COUNCIL AGENDA

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

26 February 2020

 

FRANCIS GREENWAY CENTRE

170 GEORGE STREET LIVERPOOL


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You are hereby notified that an Ordinary Council Meeting of Liverpool City Council will be held at the Francis Greenway Centre, 170 George Street, Liverpool on Wednesday, 26 February 2020 commencing at 6.00pm. Doors to the Francis Greenway Centre will open at 5.50pm.

 

Liverpool City Council Meetings are livestreamed onto Council’s website and remain on Council’s website for a period of 12 months.  If you have any enquiries, please contact Council and Executive Services on 8711 7584.

 

 

 


Kiersten Fishburn

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

 

 


 

 

 


Order of Business

 

                                                                                                              PAGE     TAB

Opening

Acknowledgment of Country and Prayer

National Anthem

Apologies 

Condolences

Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council Meeting held on 05 February 2020.............................................................. 6

Declarations of Interest

Public Forum

Mayoral Report

NIL

Notices of Motion Of Rescission

NIL

Chief Executive Officer Report

CEO 01           Biannual Progress Report - July-December 2019......................................... 75......... 1

City Economy and Growth Report

EGROW 01    Developer Contributions - instalment payments for secondary dwellings..... 77......... 2

EGROW 02    Post Exhibition Report - Draft Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 (Amendment 25)............................................................................................. 82......... 3

EGROW 03    Report on Implementation Strategy for Smoke-Free Areas........................... 87......... 4

EGROW 04    Post Exhibition Report - Draft Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 78) and Draft Liverpool Development Control Plan (Amendment 35) - land subject to Basin 14 and Bernera Road, Edmondson Park.................... 92......... 5

EGROW 05    Draft Intermodal Precinct Committee Charter.............................................. 109......... 6

EGROW 06    Liverpool City Centre Car Parking Strategy................................................. 120......... 7

EGROW 07    Endorsement of submission on Draft Western Sydney Aerotropolis Plan and Aerotropolis Planning Package (to be included in Addendum Booklet)

City Community and Culture Report

COM 01          Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship........................................... 129......... 8

City Corporate Report

CORP 01        Investment Report January 2020................................................................. 135......... 9

CORP 02        Reducing Red Tape - Development of Policies, Standards, Charters, Procedures and Strategies............................................................................................... 146....... 10

CORP 03        Budget Review - December 2019................................................................ 174....... 11

CORP 04        Draft Policy - Customer Engagement and Quality Assurance..................... 201....... 12

CORP 05        Provision of Mail Services for Council.......................................................... 224....... 13

CORP 06        Moorebank Intermodal.................................................................................. 226....... 14

City Presentation Report

NIL

City Infrastructure and Environment Report

NIL

Committee Reports

CTTE 01         Minutes of the Liverpool Community Safety and Crime Prevention Advisory Committee Meeting held on 5 December 2019............................................ 230....... 15

CTTE 02         Liverpool Sports Committee Minutes of meeting held 28 November 2019. 236....... 16

CTTE 03         Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council Meeting held on 10 December 2019 247      17

CTTE 04         Minutes of the Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee Meeting held on 29 January 2020................................................................ 254....... 18

Questions with Notice

QWN 01          Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Community Sport Infrastructure Grants 294      19

QWN 02          Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Public Art for New Civic Centre.......... 295....... 20

QWN 03          Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Seniors Community Consultation....... 296....... 21

QWN 04          Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Monitoring of Air Quality in Child Care Centres 297       22

QWN 05          Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Liverpool Community Hub.................. 298....... 23

QWN 06          Question with Notice - Clr Harle - Membership on Planning Panels........... 299....... 24

QWN 07          Question with Notice - Clr Ayyad - Memorial School of Arts........................ 300....... 25

QWN 08          Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Section 7/11's.................................... 301....... 26

QWN 09          Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Contamination Reports...................... 302....... 27

QWN 10          Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Moorebank Recyclers........................ 303....... 28

QWN 11          Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Civic Place......................................... 304....... 29  

Presentations by Councillors

 

Notices of Motion

NOM 01          Out of Office Hours Compliance Officers..................................................... 305....... 30

NOM 02          Wildlife Protection Special Levy................................................................... 307....... 31

NOM 03          Rail Services West of Bankstown................................................................. 310....... 32

NOM 04          Flooding & Drainage Management Austral Precinct.................................... 312....... 33

NOM 05          Auditiory Processing Disorder...................................................................... 314....... 34

NOM 06          Media in election period................................................................................ 316....... 35

NOM 07          Personnel Matter........................................................................................... 317....... 36  

 

Council in Closed Session

The following items are listed for consideration by Council in Closed Session with the public excluded, in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 1993 as listed below:

 

CONF 01    Mayor and Councillors Charity Ball 2020

Reason:     Item CONF 01 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(a)(g) of the Local Government Act because it contains personal matters concerning particular individuals (other than councillors); and, advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege

 

CONF 02    Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee Meeting held 31 January 2020

Reason:     Item CONF 02 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(a) of the Local Government Act because it contains personal matters concerning particular individuals (other than councillors).

 

CONF 03    RCL2828– Provision of Asbestos Removal, Site Remediation and Demolition Services

Reason:     Item CONF 03 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(d i) of the Local Government Act because it contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.

 

CONF 04    Proposed Acquisition of Lot C DP 19162, 78 Rickard Road, Chipping Norton under the Moorebank Voluntary Acquisition Scheme

Reason:     Item CONF 04 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(c) of the Local Government Act because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

CONF 05    Personnel Matter

Reason:     Item CONF 05 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(a) of the Local Government Act because it contains personal matters concerning particular individuals (other than councillors).  

Close

 


 

 

 

MINUTES OF THE Ordinary Meeting

HELD ON 5 February 2020

 

 

PRESENT:

Deputy Mayor Karnib

Councillor Ayyad

Councillor Balloot

Councillor Hadchiti

Councillor Hadid

Councillor Hagarty

Councillor Harle

Councillor Kaliyanda

Councillor Rhodes

Councillor Shelton

Ms Kiersten Fishburn, Chief Executive Officer

Mr Tim Moore, Director City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

Mr Chris White, Director City Corporate

Dr Eddie Jackson, Director City Community and Culture

Mr Peter Patterson, Director City Presentation

Mr Raj Autar, Director City Infrastructure and Environment

Mr Andrew Stevenson, Chief Strategy and Engagement Officer

Ms Tina Sangiuliano, Strategic Organisational Change Manager 

Mr Vishwa Nadan, Chief Financial Officer

Mr Michael Knight, Deputy General Counsel

Mr George Georgakis, Manager Council and Executive Services

Ms Susan Ranieri, Coordinator Council and Executive Services (minutes)

 

The meeting commenced at 6.00pm.

 

STATEMENT REGARDING WEBCASTING OF MEETING

The Deputy Mayor reminded everyone that in accordance with Council’s Code of Meeting Practice (other than the Public Forum Section), the meeting is being livestreamed.

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF COUNTRY, PRAYER OF COUNCIL AND AFFIRMATION TO BE READ BY

 

The prayer of the Council was read by Reverend Bruce Hammonds from Liverpool Presbyterian Church.

 

NATIONAL ANTHEM

The National Anthem performed by Rebekah Ferro was played at the meeting.

APOLOGIES

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Hagarty

 

That a leave of absence be granted for Mayor Waller for her absence from the meeting.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

CONDOLENCES

 

Mr John Jewell (read by Clr Rhodes).

 

Long-time Liverpool resident John Jewell passed away on Monday 16 December 2019.

 

John Jewell is well known for his service to the local community and has served on many committees including:

 

He was a member of the Liverpool Sailing Club.

 

John organised the 75th Anniversary Commemoration of Lieutenant George Cantello’s death at Lieutenant Cantello Reserve, Hammondville.  At that time he arranged for the American family descendants to come to Australia inviting them into his own home so that they could participate in their father and grandfather’s 75th Memorial Service, after which he proudly became their personal tour guide, taking them to Sydney’s iconic tourist attractions.

