outlets: and

e) Promote Liverpool’s reputation as a great place to live, visit,   work, and invest.

 

Applicant

CORE Community Services

Location

Miller

Project

Employment Enabling Expo

Miller 2168 Community Hub

Tuesday 15 October: 8am-2pm

 

Amount Requested

$6,500

Description

Objective:

A Mini-Expo to up skill and train individuals for the workplace. The expo will have a key focus on job searching skills, strategies and resume writing. Local business owners and experts will deliver workshops and other interactive tasks to promote employment opportunities.

Outcomes:

§ Provide opportunities to improve and enhance workplace skills and expectations through a range of workshops, relevant to current job opportunities;

§ Provide an opportunity for financial independence to unemployed individuals and boost their self-esteem as future employees; and

§ Provide continuity with local business owners and the community and develop strong partnerships with all relevant stakeholders. 

Benefits

§ 100 unemployed residents; and

§ Local business owners seeking staff.

Assessment

Recommended for Funding - $6,500

The applicant’s event aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 1 Creating Connections and meets the Corporate Sponsorship (Outgoing) Program’s funding benefits and outcomes. The event delivers a community event, implementing access and equity for all members of the community and celebrating diversity.

7.7 Economic benefit:

a) Delivers significant economic benefit to the Liverpool LGA;

c) Provides a platform for research, trade, and/or investment    opportunities; and

e) Creates employment opportunities within the Liverpool LGA.

 

7.7 Community, cultural, and social benefit:

a) Provides and promote Liverpool’s cultural diversity and celebrate our City’s uniqueness; and

c) Creates opportunities for education and information exchange between Council, the community and the sector.

 

7.7.1 Expected program outcomes:

b) Provide opportunities for the community to participate and contribute in activities/events in the Liverpool LGA.

 

 

Applicant

Cancer Council NSW

Location

Warwick Farm

Project

Stars of Sydney South West

Warwick Farm Holiday Inn

Saturday 10 August: 6:30-11:30pm

Amount Requested

$6,000

Description

Objective:

A Gala event bringing together cancer survivors and their families to promote hope for a cancer free future. Participants who have undergone extensive treatment and cancer care will be encouraged to participate on the night, where families will come together in a supportive program.

Outcomes:

§ Creates connectedness between cancer survivors and their families in a positive and engaging environment;

§ Provides opportunities to discuss and critically analyse systemic issues that affect residents, and create a forum of discussion on matters;

§ Allow individuals from a range of cultural backgrounds to share and discuss their own experiences and build relationships with community members; and

§ Promotes a supportive and strong community in the fight against cancer.

Benefits

§ 600 attendees

§ Residents from Liverpool LGA who have survived cancer

Assessment

Recommended for Funding - $6,000

The applicant’s event aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 1 Creating Connections and meets the Corporate Sponsorship (Outgoing) Program’s funding benefits and outcomes. The event delivers a community event, implementing access and equity for all members of the community and celebrating diversity.

7.7 Community, cultural, and social benefit:

a) Provides and promote Liverpool’s cultural diversity and celebrate our City’s uniqueness;

c) Creates opportunities for education and information exchange between Council, the community and the sector; and

d) To support the organisation and activation of a charity event with the Liverpool LGA. Sponsorship funds are not to be used for direct fundraising, including but not limited to the purchase of tickets or tables at a fundraising event.

 

7.7.1 Expected program outcomes:

b) Provide opportunities for the community to participate and contribute in activities/events in the Liverpool LGA; and

e) Provide extensive coverage and promotional/publicity opportunities across a range of media outlets.

 

Applicant

Southern Districts Soccer Football Association Inc.

Location

Liverpool

Project

Liverpool Knockout Competition

Ernie Smith Reserve

Saturday 31 August: 8:30am-5:30pm

Sunday 1 September: 8:30am-4:30pm

Amount Requested

$10,000

Description

Objective:

The Liverpool Knockout Competition is the finals of the soccer knockout tournament for football teams registered with Southern Districts. Soccer is embraced by many ethnic and community groups that make up the diverse population of Liverpool.

 

Outcomes:

§ The event attracts teams from the Southern District area to participate in the champions knockout activity;

§ Promotes Liverpool as a strong and skillful football base in the wider Australian community; and

§ Strengthens community pride, encourages community participation and promotes healthy lifestyles.

Benefits

§ 34 Southern District Soccer clubs; and

§ 1,000 attendees over the two-day event.

Assessment

Recommended for Funding $5,000 (reduced amount)

The recommended amount is less than requested as:

·    The funding requested is for the purchase of trophies and medallions for participants. The requested amount of $10,000 is considered excessive for this purpose and does not represent value for money to Council; and

·    Limited branding opportunities for Council were presented by this event. Based on the previous year’s sponsorship acquittal information, Council was not offered an opportunity to display signage at the event, and was not acknowledged as a sponsor on any advertising or promotional materials.

The project is aligned with Council’s Community Strategic Plan Direction 1 Creating Connection by delivering a community event promoting access and equity for all members of the community.

7.7 Community, cultural, and social benefit:

a) Provides and promotes Liverpool’s cultural diversity and celebrates our City’s uniqueness.

 

7.7.1 Expected program outcomes:

a) Provide an opportunity for measurable economic, social, environmental and/or cultural benefits to Council and the Liverpool LGA;

b) Provide opportunities for the community to participate and contribute in activities/events in the Liverpool LGA; and

e) Promote Liverpool’s reputation as a great place to live, visit, work, and invest.

 

6.2.6 Assessment and Recommendation - Council will consider the criteria of value for money, the number of individuals participating in or benefiting from the project, and the organisation’s capacity to deliver the project.

 


 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$100,000

$100,000

$27,500

$72,500

COMMUNITY GRANTS

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$102,000

$102,000

Nil

$102,000

MATCHING GRANTS

Budget

Current balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$200,000

$200,000

Nil

$200,000

SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT GRANTS*

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$75,000

$75,000

Nil

$75,000

COMBINED FUNDING BALANCE

Combined Budget

Combined Balance

Total recommended funding

Remaining

$477,000

$477,000

$27,500

$449,500

* Sustainable Environment Grants funding is via a rate levy and is only eligible to be used for the Sustainable Environment Grants Program.

Environment

There are no environmental considerations.

Social

Support community organisations and groups to deliver services.

Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Local Government Act 1993 - s356.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Grants, Donations, and Corporate Sponsorship Policy (Under separate cover)  


159

Ordinary Meeting 31 July 2019

City Community and Culture Report

 

COM 02

Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage 2

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Implement access and equity for all members of the community

File Ref

165200.2019

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Tina Sangiuliano - Acting Director City Community and Culture

 

 

 Executive Summary

 

This report responds to a Council resolution to look at suitable land use of the site known as Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage 2. 

At its meeting on 21 November 2018, Council resolved to:

1.   Investigate a suitable use for the purchased land in consultation with the community; and

2.   Report back to Council.

A functional brief was developed in November 2010 for the precinct of Carnes Hill which outlined a vision for a vibrant and attractive community and recreation precinct and proposed the following facilities for the site:

·    District library;

·    Multi-purpose community centre;

·    Indoor recreation centre;

·    Skate park;

·    Key suburb park;

·    District sportsground; and

·    Natural area.

The site identified in the functional brief of 2010, offers over 15 hectares of open space divided into a northern and a southern parcel by Beard Creek. Stage One of the precinct on the southern parcel was delivered in 2016, and includes a library, multi-purpose community centre, indoor recreation centre, skate park, café, outdoor play area and a public plaza. 

 

In preparation of this report, Council conducted community consultation, reviewed relevant planning and recreation strategic documents, conducted a site analysis and reviewed existing recreation infrastructure around Carnes Hill.

This report presents two options for Council’s consideration, and makes recommendation to endorse an option to be further investigated through a master planning process.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Receives and notes this report; and

2.   Endorse an option to be further investigated through a masterplanning process.

 

 

REPORT

1.   Background

A functional brief was developed in November 2010 for the precinct of Carnes Hill which outlined a vision for a vibrant and attractive community and recreation precinct. The site offers over 15 hectares of open space divided into a northern and southern parcel by Beard Creek.  Stage One of the precinct on the southern parcel was delivered in 2016, and includes a library, multi-purpose community centre, indoor recreation centre, skate park, café, outdoor play area and a public plaza. 

In relation to Stage Two of the precinct on the northern parcel, at its meeting on 21 November 2018, Council resolved to:

1.   Investigate a suitable use for the purchased land in consultation with the community; and

2.   Report back to Council.

This report is prepared in response to the Council resolution and makes recommendations on the suitable use of the land based on community needs. The report takes into consideration the relevant strategies, reports, community consultation feedback, site feasibility and analysis. It presents two potential land use outcomes and makes the recommendation that Council endorse an option to be further investigated through a master planning process. 

 

 

 

2.   Analysis of relevant strategies and reports

a)   Recreation, Open Space and Sports Strategy (ROSS Strategy)

Adopted in 2018, the ROSS Strategy is a principal document directing and guiding the planning and development of Public Recreation (RE1) land. This includes planning for the current and future needs of recreation, open space and sporting needs in Liverpool Local Government Area (LGA). The document provides guidance on the delivery of high quality, integrated and multi-functional, recreation, open space and sporting infrastructure. The Strategy recognises the undersupply of active and passive recreation facilities across the LGA and specifically in the new release suburbs of Austral, Carnes Hill, Edmondson Park and Middleton Grange. The planning and delivery of district and local sporting venues in new release areas, along with the planning for multi-use sporting venues integrated with community facility infrastructure is identified as a key action in the ROSS Strategy’s action plan.

The ROSS Strategy also cites the benchmarks for sporting facilities in reference to the projected population numbers. The planning of sporting and recreational facilities in Carnes Hill Precinct Stage Two will address the unmet demand for sporting and recreational facilities in Carnes Hill and the neighbouring suburbs of West Hoxton, Horningsea Park, Hoxton Park and the western side of Prestons. The development of the precinct into a sporting and recreation precinct will be aligned with the strategic direction of ROSS Strategy. The South West District growth area has an identified shortfall of gymnastics and learn to swim facilities. The shortfall is identified in the established South West District areas and with the anticipated growth along strategic corridors, the identified gap will potentially increase the pressure on existing facilities.

The ROSS Strategy identifies the vital role of open space in supporting health, wellbeing, biodiversity and ecosystem services by providing tree canopy, increased amenity, whilst protecting and enhancing our natural areas. It is crucial to provide passive recreational parks coupled with organised recreation for climate resilience and sustainability. The planning of Stage Two has to respond to a sustainable land use with a balanced mix of active and passive recreation and minimum environmental impacts.

b)    Draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy

The draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy informs planning and provision of aquatic and leisure facilities within the Liverpool Local Government Area (LGA) over the next 10 years. The Strategy identifies approximately 70% users of the Michael Clarke Recreation Centre live within a three kilometre radius and approximately 94% within a six kilometre radius. The primary and secondary catchment of Carnes Hill extends to the suburbs of Cecil Hills to the north, Casula to the east, Denham Court and Bardia (Campbelltown LGA) to the south and Austral to the west.

     Fig 1.1: Primary and secondary catchment of Carnes Hill

The technical assessment report outlined in the Strategy identifies demand for aquatic facilities at Carnes Hill Precinct, however, also noted the following:

·    The Michael Clarke Recreation Centre has site constraints and space limitations in the current setting for any further development; and

·    Makes reference to a potential private aquatic facility in Prestons (within a 3km catchment radius of Carnes Hill).

Council is aware of a Development Application (DA) that has been lodged for a potential private sport facility in Prestons, which proposes a 25m heated lap swimming pool, learn to swim program, gymnasium, and indoor sports facilities. This facility will address some demand for aquatic facilities, however, the demand figures identified in the draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy indicate that this facility will not relieve the identified existing gap in aquatic facilities and recreational water play in the western area of the Liverpool LGA.  Further, due to private ownership and operation, the need for affordable and accessible facilities by all community groups will remain an unmet need.


 

The aquatic and leisure centres around Carnes Hill currently servicing demand with distances from Carnes Hill are:

·    Michael Wenden Aquatic Leisure Centre at 5km (Liverpool LGA);

·    Macquarie Fields Leisure Centre at 12.5km (Campbelltown LGA);

·    Ignite Health and Fitness at 8km (Fairfield LGA); and

·    Prairiewood Leisure Centre (Aquatopia) at 11km (Fairfield LGA).