 

John was a passional advocate for the monument erected in Lieutenant Cantello’s honour, making sure it was maintained and presented well for the memorial services.

 

He was an Officer of the Order of Liverpool Award recipient in 2017 for services to the community.

 

He was the local go to person for the history of Liverpool and in particular the Hammondville community where he grew up and attended school as a young boy.

 

John was a living memory of the Hammondville housing grants, from the depression during and just after WWII. 

He would delight in telling me how the housing grants were only open to those people who had recently been laid off work, were married, had kids, and had a skill to offer the Hammondville community. If you ticked all those boxes, you were then entered into a lottery system and the lucky winners had to build their own homes on a block of land given to them on the basis they supplied something of value to the community.

 

In John’s family, they had a cow, and they supplied milk to the Community.

 

He would tell me about the Masterton family of Masterton homes here in Liverpool who was also one of the lottery winners, his service to the community was to oversee the building of the homes.

 

The only condition placed on the new home owners John would tell me was that if and when you got a job, you would then and only then pay for your home at a nominal percentage of your wage.

 

John’s love and passion for Liverpool had no limits. He was the first to put his hand up to help whoever and whenever.

 

John had a love for working with wood and would make all sorts of wooden objects that he would give away to people who also shared a passion for Liverpool.…and yes, I too was on the receiving end of one of his treasures made with love from one of Liverpool’s finest residents.

 

John was an asset to the Liverpool community, he will be sadly missed.

 

To his wife, children and grandchildren, I wish to extend heartfelt condolences.

 

May John rest in peace, he was an exceptional citizen of Liverpool.

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council writes to the family of Mr Jewell, the families of the two volunteer firefighters who lost their lives and the families of the four children who lost their lives in Oatlands on Saturday, 1 February 2020 expressing our condolences for their loss.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.


 

Confirmation of Minutes

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting held on 11 December 2019 be confirmed as a true record of that meeting.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Declarations of Interest

 

Clr Hagarty declared a non-pecuniary interest, less than significant interest in the following item:

 

Item COM 01:     Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship.

 

Reason:              Clr Hagarty is an ordinary member of the Liverpool and District Historical                         Society which is recommended for a grant.   

 

Clr Hagarty left the Chambers for the duration of this item.

 

 

Clr Shelton declared a non-pecuniary interest, less than significant interest in the following item:

 

Item COM 01:     Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship.

 

Reason:              Clr Shelton is an ordinary member of the Liverpool and District Historical                          Society. No offices held.  

 

Clr Shelton left the Chambers for the duration of this item.

 

 

Clr Kaliyanda declared a non-pecuniary interest, less than significant interest in the following item:

 

Item COM 01:     Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship.

 

Reason:              Clr Kaliyanda is an ordinary member of the Liverpool and District                                      Historical Society. She does not hold any official positions.  The Liverpool                                and Districts Historical Society is applying for a grant.   

 

Clr Kaliyanda left the Chambers for the duration of this item.

 

Clr Rhodes declared a non-pecuniary interest, less than significant interest in the following item:

 

Item COM 01:     Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship.

 

Reason:              Clr Rhodes was once a financial member of the Liverpool and District                               Historical Society.

 

Clr Rhodes left the Chambers for the duration of this item.

 

Public Forum

Presentation – items not on agenda

Nil.

Representation – items on agenda

1.   Mr John Anderson addressed Council on the following item:

     Item No. NOM 04 Moorebank Intermodal.

 

Clr Hadchiti left the Chambers at 6:15pm.

 

Clr Hadchiti returned to the Chambers at 6:17pm.

 

Motion:                        Moved: Clr Rhodes     Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That a three minute extension of time be given to the speaker.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

2.   Mr Erik Rakowski addressed Council on the following item:

 

     Item No: NOM 04 Moorebank Intermodal.

 

Motion:                        Moved: Clr Hadid        Seconded: Clr Rhodes 

 

That a three minute extension of time be given to the speaker.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

3.   Dr Agnes Chiu addressed Council on the following item:

 

     Item No. NOM 01 Feral Cats and TNR Program.

 

Chief Executive Officer Report

 

ITEM NO:       CEO 01

FILE NO:        010444.2020

SUBJECT:     2020 Australian Local Government Women's Association NSW Branch Conference

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council open the invitation to any Councillor wishing to attend and that Councillors advise the relevant officer as soon as possible.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       CEO 02

FILE NO:        010866.2020

SUBJECT:     2020 National General Assembly of Local Government

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That Council:

 

  1. Notes that the 2020 National General Assembly of Local Government to be held in Canberra from Sunday 14 June – Wednesday 17 June 2020;

 

  1. Councillors to contact the Councillors Support Officer if wishing to attend; and

 

  1. Consider submitting the following motions for debate at the National General Assembly and a report be submitted to the March 2020 Council meeting for Council to consider the motions:

 

 

  1. Koala Protection Order

 

Proposed motion: That LGA advocate for a National Koala Protection Order.

 

Background: Koala populations have been desecrated as a result of the Australian Bushfires and are under ever increasing threat by logging, the clearing of farming land and urban development. Unless there is a Nation Wide Protection Order with substantial fines and strict enforcement Australia may lose it famous national icon forever.

 

  1. Proposed Motion: That LGA advocate for Sustainable Long Term Drought Mitigation Action Plan

 

Background: That LGA advocate for a National Action Plan to address negative impacts of drought to deliver sustainable, long term solutions that ensures water supply to all Australian cities and towns.

 

The recent drought has seen unprecedented number of towns run out of water requiring a national co-ordination to develop:

 

a)     A national plan to plant indigenous drought proofing trees that will encourage rain and the retention of water in top and sub soil.

b)     Limit on logging and land clearing plan that enforces for every tree removed 4 drought proofing trees must be planted and maintained in same local government area.

c)      Collection of flood waters into subterranean dams.

d)     A national water pipeline network.

 

 

  1. Sustainable Housing Development

 

Proposed motion: That LGA advocate for the federal government to enforce national housing development regulations that:

a)     Limits housing developments to cover no more than 40% of block size in urban developments.

b)     Ensures that Housing developments comply with heat sink regulations by introducing substantial fines for noncomplying developments.

 

  1. Feral Cats in urban areas

 

Proposed motion: That LGA advocate for funding:

a)     From the Federal Government and NSW State Government to support changes that enables Council to provide services that identifies stray cats that are not microchipped, nor desexed and found on the streets to be microchipped, desexed and housed until rehomed.

 

Increase of feral cats in suburban areas continues to grow to near plague proportions. Cats can breed at just 6 weeks of age and subsequently every 6 weeks after birth of any litter.

 

Unless action is taken feral cat populations will only continue to grow to plague proportions. Local Government needs financial support to address this issue.

 

  1. Fast track Western City rail transportation network

 

Proposed motion: That: LGA advocate for Federal Government to provide funding to fast track a rail transportation network in the Western City.

 

  1. Koala Sanctuary and wildlife hospital

 

Proposed motion: That LGA advocate for State and Federal funding to provide Koala sanctuary and wildlife animal hospital in the southern end of the Western Sydney Parklands of the Liverpool LGA.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.


 

 

 


 

City Economy and Growth Report

 

ITEM NO:       EGROW 01

FILE NO:        330736.2019

SUBJECT:     Innovation Strategy - first year review

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council:

 

  1. Receive and note the report; and

 

  1. Thank the staff for the thorough presentation presented at the Councillor Briefing Session on 30 January 2020 on the first year review of the Innovation Strategy and congratulate them for the work being done.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


 

City Community and Culture Report

 

Clrs Shelton, Kaliyanda, Hagarty and Rhodes left the Chambers at 6:41pm.