Michael Wenden is the closest aquatic centre/aquatic facility to Carnes Hill, where the indoor pool is over-subscribed and the outdoor pool is seasonal. The identified gap in distribution of aquatic facilities servicing the developing areas of west of the Liverpool LGA will likely increase the pressure on Michael Wenden to accommodate additional users from Carnes Hill and neighbouring suburbs. This centre is earmarked for renewal due to its current conditions and limited options to meet the changing needs of communities.

The draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy identifies the opportunity to provide a splash park and learn to swim facilities or explore small scale aquatic components at Carnes Hill to meet the local demand.

Other considerations:

A water play area is proposed at Stante Reserve, Middleton Grange (within a 3km catchment radius of Carnes Hill). The construction of facilities at Stante Reserve is scheduled for completion by mid-2020. The Edmondson Park Town Centre Park will also likely include a water play area. These facilities are to be considered while planning for water play in the surrounding suburbs.

c)    Council report on access to water play facilities in hot weather

At 27 February 2019 Council meeting, a report was presented to Council with initial investigations on the provision of water parks and water play features across the LGA. This report outlined the benefits and constraints of “zero water depth” design, accessibility and social interaction; construction and ongoing cost; and a snapshot of the maintenance and operation model. The report outlined the existing deficit and demand for provision of water play and cooling facilities across the LGA.

The provision of aquatic facilities and/or water play feature at Carnes Hill Precinct Stage Two will respond to the ROSS Strategy’s direction towards increasing the number of water structures and Council’s desire to increase public access to water play facilities in hot weather.


 

 

d)   Carnes Hill Recreation and Community Precinct Functional Brief (2010)

The Recreation and Community Precinct Functional Brief for Carnes Hill developed in November 2010 describes the key elements and design principles for the proposed precinct. This document identifies a Recreation and Community Precinct Model for Carnes Hill (Stage One and Two), inclusive of the following facilities:

·    District library;

·    Multi-purpose community centre;

·    Indoor recreation centre;

·    Skate park;

·    Key suburb park;

·    District sportsground; and

·    Natural area.

The functional brief further outlines the detailed functions of the key suburb park (district park) and district sportsground facility. The district library, multi-purpose community centre, indoor recreation centre and a skate park have been delivered as part of Stage One of the Precinct.

3.   Community consultation

Following the Council resolution in November 2018, a community consultation plan was implemented which included an online survey, face to face survey and feedback provided by community members at various programs and activities delivered at the Carnes Hill Precinct. The primary aim of the consultation was to understand the current limitations at the Precinct that could be taken into consideration in stage two of the Precinct, and the community’s needs and aspirations for the new precinct. The online survey on Liverpool Listens was live from 24 January to 24 March 2019, and face to face consultations were undertaken at the National Skate Competition event and school holiday programs in January 2019 at the Carnes Hill Precinct. A total of 72 surveys were completed.

The survey questions were segregated into two sections. The first section focused on understanding the utility of current facilities in Stage One. The top five concerns raised by the community regarding existing facilities at Carnes Hill in descending order are:

1.   Limited car parking;

2.   Accessibility and connectivity of toilets to the internal and external spaces of the precinct;

3.   Insufficient green open space and connected walking / jogging tracks;

4.   Limitations to access indoor courts for casual use; and

5.   Splash park size limiting the user age group to toddlers and young kids.

Fig 1.2: Analysis of current facilities at Carnes Hill

In response to the identified concerns about existing facilities in Stage One, the planning of Stage Two will be required to address the following:

·    Accommodate parking needs of the new precinct, as well as to absorb the overflow from Michael Clarke Recreation Centre;

·    Increased tree canopy cover and provide for improved high quality green open space with walking/jogging tracks with connections to Stage One;

·    Account for accessibility and connectivity across all proposed activities and functions; and

·    Allow for flexible use of courts.

The second section of the survey was intended to understand the future need and demand for recreation facilities. The top five recreation facilities identified by the community in descending order are:

1.   Swimming pool or aquatic facilities with therapy and program pools;

2.   Water play or splash park;

3.   Outdoor soccer fields;

4.   Outdoor basketball courts; and

5.   Sheltered children’s play area serving broader age group, followed by a cricket oval.

Fig 1.3: Future demand of recreation facilities in Carnes Hill

Considering the results of the community consultation and to respond to the identified demand, the facilities for Stage Two will likely include aquatic facilities and sporting fields.

4.   Site analysis

Fig 1.4: Location of Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage Two

The site holds an approximate area of 79,397 sq.m (7.93ha) and is located to the North of Michael Clarke Recreation Centre, bounded by Cowpasture Rd in the North-West, Beard Creek in South and South-East and Pacific Palms Circuit in North-East.

A high-tension overhead powerline runs diagonally (south-east to north-west) through the site, dividing the site into two parts. The powerline easement is considered to be approximately 30-45 metres in width, subject to site conditions and electricity infrastructure. It is required that sedentary activities are avoided within the overhead powerline easement. The permitted activities within the electrical easement must not obstruct access to service vehicles. Activities are subject to height limitations of 4.6m if not climbable and 2.5m if climbable. Vegetation inclusive of trees, shrubs and plants must not exceed 4m in height.

The position of a powerline within the site significantly limits the built form setting and distribution of activities and functions across the land parcel.

The site falls within low-medium flood plain zone of Cabramatta Creek’s tributary. A detailed flood plain investigation is required to comprehend the potential impacts on the utility of the site for recreational use.

The planning of functions in Stage Two should complement the existing functions in Stage One. The current utility of existing facilities and evolving maintenance and operational issues should be considered during the initial investigation phase of planning.

 

Fig 1.5: Surrounding community infrastructure


 

The current recreation and sporting facilities around Carnes Hill include:

·    Greenway Park: 2 x AFL ovals with turf cricket pitches, Greenway Park Community Centre and a small shaded children’s play area; and

·    Brownes Farm Reserve: 1 x shared cricket oval/ football field, 1 x soccer field, amenity block, exercise equipment and 2 x small children’s play area.

 

The sporting fields at Greenway Park serve the immediate 400m catchment and the suburb of West Hoxton. Cowpasture Rd is a major access barrier for Carnes Hill and neighbouring suburbs. On the other hand, Brownes Farm Reserve sporting fields on its own cannot address the demand for active recreation in the current setting. Provision of multi-use sporting fields at Carnes Hill will address the recognised demand for soccer and other active recreation in Carnes Hill, Horningsea Park, Hoxton Park and Prestons, along with the reinforcement of the green grid network.

The provision of recreational facilities will benefit the surrounding schools which are:

·    Hoxton Park Public School (within 400m catchment);

·    Holy Spirit Catholic Primary School (within 800m catchment);

·    Greenway Park Public School (within 1200m catchment); and

·    Malek Fahd Islamic School (within 1200m catchment).

With consideration of the ongoing discussions with the Department of Education, the joint use of the proposed sporting and aquatic facilities at Carnes Hill Precinct Stage Two with schools within 800m catchment should be investigated further.


 

5.   Feasibility of proposed options

With the overall consideration of relevant Council strategies, reports and investigation studies; community consultation feedback and site analysis, this report identifies two options with diverse functionality which are responding to existing and future demand and needs for recreational facilities at Carnes Hill. These options have been broadly tested against the financial sustainability criteria later in this report. A detailed master planning process is required to determine the most feasible and sustainable option that will meet the community needs.

Option

Proposed activities and functions for investigation

Option 1

·    Indoor program pool with learn to swim;

·    25m indoor/outdoor lap swimming pool;

·    Water play splash park;

·    Gymnastics;

·    2 x multi-use sporting fields; and

·    2 x multi-use outdoor basketball courts.

Option 2

·    Indoor program pool with learn to swim;

·    25m indoor/outdoor lap swimming pool;

·    Water play splash park;

·    Gymnastics; and

·    Potential future expansion of aquatic facilities.

 


 

Option 1:

Option 2:

 

5.1 Financial, social and environmental impacts

The proposed options represent two possible approaches to addressing the community’s need for additional recreation pursuits.

 

The options presented have been considered against the following criteria:

·    Financial – the capability of the venues to operate with minimum ongoing operating subsidy from Council;

·    Social – the capability of the venue to meet the demand gaps identified in Figure 1.3 (above), the ROSS and the draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy;

·    Environmental – the capability of the proposed option to operate with limited impact on the local environment.

The following table outlines the financial, social and environmental impact of the proposed models.

Rating

Definition

1

Negative impact with significant drawbacks

2

Negative impact with some drawbacks

3

Neutral

4

Positive impact with some benefits

5

Positive impact with significant benefits

 

OPTION

DESCRIPTION

IMPACT

FINANCIAL

SOCIAL

ENVIRONMENTAL

Option 1

2 x Sporting fields (multi- use), 2 x Outdoor Basketball courts (multi- use), indoor program pool inclusive of learn to swim, indoor/ outdoor 25m lap swimming pool, children’s play area, water play/ splash park, gymnastics and parking

Rating 5

Positive financial returns following an initial establishment period.  The model can operate self-sufficiently and without reliance on continuous subsidies from Council.  Revenues generated from Learn-to-swim and gymnastics will support loss leading activities such as lap swimming.

Rating 5

Estimated attendances will exceed 370,000 annual attendances across a range of age demographics.  This model will allow for learn to swim, lap swimming, recreation swimming, hydrotherapy and non-immersive water-based play including waterslides

Rating 2

 

This option will have substantial consumption of electricity, gas and water.  Facility design should consider the use of quad/tri-generation to minimise the venues carbon footprint.  The combination of facilities will consume approximately 60 kilolitres of water per day.

 

Option 2

Indoor program pool inclusive of learn to swim, indoor/outdoor 25m lap swimming pool, children’s play area integrated with water play/ splash park and parking.

Rating 4

Positive financial returns following an initial establishment period.  The model can operate self-sufficiently and without reliance on continuous subsidies from Council.  Revenues generated from Learn-to-swim and gymnastics. Loss of active recreation activities.

Rating 2

Estimated attendances will be focused on aquatics only. Absence of sporting facilities will increase the current and future unmet demand for sporting. 

Rating 2

This option will have substantial consumption of electricity, gas and water. Increased stress on management and residue land (outside the built envelope footprint). Facility design should consider the use of quad/tri-generation to minimise the venues carbon footprint.  The combination of facilities will consume approximately 60 kilolitres of water per day

 

Below is the summary of the positive and negative outcomes of the proposed options.

PROS

CONS

Option 1

·   Responds to the strategic directions of the ROSS Strategy and addresses the identified existing shortfall the sporting facilities.

·   The proposed mix of land use and functions creates a balanced mix of outdoor sports recreation and aquatic recreation.

·   The proposed recreation precinct will be district level facility as recognised by the ROSS Strategy.

·   Responds to the functional brief prepared in 2010 for the Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct.

·   Responds and addresses the community needs identified in the community consultation.

·   Provides the maximum recreational value for the portion of land south of the powerline easement.

·   Aligns with the draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy’s direction and will respond to the identified local demand for aquatic facilities in Carnes Hill and neighbouring suburbs.

·   The proposed option will complement the future regional aquatic and leisure centre in Austral, which is planned to serve the users from Liverpool LGA, Campbelltown LGA and Camden LGA.

·   The proposed option aligns with the Department of Planning’s vision for Leppington Town Centre along with its alignment to the hierarchy of aquatic and leisure centres by proposing a district level facility at Carnes Hill.

·   Some capacity for expansion to absorb future aquatic trends.

·   The option proposes highest mix of functions, where the building footprint can likely increase construction cost.

·   Potential impact of high energy consumption (electricity, gas and water), however, can be controlled through sustainable building solutions for zero to minimum emissions.

 

 

 

Option 2

·   Provides a site with the opportunity for the provision of district level aquatic facilities including 50m pool and expanded recreational aquatics. 

·   Creates the potential for spacing of 50m pool provision within the LGA (for example: Holsworthy 25m pool, Whitlam 50m pool, Wenden 25m pool and Carnes Hill 50m pool).   