ITEM NO:       COM 01

FILE NO:        317493.2019

SUBJECT:     Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Balloot

 

That Council approves the recommendation of $20,000 (GST exclusive) under the Corporate Sponsorship Program for the following projects:

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Vedic Festival Incorporated

Festival of Chariots 2020

$10,000

Bonnie Support Services Ltd.

South Western Sydney International Women’s Day Leadership Forum

 

$10,000

That Council approves the recommendation of $10,000 (GST exclusive) under the Community Grants Program for the following projects:

Applicant

Project

Recommended

The City of Liverpool and District Historical Society

 

Liverpool Library Exhibition Space

$5,000

Liverpool Neighbourhood Connections

Learn To Earn II

$5,000

That Council approves the recommendation of $30,000 (GST exclusive) under the Matching Grants Program for the following projects:

 

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Moorebank Liverpool District Hockey Club

 

Spectator Shelter

$15,000

Playgroup Queensland Ltd (trading as Sing & Grow) Australia

Sing & Grow for Liverpool Community Hubs

$15,000

 

 

That Council approves the recommendation of $10,000 (GST exclusive) under the Sustainable Environment Grants Program for the following projects:

Applicant

Project

Recommended

SCRAP

Integrating the Process at Holsworthy Community Garden

$5,000

Civic Disability Services

Civic Seedling Start Up

$5,000

 

 

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


Clrs Kaliyanda, Shelton, Rhodes and Hagarty returned to the Chambers at 6:42pm.

 

ITEM NO:       COM 02

FILE NO:        017944.2020

SUBJECT:     Council delegation to Toda City for the Tokyo Olympics in July 2020

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

  1. Open the invitation to any Councillor & CEO or delegate wishing to attend subject to it being at no cost to Council whether monetary or by use of frequent flyer points; and

 

  1. Make arrangements for travel if any interest is shown.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.


ITEM NO:       COM 03

FILE NO:        019145.2020

SUBJECT:     Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage 2 Master Plan - Progress Report

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.         Receives and notes the Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage 2 Master Plan Progress Report; and

 

2.         As part of the final report on the draft masterplan to be presented to Council in May 2020, a full range of funding options/sources be provided.

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 


 

City Corporate Report

 

ITEM NO:       CORP 01

FILE NO:        003742.2020

SUBJECT:     Investment Report December 2019

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadid                 Seconded: Clr Hagarty

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


 

Committee Reports

 

ITEM NO:       CTTE 01

FILE NO:        000059.2020

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Heritage Advisory Committee on 5 November 2019.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council:

 

  1. Receive and note the Minutes of the Liverpool Heritage Advisory Committee Meeting held on 5 November 2019; and

 

2.   Endorse the recommendations in the Minutes.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 02

FILE NO:        001471.2020

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee held on 2 December 2019

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee Meeting held on 2 December 2019.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 03

FILE NO:        001952.2020

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Tourism and CBD Committee meeting held on 3 December 2019

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Tourism and CBD Committee Meeting held on 3 December 2019, noting that quorum was lost in the second half of the meeting, and there were no recommendations.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.


ITEM NO:       CTTE 04

FILE NO:        007951.2020

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Liverpool Access Committee Meeting held on 12 December 2019

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Liverpool Access Committee meeting held on 12 December 2019.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


 

Questions with Notice

 

ITEM NO:       QWN 01

FILE NO:        331507.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Civic Place

 

Please address the following:

 

Given the importance of this project and the cost to the rate payer, has an external audit been undertaken on the process so far from its inception to where we currently stand?

 

If not does the CEO thinks it’s worth doing?

 

Response

 

The project has been subject to repeated and ongoing review by Council’s Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC), as well as close oversight by Audit NSW (as part of Council’s annual external audit program).  No dedicated external audit has been conducted. In the absence of any concerns having been raised by either ARIC or Audit NSW, staff do not see the need for a separate audit of the project at this time.  However, if Council were minded to submit the project to further audit, staff would be more than happy to facilitate that process.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

  1. Engage a suitably qualified organisation to undertake a full review/audit on the Civic Place project from its inception, including but not limited to the changes of the design to value for money; and

 

2.    Resources be allocated from the unrestricted reserve to undertake this review.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Clr Shelton asked that his name be recorded as having voted against the motion. 


ITEM NO:       QWN 02

FILE NO:        331536.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Contamination Reports

 

Please address the following:

 

1.   What stage contamination reports does Council require with the submission of a DA?

 

2.   How do our requirements compare to other Councils or industry standards?

 

Response

 

State Environmental Planning Policy No. 55 – Remediation of Land (SEPP No. 55) contains statutory provisions that compel Liverpool City Council to consider contamination and the need for remediation when determining a Development Application. Clause 7(1) of SEPP No. 55 stipulates that a consent authority must not consent to the carrying out of any development on land unless:

 

a)   It has considered whether the land is contaminated, and

b)   If the land is contaminated, it is satisfied that the land is suitable in its contaminated state (or will be suitable after remediation) for the purpose for which the development is proposed to be carried out, and

c)   if the land requires remediation to be made suitable for the purpose for which the development is proposed to be carried out, it is satisfied that the land will be remediated before the land is used for that purpose

 

Risk of exposure to underlying contamination is likely to increase where a proposed development involves a transition to a more sensitive use. Therefore, Clause 7(2) of SEPP No. 55 requires the consent authority to consider a report specifying the findings of a preliminary investigation of land if the proposed development involves a change of use on any land specified in sub clause 4 of the Policy. This includes land within an investigation area and land where potentially contaminating activities identified in Table 1 of the contaminated land planning guidelines have been undertaken.

 

The requirement for a preliminary investigation of the land extends to a proposed development involving a transition to a more sensitive land use (residential, educational, recreational, child care and hospital land) where there is no knowledge or incomplete knowledge of the site’s history and it would have been lawful to carry out potentially contaminating activities on-site during this time.

 

 

 

Table 1 of the contaminated land planning guidelines identify some activities that may cause contamination including:

 

• acid/alkali plant and formulation

• agricultural/horticultural activities

• airports

• asbestos production and disposal

• chemicals manufacture and formulation

• defence works

• drum re-conditioning works

• dry cleaning establishments

• electrical manufacturing (transformers)

• electroplating and heat treatment premises

• engine works

• explosives industry

• gas works

• iron and steel works

• landfill sites

• metal treatment

• mining and extractive industries

• oil production and storage

• paint formulation and manufacture

• pesticide manufacture and formulation

• power stations

• railway yards

• scrap yards

• service stations

• sheep and cattle dips

• smelting and refining

• tanning and associated trades

• waste storage and treatment

• wood preservation

 

This is not an exhaustive list and other potentially contaminating uses can be considered at the discretion of the determining authority. It is the Applicant’s responsibility to provide Council with the information to address SEPP No. 55.

 

In addition to SEPP No. 55, Clause 1, Section 2.3.7 Site Contamination of the Liverpool City Council Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan dated November 2016 stipulates that ‘all subdivision Development Applications, and applications proposing a change of use to a more sensitive land use (e.g. residential, education, public recreation facility etc.), shall be accompanied by a Stage 1 Preliminary Site Investigation prepared in accordance with the NSW EPA Contaminated Sites Guidelines, State Environmental Planning Policy 55 – Remediation of Land and the Contaminated Land Management Act, 1995 (sic) and relevant Council Policies. Liverpool City Council Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan covers development in Austral, East Leppington and a portion of Denham Court.

 

Clause 2 Section 2.3.7 Site Contamination of the Liverpool City Council Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan dated November 2016 specifies that ‘where the Stage 1 Investigation identifies potential or actual site contamination a Stage 2 Detailed Site Investigation must be prepared in accordance with the NSW EPA Contaminated Sites Guidelines, State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) No. 55 – Remediation of Land and the Contaminated Land Management Act, 1995 (sic) and any relevant Council Policies. A Remediation Action Plan (RAP) will be required to be submitted and approved by Council prior to development consent being granted for areas identified as contaminated land in the Stage 2 Site Investigation.