·   Aligns with the draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy’s direction to respond to the identified local demand for aquatic facilities in Carnes Hill and neighbouring suburbs.

·   Enables overflow parking for the existing Carnes Hill South precinct to be considered between the creek and high- tension powerlines.

·   Maximum capacity for future expansion to absorb future aquatic trends.

 

·   Carnes Hill is classified as a local town centre and lacks infrastructure (i.e. public transport, access and connectivity, road capacity to manage high volumes of traffic) to accommodate and facilitate a regional level aquatic facility.

·   Does not respond to the strategic directions of the ROSS Strategy and increases the current and future deficit in sporting facilities.

·   The proposed aquatic facility will offer access to aquatic facilities only, which contradicts the directions of the ROSS Strategy to provide access to integrated multi-functional recreational facilities.

·   The proposed option does not align with the Department of Planning’s vision for Leppington Town Centre (Strategic Town Centre) along with its alignment to the hierarchy of aquatic and leisure centres and potentially will impact on access to the government’s infrastructure delivery funding.

·   The proposed option does not complement the future regional aquatic and leisure centre in Austral, but rather disregards the proposition.

·   Responds only to aquatic and some leisure facility demand, and not to expressed needs identified in the community consultation, including that for sporting facilities.

·   The proposed option increases the gap in the provision of open space and sporting facilities.

·   Does not respond to the functional brief prepared in 2010 for Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct.

·   The proposed option does not fully utilise the recreational land available on this site resulting in increased stress on land management with lower active recreational value.

 

Other considerations for Option 1:

The proposed mix of recreation facilities in Option 1 will relieve the potential pressure on Michael Wenden. Michael Wenden Aquatic Leisure Centre is earmarked for an upgrade and will likely absorb the potential increased future demand of aquatic facilities beyond Carnes Hill.

The regional classification of Austral’s aquatic and leisure centre will facilitate the opportunity of getting funding and grants from Federal, State department, Camden Council and Campbelltown City Council. The Leppington Town Centre is proposed to be a strategic town centre, which will attract housing and employment. The housing demand from the Leppington Town Centre will likely be absorbed by the new release areas of Austral, Edmondson Park and Rossmore Grange. The location of a regional aquatic and leisure centre in Austral will address the future demand of the new release areas of Liverpool and the identified gap in the western area of Liverpool LGA.

Other considerations for Option 2:

The proposd mix of aquatic facilities in Option 2 responds to the local demand as identified in the draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy and will likely absorb the future demand of aquatic recreation for neighbouring suburbs. The proposed mix will relieve the existing pressure on Michael Wenden Aquatic Leisure Centre, however the future expansion into an exclusive aquatic centre will extend the existing pressure on the demand and provision of active outdoor recreation.

Each of the options relies on surplus generating programs such as learn-to-swim to offset the operating costs associated with typical loss-leading aquatic centre operations such as heating, utility and staffing costs.

Council should note that the financial modelling does not consider ongoing asset deterioration and replacement. Both options include the provision of water play activities that conceptually will include splash park fixtures and waterslides that will require a statutory level of inspection and maintenance that cannot be determined until the facility mix is defines.

 

5.2 Unmet demand

The draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy identifies the potential demand gap of up to 500,000 annual attendances to aquatic activities in Carnes Hill.

An appropriate mix of program and play space that includes swimming, hydrotherapy and water play space will offer multi-generational options to the community and assist in meeting the clear supply gaps that are defined on Map 1 of the draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy.

Currently there are no suppliers within the commercial market that deliver the mix of programs highlighted in each of the options above, within the Carnes Hill Precinct catchment.

5.3 Staging and funding options

With the recommended investigation of the proposed options, the preferred option should be explored through a comprehensive master planning process of the site. The master planning process will test and validate the feasibility and financial sustainability of the proposed functions.

The construction of facilities at Carnes Hill Precinct Stage Two is likely to be delivered in stages, depending on the availability of the funding resources. One potential funding source is the Greater Sydney Sports Facility Fund that provides grants between $500,000.00 and $5 million, where the awarded funds are required to be spent within three years of approval. Other funding options to be explored include other state and federal government grants, developer contributions or Voluntary Planning Agreement (VPA).

Currently, there are no funds identified for Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage Two in the current and next financial year.

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Enhance the environmental performance of buildings and homes.

Facilitate economic development.

Environment

Enhance the environmental performance of buildings and homes.

Protect, enhance and maintain areas of endangered ecological communities and high quality bushland as part of an attractive mix of land uses.

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.


Social

Raise awareness in the community about the available services and facilities.

Support access and services for people with a disability.

Deliver high-quality services for children and their families.


Civic Leadership

Act as an environmental leader in the community.

Undertake communication practices with the community and stakeholders across a range of media.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision-making processes.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

 

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


165

Ordinary Meeting 31 July 2019

City Community and Culture Report

 

COM 03

Draft Liverpool Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Meet the challenges of Liverpool’s growing population

File Ref

169430.2019

Report By

Mark Westley - Manager Recreation and Community Outcomes

Approved By

Tina Sangiuliano - Acting Director City Community and Culture

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council’s aquatic and leisure centres provide accessible and affordable facilities for a range of activities that benefit the Liverpool community. Council currently provides four aquatic and indoor leisure centres: Whitlam Leisure Centre (Whitlam), Michael Wenden Aquatic Leisure Centre (Wenden), Michael Clarke Recreation Centre – leisure only (Clarke), and Holsworthy Aquatic Centre (Holsworthy). Council also provides a splash park at Bigge Park in Liverpool and smaller water play features in Macquarie Mall and Carnes Hill.

 

While the existing centres are highly utilised, they are ageing facilities and require major revitalisation. These centres alone will not be able to meet the projected ongoing demand from Liverpool’s rapidly growing population, particularly in our western areas.

 

To date, there is no strategic document that provides guidance to Council regarding the planning, delivery and operation of aquatic and leisure centres. The Liverpool Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy aims to direct the planning and provision of aquatic and leisure facilities within the Liverpool Local Government Area (LGA) over the next ten years.