 

In accordance with these requirements, the Applicant would be required to engage the services of a suitably qualified contaminated land consultant to prepare a Stage 1 Preliminary Site Investigation for the Land. The Preliminary Site Investigation shall comply with applicable guidelines made or approved by the NSW EPA under the Contaminated Land Management Act 1997 and identify all past and present potentially contaminating activities; identify potential contamination types; discuss the site condition; provide a preliminary assessment of site contamination; and assess the need for further investigations.  

Where contaminating activities are suspected or known to have occurred, or if site history is incomplete, the Application may need to be supported by a Stage 2 Detailed Site Investigation. This investigation would need to give regard to the potential effects of any contaminants on public health, the environment and building structures and shall meet the sampling density outlined in the NSW EPA Contaminated Sites Sampling Design Guidelines (1995).

 

If the Stage 2 Detailed Site Investigation indicates that the site poses unacceptable risks to human health or the environment, a Remedial Action Plan (RAP) would need to be prepared by a suitably qualified contaminated land consultant in accordance with applicable guidelines made or approved by the NSW EPA under the Contaminated Land Management Act 1997. In these circumstances, the Remedial Action Plan shall be referred to Liverpool City Council for review prior to determination of the Application.

 

The contaminated land planning guidelines state that accredited site auditors can assist a planning authority by commenting on or verifying information provided by a proponent in relation to site assessment. Engaging a site auditor can provide greater certainty about the information on which the planning authority is basing its decision, particularly where sensitive uses are proposed on land that may be contaminated and a statement about the suitability of the site is required.

 

 

 

 

 

A Site Audit may be necessary when the planning authority:

 

·    believes on reasonable grounds that the information provided by the proponent is incorrect or incomplete;

·    wishes to verify the information provided by the proponent adheres to appropriate standards, procedures and guidelines; and

·    does not have the internal resources to conduct its own technical review.

 

SEPP No. 55 is a statewide approach to the assessment, management and remediation of contaminated land in NSW. Consent Authorities within NSW are required to address the requirements of SEPP No. 55 and other Local Government Authorities including but not limited to Parramatta, Cumberland, Camden and Bayside have implemented lodgement requirements and assessment approaches similar to Liverpool.

 

Submission of the aforementioned documentation when lodging the Development Application enables Council to complete the planning assessment in a timely manner.  To improve environmental health outcomes and efficiency during the development assessment process, Council also requires Development Applications to be supported by technical reports prepared by suitably qualified and industry certified environmental consultants.

 

In this regard, contaminated site reports shall be prepared by a suitably qualified contaminated land consultant who is certified under either the Environment Institute of Australia and New Zealand’s Certified Environmental Practitioner (Site Contamination) scheme (CEnvP(SC)) or the Soil Science Australia Certified Professional Soil Scientist Contaminated Site Assessment and Management (CPSS CSAM) scheme.

 

It is highly recommended that if clarification as to the extent of technical reporting required to be submitted with a Development Application is required that applicants utilise Council’s services prior to lodgment of a DA including a Pre-DA application meeting, lodgment of a planning enquiry or seeking advice from Council’s Planning Advisory team.

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 03

FILE NO:        331512.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Middleton Grange

 

Please address the following:

 

1.   How much has been collected in 7/11’s for Middleton Grange?

 

2.   What projects are yet to be completed under Sect 7/11?

 

3.   What is the projected 7/11 still to come in?

 

4.   Who owns the sections of roads that run through the Parklands, for example Flynn and Twenty Seventh Ave?

 

5.   Are there any plans to close off any existing roads referred to in point 4?

 

6.   If the road under the M7 has all its approvals in place does Council have the funds to actually build it?

 

Response

 

1.   How much has been collected in 7.11’s for Middleton Grange?

      As of 30 November 2019, Council has collected $53,914,690 in s7.11 contributions in Middleton Grange. Council has provided works in accordance with the Contributions       Plan to the value of $51,688,101.

 

2.   What projects are yet to be completed under Sect 7.11?

      There is a range of projects encompassing roads/transport, drainage, community         facility and recreational. The full list of projects that are identified for delivery within Middleton Grange as a part of Liverpool Developer Contributions Plan 2009 is   included in Appendix A. This list also includes projects funded in the 2019/20 budget.


 

3.   What is the projected 7.11 still to come in?

      There are two main elements to future contributions in Middleton Grange –          development of the remaining residential land and development of the town centre.

      Estimated contributions for the town centre is around $23,000,000. This will be   confirmed once a DA is lodged with final yields.

      It is expected that the remaining residential land will provide an additional $3,277,500. This may change depending on the specific densities delivered, as      the     contribution is based on a per dwelling rate.

 

4.   Who owns the sections of roads that run through the Parklands, for example Flynn and Twenty Seventh Ave?

Council is the owner and roads authority for all roads that run through the western Sydney Parklands.

5.   Are there any plans to close of any existing roads referred to in point 4?

There are currently no plans to close any roads that run through the Parklands area.

 

6.   If the road under the M7 has all its approvals in place does Council have the funds to actually build it?

Council currently has half of the estimated $6m budget for the works as a part of Section 7.11 contributions for Middleton Grange. The additional funds will need to be allocated by Council as a part of a future budget update.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Hagarty

 

That Council immediately review the condition of roads such as Twenty Seventh Avenue and report back to Council in the March 2020 meeting on the cost to bring the roads up to a standard that allows driving on them.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 04

FILE NO:        331516.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - DA's and Planning Proposals

 

Please address the following:

 

1.   Based on what has been seen so far, is it fair to say that if the above are assessed externally they are turned around quicker?

 

Response

 

Development Applications

 

Council outsourced two development applications for external assessment, one in 2018 and one in 2019 (DA-191/2018 and DA-228/2019).

 

DA-191/2018 was withdrawn and Council records indicate that it took 188 working days to be finalised. DA-228/2019 was approved by the Local Planning Panel and Council records indicate that it took 103 working days to be determined.

 

In 2018 and 2019, Council’s average determination times were 87 days and 98 days respectively. Based on this information, applications dealt with internally as opposed to externally were determined quicker.

 

Planning Proposals

 

Consultants have assessed eight planning proposals on behalf of Council over the past two years to supplement existing staff resources within the Planning & Transport Strategy department. The work undertaken by consultants involves reviewing the planning proposal and preparing a report for the advice of the Liverpool Local Planning Panel and for a Council decision.

 

During this time, Council has been responsible for the preparation of several key strategic planning projects involving the use of significant staff resources, including the Local Strategic Planning Statement, the Community Participation Plan and the Local Environmental Plan review. Council has also been involved, through the Western Sydney Planning Partnership on the development of the Western Sydney Aerotropolis Plan.

The use of consultants to undertake the assessment of some planning proposals has been necessary to ensure that the high workload of the strategic planning team is appropriately managed to minimise the time taken from lodgment of the planning proposal to a decision of Council on whether the planning proposal should proceed to a Gateway determination.  

 

 

 

 

Planning proposals undertake a 7-step process, including:

 

·    Preliminary assessment (or preparation of proposal if initiated by Council)

·    Prepare a report on the merits of the proposal for the advice of the Liverpool Local Planning Panel (LPP)

·    Seek endorsement from Council to proceed to Gateway determination

·    Gateway determination by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE)

·    Action conditions of Gateway determination (including public agency consultation and public exhibition)

·    Seek endorsement from Council to finalise planning proposal

·    Liaise with Parliamentary Counsel to gazette changes to the LEP (DPIE may do this depending on authorisation)

Consultants have assisted with the first two steps in the planning proposal process with staff responsible for the remaining once the Council has decided whether a proposal should proceed.