 

Council engaged the consultancy services of @Leisure Planners to produce a report on the current and future provision of aquatic and leisure centres within the Liverpool Local Government Area (LGA). Extensive research was undertaken to understand the aquatic and leisure needs, expectations and demand of the community, identify capacity through a technical review of existing infrastructure and provide recommendations on the provision and management of future aquatic and leisure centres.

 

The draft report identifies:

1.   Council’s role and function in the provision of aquatic and leisure facilities;

2.   The aquatic and leisure needs, expectations and the current and future demands of the community;

3.   A technical review of existing infrastructure and proposed future facility requirements; and

4.   Recommendations on the provision and management of future aquatic and leisure centres across the LGA particularly within growth areas.

 

The Strategy will assist Council to plan for the future aquatic and leisure needs of the Liverpool community.

 

This report is presented to Council for endorsement of the draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy to be placed on public exhibition. The draft strategy is attached under separate cover to this report.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Endorses the draft Liverpool Aquatic and Leisure Centre Strategy to be placed on public exhibition; and

 

2.   Receive a report at the completion of the public exhibition period noting feedback received and any changes made to the draft Strategy in line with community feedback, or if no submissions are received, delegate authority to the CEO to endorse the draft Liverpool Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy.

 

REPORT

 

Background

Local government remains the main provider of recreational facilities to the community. Council’s primary mandate for this provision is threefold:

·    The legislated responsibilities under the Local Government Act (1993) and Crown Lands Act (1989) to manage public land for the benefit of the community;

·    A long-held expectation from our community that Council manages and delivers public space to meet the many recreational pursuits of the community; and

·    Provision and management of land assets, programs and services are often not financially viable for the private sector.

 

Aquatic and indoor leisure centres are an important contributor to the community’s well-being and the liveability within Liverpool. Council currently provides four aquatic and indoor leisure centres: Whitlam Leisure Centre (Whitlam), Michael Wenden Aquatic Leisure Centre (Wenden), Michael Clarke Recreation Centre – leisure only (Clarke), and Holsworthy Aquatic Centre (Holsworthy). Council also provides a splash park at Bigge Park in Liverpool and smaller water play features in Macquarie Mall and Carnes Hill.

 

Liverpool is one of the fastest growing LGAs in Australia with the population doubling in just 20 years. Population projections estimate that the residential population of Liverpool LGA will reach 331,000 by 2036 – a 60% increase on current population levels. To manage this population increase and provide high quality services to the community, Council is committed to continually improving aquatic and leisure service provision to the community. 

 

To meet the community’s demand for aquatic and leisure facilities, there was a need for a strategic document to provide guidance to Council regarding the planning, delivery and operation of aquatic and leisure centres. An aquatic and leisure-specific strategy would serve this purpose and would also complement the strategic directions within the Recreation, Open Space and Sports Strategy, which provides guidance on recreation service provision more broadly. 

 

Council engaged the consultancy services of @Leisure Planners to produce a report on the current and future provision of aquatic and leisure centres within the Liverpool LGA.

 

Development of the Strategy

Extensive research was undertaken to understand the aquatic and leisure needs, expectations and demand of the community, identify capacity through a technical review of existing infrastructure and provide recommendations on the provision and management of future aquatic and leisure centres.

 

The scope of this research included:

·    Interviews with centre management, existing user groups, schools in Liverpool, and adjacent Councils;

·    Workshops with staff and Councillors;

·    Conducting an online community survey that received over 220 responses;

·    Analysis of demographic and trend data from a range of sources including Ausplay and the Australian Bureau of Statistics; 

·    Technical review of existing infrastructure; and

·    Review of the advantages and disadvantages of existing and other management models.

 

Summary of the Strategy

The Strategy will assist Council to plan for the future aquatic and leisure needs of the Liverpool community. Below is summary of the key components of the Strategy.

 

1.   Council’s role and function in the provision of aquatic and leisure facilities

The Strategy identifies that the Local Government Act confirms Council’s ongoing role in the provision of aquatic and leisure centres to provide the best possible value for residents and ratepayers. Council’s role includes servicing the population not serviced by the market where community benefits can be derived, providing opportunities to learn a range of physical and social activities as well as water safety and targeting specific populations with a low propensity to participate to increase their participation. Underlying this provision is the need to maximise the financial viability of aquatic and leisure centres to ensure the best possible value for residents and ratepayers.

 

2.   The aquatic and leisure needs, expectations and the current and future demands of the community:

 

Locations of aquatic and leisure centres

Significant population growth in established and new growth corridors will translate into increased demands on aquatic and leisure centre facilities. The Strategy further identifies the community’s expectations that Council will continue to provide aquatic and leisure facilities in the established areas and provide additional facilities in areas not currently serviced, to cater for current and future demand. The locations for aquatic and leisure centres to best meet the future demands of the LGA are set out below:

·    East – Holsworthy/Moorebank

·    City Centre – Woodward Place

·    Inner West – Miller

·    West – Carnes Hill

·    Outer West – Austral

 

Based on existing and future demand there will be a need to review and differentiate each centre’s service and facility offerings to ensure that it sufficiently caters to the community’s needs.

 

Unmet demand for recreation swimming, indoor sports and fitness facilities

There is an undersupply of aquatic facilities (for both structured and leisure aquatic activities), indoor sports (including court sports and gymnastics) and fitness services. The Draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy highlights:

 

·    Current unmet demand of up to 370,000 aquatics attendances in the Carnes Hill area that will grow to more than 380,000 by 2026. (A separate report will be presented to the 31 July 2019 Council meeting proposing options for potential aquatics provision as part of Stage Two of the Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct);

·    The need for aquatics provision in Austral to cater for the predicted growth in the western area of the Liverpool LGA;

·    The current inability of Whitlam Leisure Centre to meet existing and future demand, with up to 191,000 annual attendances that cannot be catered for;

·    The undersupply of indoor swimming facilities at Michael Wenden;

·    A shift in demand for swimming lessons at Holsworthy Swim Centre based on the reduction in predicted populations within the typical age demographic of 0-9 years;

·    A national and global demand for non-immersive water play facilities that includes splash parks and water slides;

·    There is a gap in the supply of indoor sports courts across the entire LGA that is not serviced either by neighbouring LGAs or by the commercial sector;

·    An expected increase of 3,095 participants in basketball, 1,432 participants in indoor football, from 2016 to 2026. Any future indoor sporting facilities should consider accommodating these and other indoor sports reflecting the cultural diversity of the community;

·    A total of 3,307 gymnastic members residing in the Liverpool LGA in 2018 with only 691 participating in clubs that operate within the LGA. Therefore 77% of Liverpool residents seeking gymnastic services do so outside their local area. To meet participation demand by 2036, an additional 10,700sqm of facility space will be required for an additional 9,738 gymnastics participants; and

·    The following trends in fitness participation:

Small group training will continue to be popular, as many people want a fitness experience mixed with a social or community experience;

Strength training will continue to grow in popularity, especially amongst women who are starting to become more aware of the health benefits of this type of activity;

Training that equips people to improve their everyday functional ability will also be attractive, especially for those who are new to exercise or have been relatively inactive for a period of time;

Gym workouts is the largest potential market within Liverpool with some 34,121 adults likely to participate in this activity.