 

The outsourcing of planning proposals assists greatly in managing workloads and ensuring the merit assessment of a proposal is considered in a timely manner. This is particularly the case at present given the significant development interest in Liverpool and legislative change requiring Councils to prepare a LSPS and review their LEP. However, the use of consultants does not necessarily mean that planning proposals are gazetted quicker as the use of consultants is largely limited to the initial phases of the planning proposal process, with Council officers required to do most of the work after a decision is made by Council on whether a proposal should proceed. 

 

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 05

FILE NO:        331517.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Flooding

 

Please address the following:

1.    In the history of Liverpool has there ever been a time where a development has been required to be built above the PMF?

 

Response

 

Council’s management of its flood prone lands is governed by the NSW Government’s Flood Prone Lands Policy, its Floodplain Development Manual and associated Guidelines, which together support the wise and rational development of flood prone lands. While Government Guidelines preclude the use of probable maximum flood (PMF) to set development controls for residential development, it acknowledges that development controls may need to be applied to critical infrastructure (such as hospitals) and vulnerable developments (like nursing homes) in floods exceeding the 100-year event. Further, the Guidelines also require Councils to fully consider accessibility of evacuation routes for all types of developments in flood events exceeding the 100-year flood to ensure people affected by the more rare and extreme floods can be safely and quickly evacuated.

 

To this end, there are numerous critical and vulnerable developments within Liverpool where Council has adopted and accordingly applied the PMF as the flood planning level.  Examples include the Scalabirini Village Aged Care Facility at Chipping Norton, and the Liverpool Boys and Liverpool Girls High Schools in Liverpool.

 

Further, and as noted above, while PMF levels are not suitable to set development controls for residential developments, under the Government Policy, it is prudent to consider evacuation routes and its viability in floods exceeding the 100-year event. It is possible that while flood free and accessible to 100-year flood level, evacuation routes could become inaccessible quite rapidly in flood events even slightly over the 100-year event, thus making any emergency evacuation and recovery efforts impossible, with consequent serious risks to human life.

 

Areas in Moorebank East that are affected by flooding from the Georges River are relevant examples of this. These areas are located above the 100-year flood level and can be accessible in floods up to that level. However, in larger floods they will become flood islands isolated by hazardous flood waters, and it will be quite possible for these flood islands to be completely inundated by hazardous flooding. Because these areas can be isolated and remain inundated by hazardous flooding for over two days, sheltering in place is not considered to be an appropriate primary or secondary flood response. These properties must therefore be evacuated before the evacuation routes are cut. Hence the need to consider flood risks to developments for the full range of flood events, beyond the 100-year flood.

 

It should also be noted that the State Emergency Services, as the responsible authority for emergency evacuation during floods, do not support council approving developments on such flood prone lands unless appropriate access for fail-safe evacuation of the entire population at risks of flooding is made available.  

 

Note: 100-year flood in this report refers to the 1% AEP flood, which has a 1% or 1 in 100 chance of occurring in any one year.

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 06

FILE NO:        331519.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Professional Development

 

Please address the following:

 

1.   Does the CEO think it would be worthwhile to engage an expert to run a session for Councillors on the costs of developments and on impacts policies may have in being able to deliver affordable housing?

 

The Question with Notice was included in the 11 December 2019 Council Agenda and a response was provided by the Chief Executive Officer at that meeting.

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 07

FILE NO:        331523.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - External Reports Commissioned by Council

 

Please address the following:

 

1.   Can Council provide a report on all external reports commissioned by Council from September 2016 to November 2019?

 

2.   Can all reports be made available to all Councillors on the Council Intranet?

 

The Question with Notice was included in the 11 December 2019 Council Agenda.  The matter was discussed by Council at that meeting and a motion was moved and carried.  Therefore a response to these questions are no longer required as officers will be actioning the resolution from the December meeting.


ITEM NO:       QWN 08

FILE NO:        331526.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - RMS Traffic Modelling

 

Please address the following:

 

On June 25th 2019 Liverpool City Council advised the Independent Planning Commission the RMS Modelling is being withheld and Liverpool City Council has not been supplied with the traffic modelling.

 

Only a week later on July 2nd 2019 the Road and Maritime Services advised the Independent Planning Commission it had supplied the traffic modelling to Liverpool City Council.

 

1.   Can Council confirm that the $3.4 million dollar traffic and transport study of the Moorebank / Liverpool region and the Terminals, performed by the NSW State Agency Road and Maritime Services has in fact been supplied to Liverpool City Council?

a)      If so, when it was supplied?

b)      Was the underpinning data set also supplied?

c)      What internal review process has been undertaken by Liverpool City Council since it was supplied?

d)      What if any external peer review has been sought by Liverpool City Council since it was supplied?

e)      Can Council obtain the underpinning data set for the mesoscopic modelling, if it was not supplied by Road and Maritime Services?

f)       Can Council provide a copy of the RMS Traffic report to all Councillors via email before, or at the December Council Meeting 2019?

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

                                               Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Harle

That Council:

1.      Immediately lodge a GIPA application with the RMS for the traffic modelling report  and take any follow up legal action necessary; and

 

2.      Write to the State and Federal Governments requesting an extension of exhibition time for Council and Councillors to be able to carry out their duties in accordance with the law.

 

Clr Hadchiti left the Chambers at 7.04pm.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion (Clr Hadchiti was not in the Chambers when the motion was voted on).

 

 

Clr Hadchiti returned at 7.06pm

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 09

FILE NO:        331530.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Harle - Access to GIPA Information Referred to in the Confidential Section at Council Meeting 20 November 2019

 

Please address the following:

 

1.   Council recently received numerous GIPA request for relevant documents relating to the Warwick Farm Racing Precinct that is now subject to an independent inquiry.

 

a)  What steps are necessary for Councillors to have a copy of those documents?

 

Response

 

The information supplied in response to the applications can be accessed by making an application under the GIPA Act.

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 10

FILE NO:        331540.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Harle - Refurbishment Costs of Council Buildings at Hoxton Park Road Complex

 

Please address the following:

 

1.   What were the total costs of refurbishing the Council buildings at Hoxton Park Road complex?

 

2.   What were the costs associated with moving the SES Unit from the Rose Street Depot to the Hoxton Park complex?

 

3.   What are the overall costs of accommodating the Men’s Shed in the previous SES accommodation at the Rose Street Depot?

 

Response

 

1.   What were the total costs of refurbishing the Council buildings at Hoxton Park Road complex?

 

The costs of Council refurbishing the Hoxton park Road building for its accommodation needs are as follows:

 

Refurbishment, rectification and repair work:                                    $940,000

(costs reflect significant repairs due to previous vandalism and theft from vacant building)

 

Future works – compliance to Australian Standards and Codes:    $750,000

 

 

2.   What were the costs associated with moving the SES Unit from the Rose Street Depot to the Hoxton Park complex?

 

In accordance with the Council resolution to relocate the SES Unit from the Rose Street Depot to Council’s Hoxton Park Road complex, the new SES Unit premises was designed and constructed in conjunction with the SES to meet their operation needs and allow for future growth.

 

The cost to construct the new SES premises at Hoxton Park Road was: $1,500,000.

 

The cost of relocation of the SES from Rose Street Depot to Hoxton Park Road was borne by the SES.

 

3.   What are the overall costs of accommodating the Men’s Shed in the previous SES accommodation at the Rose Street Depot?

 

As addressed in the Council meeting of 11 December 2019, Council resolved to allocate $120,000 for the upgrading/ refurbishment of the old SES premises at Rose Street Depot to accommodate the Men’s Shed.

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 11

FILE NO:        331542.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Harle - Parkbridge Estate

 

Please address the following:

1.   Did Council Staff attend the Movie Night function held on 30 November 2019?

2.   What was the function of Council Staff’s attendance?

3.   How and by whom was Council invited?

4.   Who authorised Council Staff to attend?

5.   How much did it cost Council?

6.   Could Council’s attendance be misinterpreted as supporting people opposed to the Town Centre proposal by attending and giving them additional information, support, and convenience to make a submission that Council does not offer to the broader residence in Middleton Grange?