 

3.   A technical review of existing infrastructure and proposed future facility requirements; and

 

The ageing nature of Council facilities

Council’s current aquatic facilities and leisure centres are ageing and there is a need for facilities with greater diversity of provision and capacity to meet the current and aspirational participation rates of a healthier and more active community.

 

The technical review of the existing infrastructure identifies the facilities required to meet future demand and also acknowledges the substantial costs associated with refurbishment and redevelopment to meet community needs and expectations. Further investigation is needed into the costs associated with refurbishment and redevelopment or whether construction of a new centre is the more viable option.

 

Facilities that support general wellness and rehabilitation

The growth in demand for warm water activities to promote general well-being and rehabilitation is clearly defined. The report highlights the limited provision of warm water pools and accessible pools and change rooms. Such services are unlikely to be met by the commercial sector and emphasises the important role Council plays in providing this infrastructure.

 

 

4.   Recommendations on the provision and management of future aquatic and leisure opportunities across the LGA particularly within growth areas.

The Strategy highlights the internal and external partnership models available for the provision and management of future aquatic and leisure facilities and for the revitalisation of existing sites. Models examined include the full spectrum from Council funded provision and management to long-term partnerships between the public and private sector to deliver community facilities in a timely manner including the Build-Own-Operate-Transfer (BOOT) option.

 

The report identifies the current model of contract management as the preferred management model to provide the expertise Council doesn’t have internally. Contract management provides a good level of control and the ability to address social and financial objectives as well as provide economies of scale over multiple centres.  It is recognised that longer-term management contracts of 10 years and greater allow greater opportunity for capital contributions by contractors. This information will further inform Council’s considerations of future leisure centre management options in 2021 prior to the completion of the current leisure centre management contract in July 2022.

 

This report is presented to Council for the endorsement of the draft Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy to be placed on public exhibition. The draft Strategy is attached under separate cover to this report. A further report will be brought to Council at the completion of the public exhibition period noting feedback received and any changes made to the draft Strategy in line with community feedback. However, should no submissions be received, it is recommended that Council delegate authority to the CEO to endorse the draft Liverpool Aquatic and Leisure Centres Strategy.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Provide suitable aquatic and leisure facilities that meet the existing and future demands of the Liverpool community.

Raise awareness in the community about the available services and facilities.

Support access and services for people with a disability.


Civic Leadership

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Legislative

Local Government Act 2003

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Draft Liverpool Aquatics and Leisure Centre Strategy (Under separate cover)   


171

Ordinary Meeting 31 July 2019

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 01

Investment Report June 2019

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Seek efficient and innovative methods to manage our resources

File Ref

165286.2019

Report By

John Singh - Accountant - Investments & Treasury Management

Approved By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer

 

 

executive summary

 

This report details Council’s investment portfolio.

 

As at 30 June 2019, Council held investments with a market value of $271 million.

 

The portfolio yield to the end of June 2019 is 123 basis points above the AusBond Bank Bill index.

 

 

AusBond Bank Bill Index (BBI)

Benchmark

1.97%

Portfolio yield

3.20%

Performance above benchmarks

1.23%

 

Return on investment for June 2019 was $2.1 million higher than budget.

 

Council’s investments and reporting obligations fully comply with the requirements of section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993 and clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

 

Council’s portfolio also fully complies with limits set out in its Investment Policy. NSW TCorp however has recommended that Council progressively reduce its exposure to lower-rated financial institutions to below 25% of its investment portfolio by 2021.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

 

 

 

REPORT

 

Clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the Responsible Accounting Officer must provide Council with a written report setting out details of all money that Council has invested under section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Council’s Portfolio

 

At 30 June 2019, Council held investments with a market value of $271 million. Council’s investment register detailing all its investments is provided as an attachment to this report. In summary, Council’s portfolio consisted of investments in:

The ratio of market value compared to face value of various debt securities is shown in the table below.

Asset Class

June-19

Jun-18

Senior Debts (FRN's ,TCD's & FRB)*

100.76%

100.22%

MBS (Reverse Mortgage Backed Securities)

59.48%

59.26%

T-Corp Unit Trusts

103.65%

101.26%

 

*Definition of terms

·      Transferrable Certificate of Deposit (TCD) - security issued with the same characteristics as a Term Deposit however it can be sold back (transferred) in to the market prior to maturity. A floating TCD pays a coupon linked to a variable benchmark (90 days BBSW).

·      Fixed Rate Bond (FRB) – returns Fixed Coupon (interest) Rate and is tradeable before maturity.

 

Council is fully compliant with the requirements of the Ministerial Investment Order including the grandfathering provisions. The grandfathering provisions state that Council may continue to hold to maturity, redeem or sell investments that comply with previous Ministerial Investment Orders. Any new investments must comply with the most recent Order. Council continues to closely monitor the investments in its portfolio to ensure continued compliance and minimal exposure to risk.

NSW TCorp has recommended that Council progressively reduce its exposure to lower rated financial institutions to below 25% by 2021. Council staff are working with investment advisors to meet this requirement.

 

Portfolio Maturity Profile

The table below shows the percentage of funds invested at different durations to maturity.

 

Market Value by Issuer and Institution Policy limit as per Investment Policy

 

 

Overall Portfolio Credit Framework compliance to Investment Policy

 

 

Portfolio performance against relevant market benchmark.