 

Response

 

1.   Did Council Staff attend the Movie Night function held on 30 November 2019?

Yes. Two staff attended the event (Senior Strategic Planner and Community Engagement Officer) for one hour (between 5pm-6pm).

 

2.   What was the function of Council Staffs attendance?

At its meeting of 25 September 2019, Council resolved, amongst other things, to “undertake community consultation in conjunction with the assessment of an application and that the community consultation not overlap the December / January holiday period.” Two staff attended the event to conduct community consultation on the revised planning proposal for Middleton Grange town centre, as provided for by Council’s resolution.

 

3.   How and by whom was Council invited?

Council received an invitation to attend the event by the Chairperson of the Parkbridge Executive Committee.

 

4.   Who authorised Council Staff to attend?

Based on the Council resolution, the Director of City Economy & Growth accepted the invitation for Council staff to attend the event to undertake community consultation.

 

5.   How much did it cost Council?

 

The cost was limited to staff salary costs for the one hour of attendance at the event.

 

6.   Could Council’s attendance be misinterpreted as supporting people opposed to the Town Centre proposal by attending and giving them additional information, support, and convenience to make a submission that Council does not offer to the broader residence in Middleton Grange?

 

Community consultation of the planning proposal was authorised by Council resolution of 25 September 2019. Staff attending the event did not provide “additional information” to those attending the event. The information provided by staff was the same as that provided to those who attended the New Release/Established Areas Community Forum held at the Thomas Hassall Anglican College on 25 November 2019.

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 12

FILE NO:        331543.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadid - Briefing Session on the City Deal

 

Please address the following:

 

A couple of Council meetings ago, the CEO advised that the briefing session on the City Deal that was cancelled will be rescheduled.

 

  1. Has it been?

 

  1. Why was the initial one cancelled?

 

 

Response

 

The City Deal briefing was postponed due to an unavoidable diary clash that meant the CEO would not be in attendance. As the CEO has been the key officer in all City Deal meetings and negotiations, it was determined that she should be in attendance at a briefing in order to answer any questions. The briefing will be rescheduled as soon as possible.

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 13

FILE NO:        331546.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Ayyad - Civic Place

 

Please address the following:

 

1.   In relation to the proposed Civic Place, are there any updates on how the submission that Council Officers made to the UOW are going?

 

2.   Once a resolution is carried by Council, what does the Local Government Act state should happen?

 

Response

 

1.   In relation to the proposed Civic Place, are there any updates on how the submission that Council Officers made to the UOW are going?

 

In relation to Council and Built’s joint submission for University of Wollongong’s South Western Sydney Campus, University staff are still reviewing the various submissions and expect to short list the options mid-February 2020.

 

2.   Once a resolution is carried by Council, what does the Local Government Act state should happen?

           

Section 335 of the Local Government Act notes that, in relation to lawful decisions of the Council, they are to be implemented “without undue delay”.

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 14

FILE NO:        331549.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Balloot - Warwick Farm Precinct Economic Study

 

Please address the following:

 

Council commissioned a report regarding Warwick Farm Precinct Economic Study that Council Management had possession of in 2017:

 

1.   What were the findings of that report?

 

2.   Was this report ever shown to Councillors?

 

3.   And if not, can Councillors have a copy of that report?

 

Response

 

1.   What were the findings of that report?

 

Page iii, iv, and v of the AEC report outlines the key findings. These are:

 

Munday Street Precinct

 

The NSW Joint Regional Planning Panel approved a proposal by the Australian Turf Club (ATC) to develop part of the Warwick Farm Racecourse that will accommodate relocation of William Inglis and Son’s thoroughbred auctioneering facility from Randwick to construct a new state-of-the art $100m equine complex by 2018.

 

The new Equine Centre is expected to accommodate a multi-purpose selling area, parade areas, hospitality rooms and horse stabling facilities. There is also proposed a 4.5 star hotel on the site with 145 rooms and a range of hospitality facilities including a bar, gym, wellness centre, café and restaurants.

 

The new stabling facility at the Racecourse is estimated to be a $40m-$50m project, indicated to be the first of its kind in Australia (similar facilities understood to be operating in America and France). The ATC are understood to have plans to utilise value released from their landholdings at Munday Street Precinct (should the area be rezoned to permit higher density residential uses) as contribution to the new stabling facility project.

 

Whilst the Munday Street Precinct is currently operating as a defacto stabling precinct, this function could potentially shift to the racecourse in the future on completion of new stabling facilities. Survey findings from businesses, landowners and trainers in the Precinct indicate there is a highly favourable sentiment in the neighbourhood for rezoning the Precinct for alternative uses so long as suitable alternatives for horse stabling and related activity in close proximity to the Warwick Farm Racecourse is available.

 

The ATC proposal to develop horse stabling facilities at the Warwick Farm Racecourse could effectively meet the demand for stabling currently provided for in the Munday Street Precinct. The provision of this new stabling area on the racecourse would enable the economic contribution of the Munday Street Precinct to be retained in the Liverpool LGA, while also allowing for the Munday Street Precinct to be redeveloped for higher value land uses.

 

Lot 1 Governor Macquarie Drive (known as 240 Governor Macquarie Drive)

 

Large format retailers and commercial uses require certain features in order to be competitive and sustainable in the long term. Large format retailers require large sites which allow numerous retailers to co-locate and cluster. Office precincts require critical mass in order to facilitate the clustering of services amenity and transport access (public transport).

 

The Site is challenged on all of the above-mentioned fronts.

 

As a B5 zoned site, due to its modest scale and relative isolation, unless commitment from an anchor tenant can be found the Site will likely struggle to be competitive.

 

Generic feasibility analysis demonstrates that should the Site be rezoned to R4 High Density Residential, a minimum FSR of 1:1 is required for feasible residential unit development. The FSR is less compared to that which the planning proposal lodged for the Site proposes (FSR 3.5:1).

 

Priddle/Scrivener Street Precinct

 

The Precinct is generally well occupied, catering to a local service need. While manufacturing activity declined over the 2006-2011 period, the Precinct experienced growth in transport logistics and local service-based businesses.

 

Market investigations demonstrate the Precinct generally enjoys good market appeal. That said, the difficulty of access to and from the Precinct detracts from its central location within Liverpool and the South West region. If the issue of road access is left unaddressed, it is conceivable that market interest will decline over time as other locations that offer better vehicle access are available.

 

The Precinct has an important role to play in providing local urban services (i.e. mechanics and construction businesses) and facilitate urban logistics as market penetration for online retail continues to increase. As the population of Liverpool and the South West region grows, so too will the need for urban services to support the population’s needs.

 

Notwithstanding the importance of the Precinct’s role, key to the Precinct being sustainable in the long term will be implementation of the proposed Manning Street bypass that facilitates direct access to and from Governor Macquarie Drive.

Planning Scenario Analysis

 

Business-as-usual

 

In the Business-as-usual scenario, each component precinct within South Warwick Farm remains in their existing use. Implications for each of the precinct components are detailed:

 

·    Munday Street Precinct

 

This residential area (zoned R2) currently functions as a defacto horse stabling facility for horses who train and race at Warwick Farm Racecourse. Owing to its location just adjacent to the racecourse, it provides horse trainers with the close proximity required for training and racing.

 

Despite the valuable location of this precinct close to the racecourse, there are a number of safety concerns particularly with respect to horses commuting to and from the racecourse on roads shared with passenger vehicles, heavy trucks and pedestrians.

 

·    Lot 1 Governor Macquarie Drive

 

The site is relatively small in scale and offers limited opportunity for large format retailers to cluster/co-locate. Unless commitment from an anchor large format retail tenant can be secured, it is conceivable the Site will face market resistance owing to its less desirable location and site characteristics.

 

·    Priddle/Scrivener Street Precinct

 

The industrial precinct (currently zoned IN1) is not suited to large format industrial users as it does not provide unrestricted access for large trucks. Current road access is via narrow roads and through the residential/horse stabling area of Munday Street.

 

Notwithstanding the heavy vehicle access challenges, the Precinct continues to play an important role by accommodating service-based businesses as well as urban logistics businesses, both of whom respond to population growth.

 

Being an established industrial area (and with many older style buildings), it is conceivable that the Precinct will be at risk of being uncompetitive in time (as buildings age and road access continues to be challenged).

 

Potential Planning Interventions and Scenarios

 

Owing to the important role played by the Priddle/Scrivener Street industrial precinct, all planning scenarios envisage retention of the area for general industrial uses (i.e. retaining the IN1 General Industrial zone). Various planning interventions are considered for Munday Street Precinct and Lot 1 Governor Macquarie Drive.

 

Residential Uses

 

A rezoning of Munday Street Precinct and Lot 1 Governor Macquarie Drive to permit a mix of residential densities should be predicated on the ability of the horse stabling function to be relocated and accommodated on the Racecourse. This is important for three key reasons:

 

·    Economic contribution of horse stabling precinct

 

Economic modelling indicates the contribution Munday Street Precinct makes to the Liverpool LGA is significant - supporting 238 jobs (direct and indirect) and approximately $20.3m in Gross Regional Product each year, and paying $11.9m in wages and salaries.

 

A relocation of horse stabling to the racecourse would allow the economic contribution of Munday Street Precinct to be retained within the Liverpool LGA. Developing horse stables at the racecourse will result in the land being consumed and potential for development for alternative uses on the site being lost. Though, any potential opportunity costs associated with developing horse stables at the racecourse will be more than offset by the retention of horse stabling activities in Liverpool LGA and higher value uses available at Munday Street.

 

·    Viability of Warwick Farm Racecourse

 

Should the Munday Street Precinct be rezoned independent of the delivery of new horse stabling facility at the racecourse, there is a risk that utilisation rates at the racecourse will decline, thereby resulting in severe economic loss for the Liverpool LGA.

 

Many respondents to the survey indicated that availability of horse stabling facilities in close proximity to the racecourse is essential in their decision to continue training and racing at Warwick Farm.

 

·    Value released from rezoning

 

As a major landowner in Munday Street Precinct, it is understood that ATC plan to leverage value that may be released from its landholdings following a rezoning to permit higher density residential uses.

 

A critical requirement that underpins this scenario is implementation of alternate access to Priddle/Scrivener Street Precinct that bypasses the new residential area.

 

Residential and industrial uses do not mix. In order for both precincts to be viable and have market appeal, there needs to be provision for separate access and unimpeded access to the industrial precinct.

 

 

Existing-use values in Munday Street Precinct and Lot 1 Governor Macquarie Drive are at levels that facilitate even a modest increase in residential density. A rezoning to permit higher densities accompanies an opportunity for Council to require contributions to public benefit as part of a planning proposal. Contributions could include amenity and infrastructure items for the new residential precinct as well as to fund the Manning Street bypass.

 

While the rezoning of Lot 1 Governor Macquarie Drive would theoretically result in the ‘loss of employment land’, the nature of its location and scale makes it challenging to establish a viable cluster of large format retail uses. Potentially some local convenience retail and supporting commercial space could be considered at this location (intersection of Manning Street, Warwick Street and Munday Street) as part of wider masterplanning for a new residential precinct.

 

Employment Uses

 

A rezoning to facilitate employment uses at Munday Street Precinct to be sandwiched between two employment zoned areas - Lot 1 Governor Macquarie Drive (zoned B5) and Priddle/Scrivener Street Precinct (zoned IN1) is a logical land use scenario. Similar to the residential scenario, this scenario is predicated on the relocation of Munday Street Precinct’s horse stabling function to the racecourse.

 

A rezoning to employment uses would effectively eliminate any land use conflicts between the existing industrial, residential and horse stabling activities. There would accordingly be a less compelling case to progress and implement the Manning Street bypass.

 

In practical terms, this scenario is unlikely to result in meaningful outcomes on-ground as existing-uses (low density residential) are generally more valuable than potential B5 or IN1 lands. In the main, it is conceivable that most properties will remain in their existing use (potentially even retaining horse stabling), there being little incentive for landowners to change or redevelop. As a consequence, land use conflicts will arguably still present between existing residential uses and industrial uses at Priddle/Scrivener Street Precinct.

 

A bypass road solution could still be required to address safety risks and amenity issues. ‘New’ employment uses are unlikely to be able to contribute to public benefit considering there is unlikely to be any ‘value uplift’ to the lands in Munday Street Precinct, rather a value decrease.

 


 

Summary

 

The future of Lot 1 Governor Macquarie Drive is inextricably linked to the future of the Munday Street Precinct. Should the horse stabling functions of Munday Street Precinct be successfully and viably relocated to the racecourse, opportunities arise for Munday Street Precinct and Lot 1 to collectively deliver a masterplanned outcome incorporating a range of housing formats, required urban amenity and commercial support services, as well as meet social/community infrastructure need.

 

Despite the presence of the Warwick Farm train station, the Precinct (South Warwick Farm) is not currently planned to accommodate higher density residential uses. Comprehensive land use planning will be required to unlock the Precinct’s potential for a new community.

 

Resolution of road access and conflicts between different road users (residents and employment uses) is critical to ensuring any new residential community and the existing industrial precinct are viable and sustainable.

 

2.   Was this report ever shown to Councillors?

 

To inform the Warwick Farm Precinct Strategy, Council officers commissioned FloodMit Pty Ltd to prepare a preliminary flood assessment and the AEC Group (AEC) to prepare an economic and market assessment study.

 

The Council report to the 26 July 2017 Council meeting and its attachment (the draft Warwick Farm Precinct Strategy) both contained numerous references to the AEC study and extensive quotes directly from it.  No Councillor at that time requested a copy of the report or queried why it had not been provided in full.

 

At the time, copies of the flood and economic studies were not attached to the report because it was considered that focussed summaries and extracts of the key findings was a more effective way to report on their findings.

 

3.   And if not, can Councillors have a copy of that report?

 

A copy of the report was attached to this item of the Council Agenda.

 

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 15

FILE NO:        331554.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Edmondson Park Commuter Car Parking

 

Background

 

In July 2019 Council passed the following motion in regards to the Commuter Car Parking Crisis in Liverpool:

 

That Council write to the relevant Minister as well as the Premier reminding them of their commitment of providing commuter parking at Edmondson Park Train Station and request a firm timeframe of the delivery of such parking provisions.

 

Please address the following:

 

1.   Has a letter been sent to the Minister?

 

2.   Has a response been received by the Minister?

 

3.   If so, what was the response?

 

 

Response

 

1.   Has a letter been sent to the Minister?

            Yes, two letters were sent by Council dated 15 August 2019 to the Premier and to         the Minister for Transport and Roads. A copy of these letters were attached to this Item of the Council Agenda.

 

2.   Has a response been received by the Minister?

            Yes, a response was received by Council from Hon Gabrielle Upton MP,    Parliamentary Secretary to the Premier on behalf of the Premier dated 3 September         2019 and a response was received from Ms Eleni Petinos MP, Parliamentary    Secretary for Transport and Roads on behalf of the Minister for Transport and Roads dated 17 October 2019.

 

            The response letter from the Parliamentary Secretary to the Premier and the       response letter from the Parliamentary Secretary for Transport and Roads were          attached to this Item of the Council Agenda. The responses were included in the   Correspondence Register and in the CEO update sent to the Councillors on 24          October 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

3.   If so, what was the response?

            In summary, the response included the following paragraph the NSW Government      has committed to invest $40 million to deliver up to 700 additional commuter car          spaces at Edmondson Park Station. These spaces are on top of the 400 parking spots already available. This means that, once complete, there will be around 1,100       spaces available at the station. Transport for NSW has started planning for the new     commuter car park. While this will involve the investigation of complex issues, the             Minister has asked for this work to be prioritised. We will update the community on       the project as soon as more information is available”.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That Council:

 

1.    Welcomes any additional parking at Edmondson Park Station, but also expresses its disappointment that to date no work has taken place despite promises made by the Premier and the Member for Holsworthy in January 2019; and

 

2.    Write to the State Government and Federal Ministers requesting them to fast track funds for rail infrastructure in Western City.