 

Council’s Investment Policy prescribes the AusBond Bank Bill Index (ABBI) as a benchmark to measure return on cash and fixed interest securities. The ABBI represents the average daily yield of a parcel of bank bills. Historically there has been a positive correlation between changes in the cash rate and the resulting impact on the ABBI benchmark.

 

The portfolio yield to 30 June 2019 exceeded the AusBond Bank Bill index by 123 basis points (3.20% against 1.97 %).

 

Council continues to achieve a solid outcome despite ongoing margin contraction and significantly lower market term deposit yields. Comparative yields for the previous months are charted below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Performance of Portfolio Returns against Budget

 

Council’s investment income for June 2019 exceeded budget by $2.1 million mainly due to higher actual monthly average portfolio holdings compared to budgeted monthly average portfolio holdings for the period.

 

 

Investment Portfolio at a Glance

 

 

Portfolio Performance

 

 

MCWB01114_0000[1]

The portfolio yield to 30 June 2019 exceeded the AusBond Bank Bill index by 123 basis points (3.20% against 1.97%).

Annual Income vs. Budget

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Council’s investment interest income exceeded budget by $2.1 million as at 30 June 2019 mainly due to higher actual monthly average portfolio holdings compared to budgeted monthly average portfolio holdings.

 

Investment Policy Compliance

 

Legislative Requirements

 

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Portfolio Credit Rating Limit

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Institutional Exposure Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Overall Portfolio Credit Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Term to Maturity Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

 

 

 

Economic Outlook – Reserve Bank of Australia

 

The Reserve Bank decided to lower the cash rate by 25 basis point in its meeting on 2 July 2019, to the official cash rate of 1.00 per cent. The current 1.00 per cent cash rate is at a historically low level and impacts returns on investment.

 

Certificate of Responsible Accounting Officer

 

The Chief Financial Officer, as Responsible Accounting Officer, certifies that the investments listed in the attached report have been made in accordance with section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 and Council’s Investment Policy at the time of their placement. The previous investments are covered by the grandfathering clauses of the current investment guidelines issued by the Minister for Local Government.

 

Independent verification by Head of Audit, Risk and Improvement (HARI)

 

Council has requested an on-going independent review of its investment portfolio by the Audit Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC) or its representative under delegated authority. The ARIC has agreed for its Chairperson to provide a certificate on a quarterly basis – the next certificate will be presented to Council on 28 August 2019.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Council’s investment interest income exceeded budget by $2.1 million as at 30 June 2019 mainly due to higher actual monthly average portfolio holdings compared to budgeted monthly average portfolio holdings

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Council is fully compliant with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1993 – Investment Order (authorized investments) and with reporting requirements under clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Investment Portfolio - June 2019  


173

CORP 01

Investment Report June 2019

Attachment 1

Investment Portfolio - June 2019

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator

 


175

Ordinary Meeting 31 July 2019

City  Infrastructure and Environment Report

 

INF 01

Update on Governor Macquarie Drive, Warwick Farm - Response to NOM05

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

168550.2019

Report By

Madhu Pudasaini - Manager Technical Support

Approved By

Raj Autar - Director City Infrastructure and Environment

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council, at its meeting held on 29 May 2019, Council resolved the following a Notice of Motion (NOM 05 – Warwick Farm):

 

That Council:

 

1.   Investigate parking restrictions on the streets of Warwick Farm near the horse trainer’s precinct and report back to Council at our next meeting. This should include 4 hour parking or parking permits for residents;

2.   Investigate ways to improve, beautify, and increase maintenance in Warwick Farm acknowledging there has been a significant change in the last year and half with the opening of the 5 star William Inglis Hotel and conference centre. Report this back to Council at our July meeting;

3.   Investigate ways to replant the large trees on Governor Macquarie Drive that were lost with the recent road widening and plant a boulevard of mature trees with a report to come back to Council in July;

4.   Conduct a count of truck usage with a report to come back to Council about solutions and strategies on how to minimise truck movements and improve safety for residents and horse trainers. Previous counts to be put forward also;

5.   Note the land acquisition funds are in the general reserves budget to be used to finalise the by-pass road for trucks travelling through Warwick Farm. Note that Council is waiting on the RMS report and request a report to be submitted to the June 2019 Council meeting as to the progress.

6.   Council staff to consult with the Warwick Farm residents within the first two weeks in July 2019 on the Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS). A community meeting to also subsequently be convened with residents, landowners, and other stakeholders as soon as practicable on the future of the Warwick Farm equine precinct.

7.   Bring any outstanding proposals to Council as soon as practicable with an update (which includes when information will be received) to be provided to the June 2019 Council meeting.

A report was provided to Council at its meeting held on 26 June 2019 addressing points 1, 4, 5, 6 and 7 of the resolution. This report provides an update to points 2 and 3 of the resolution.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the report.

 

REPORT

 

Status update – Resolution 2 from NOM 05

 

Investigate ways to improve, beautify, and increase maintenance in Warwick Farm acknowledging there has been a significant change in the last year and half with the opening of the 5 star William Inglis Hotel and conference centre. Report this back to Council at our July meeting.

 

As part of a Voluntary Planning Agreement (VPA) with Council, The Australian Turf Club (ATC) have completed works to widen and realign Governor Macquarie Drive (GMD) along the frontage of the Inglis development.  These works are completed, with the exception of the short missing section of the footpath/cycleway on the northern side of the road, where the horse access tunnel passes beneath GMD.  This will be completed when the horse tunnel is extended in length, to provide the additional space required for the footpath/cycleway.

 

Maintenance responsibilities for the section of road and the verge remain with ATC, as a requirement of the VPA.  Council will resume responsibility for maintenance from September 2019.   Following a recent inspection, Council is preparing a maintenance and weed control plan for this section of GMD and the adjacent verge. 

 

Status update – Resolutions 3 from NOM 05

Investigate ways to replant the large trees on Governor Macquarie Drive that were lost with the recent road widening and plant a boulevard of mature trees with a report to come back to Council in July.

Council has investigated the possibility of planting additional trees along GMD between the Georges River and Shore Street. Council officers visited the area to explore the opportunities. The findings are shown in the attached plan Attachment 1 - GMD Potential