 

Foreshadowed motion:      Moved: Clr Ayyad                 Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.      Welcomes any additional parking at Edmondson Park Station and Council also expresses the need for an increase in parking spaces at Edmondson Park Station; 

 

2.      Request the State Government to implement the proposal as quickly as possible noting that under Section 335 of the Local Government Act 1993, lawful decisions of the Council are to be implemented without undue delay; 

 

3.      Receive an update at the March 2020 Council meeting as to when these letters were sent out and copies of letters written to relevant Ministers in State Government provided; and

 

4.      Write to the State Government and Federal Ministers requesting them to fast track funds for rail infrastructure in Western City including the metro and the Leppington link to the Airport.

 

 

On being put to the meeting the motion (moved by Clr Hagarty) was declared LOST.

 

Division called (for the Motion moved by Clr Hagarty):  

 

Vote for:                      Deputy Mayor Karnib

                                     Clr Hagarty

                                     Clr Kaliyanda

                                     Clr Shelton

                                    

 

Vote against:               Clr Ayyad

                                      Clr Balloot

                                      Clr Hadchiti

                                      Clr Hadid

                                      Clr Harle

                                      Clr Rhodes

 

The Foreshadowed motion (moved by Clr Ayyad) then became the motion and on being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 16

FILE NO:        020162.2020

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Community Sport Infrastructure Grants

 

Please address the following:

 

1.   Did Council make any applications for the Federal Government's Community Sport Infrastructure Grants? 

 

2.   If so, what for and how much was requested?

 

A response to these questions will be provided in the 26 February 2020 Council meeting business papers.

 

 


Presentations by Councillors

 

Nil.

 

Clr Balloot left the Chambers at 7:30pm.

 

Clr Balloot returned to the Chambers at 7.34pm.

 

 

Notices of Motion

 

ITEM NO:       NOM 01

FILE NO:        021297.2020

SUBJECT:     Feral Cats and TNR Program

 

BACKGROUND

 

Complaints regarding the effects of feral cats on local wildlife, domesticated pets and quality of living of residents are frequently made by members of the community to Council and Councillors.

 

Thus far, attempts to ascertain which tier of government holds responsibility for this issue and work towards a satisfactory way to manage the concerns of residents and deal with the impacts of feral cats in the area have not been satisfactory.

 

Trap-neuter-release (TNR) programs are in place around Australia and across many other countries as a way of mitigating the impacts of feral cat populations in an ethical and humane way.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Kaliyanda)

 

That Council:

1.   Investigate the feasibility of developing a TNR program at Liverpool Animal Shelter;

2.   Involve local veterinarians and veterinary clinics in providing pro bono services to assist with the TNR program and rehoming of cats;

3.   Identify other organisations, i.e. the RSPCA, that may also be able to assist and add value to a local TNR program; and

4.   Consider other measures that can be undertaken within the LGA to mitigate the impacts of feral cats on the local community and provide a report back to Council by the May 2020 Council meeting.

 

 

COUNCIL DECISION.

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Hagarty

 

That Council:

1.     Investigate the feasibility of developing a TNR program at Liverpool Animal Shelter;

2.     Involve local veterinarians and veterinary clinics in providing pro bono services to assist with the TNR program and rehoming of cats;

3.     Identify other organisations, i.e. the RSPCA, that may also be able to assist and add value to a local TNR program;

4.     Consider other measures that can be undertaken within the LGA to mitigate the impacts of feral cats on the local community and provide a report back to Council by the May 2020 Council meeting;

 

5.       Write to relevant State Minister recommending that the State Government adopt legislation similar to the Western Australian Cat Act;

 

6.       Addresses with WSROC the opportunity for WSROC to advocate for a regional solution;

 

7.       Include in the LGA and LGNSW Conference Agenda a call for the Federal and State Government to provide funding to Council, to change the Companion Animal Act and provide Council funding to enable councils to enact the new measures to identify stray animals and non-registered cats as homeless and desex and house the cats until homes can be found in order to address feral cat plagues in urban areas; and

 

8.      Bring its No Kill Policy to the next Council meeting for its consideration and that the report include some measurement in terms of what neighbouring Councils do or what the standard is across NSW.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


ITEM NO:       NOM 02

FILE NO:        021320.2020

SUBJECT:     Bushfire Thank You

 

BACKGROUND

 

The entire nation has been moved by the unprecedented bushfire emergency.

I recently had the privilege of speaking to members from the Casula and Middleton RFS crews. When asked what the community could do to show their appreciation, one of the members remarked "we thrive on thank you".

 

The Liverpool community is proud of every one of its residents who have assisted in the emergency response, rescue and recovery effort. Let's come to together and give them the thank you they deserve.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Hagarty)

 

That Council hold a 'Thank you' BBQ for all of the volunteers and workers from the Liverpool LGA involved in the bushfire response, rescue and recovery effort.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Hadchiti

 

1.         That Council hold a 'Thank you' BBQ for all of the volunteers and workers from the Liverpool LGA involved in the bushfire response, rescue and recovery effort.

 

2.         That we use our social media channels to promote the RFS and how to become a volunteer in the RFS.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 


ITEM NO:       NOM 03

FILE NO:        021347.2020

SUBJECT:     No Injecting Room

 

BACKGROUND

 

Council and the community have previously expressed its strong opposition to medically supervised injecting facilities in Liverpool on a number of occasions.

 

In December last year, the journal ‘Current Issues in Criminal Justice’ published an article by two academics, George Christopher Dertadian & Stephen Tomsen, titled 'The case for a second safe injecting facility (SIF) in Sydney'. The article attempts to 'make the case' for a second injecting centre in Sydney’s Western or South Western Suburbs, with Liverpool listed as a potential location.

 

In the same week as that article was published, Deputy State Coroner Harriet Grahame, called for NSW Health and Liverpool Hospital to undertake a feasibility study into the establishment of a medically supervised injecting room within the grounds of Liverpool Hospital. The recommendation was made following Ms Grahame's inquest into the tragic 2015 death of a young man who overdosed in the toilets at Liverpool Hospital.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Hagarty)

That Council:

·    reaffirms

its strong opposition to a medically supervised injecting facility in the Liverpool LGA; and

support for drug rehabilitation services and programs.

·    acknowledges that domestic violence, homelessness and mental health are contributing factors to drug addiction.

·    notes that the NSW State Government is the level of Government responsible for the approval and establishment of medically supervised injecting facilities.

·    calls on the State Government to:

immediately rule out the establishment of a medically supervised injecting facility in the Liverpool LGA; and

boost funding to legal aid, domestic violence, homelessness and mental health services in the Liverpool LGA.

 

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

Foreshadowed motion:       Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council

 

  1. Note the NOM of the Council Meeting dated 12th October 2016 that I proposed which was not supported by the majority of Council being:

                  That Council:

 

1.    Reaffirms its position that it will never support a program that encourages the use of illicit drugs in our LGA.

 

2.    Writes to Mr Matt Noffs making it clear that an “ice” room is not welcome here.

 

3.    Support programs that encourage users to get off these deadly drugs rehabilitation centres).

 

4.     Writes to each State & Federal member that represent our LGA requesting their support to ensure no “ice” room is established in Liverpool noting that Melanie Gibbons MP has already made her position of no support clear.

 

  1. Strongly oppose a medically supervised injecting facility in the Liverpool LGA;

 

  1. Notes the State Government through the local member for Holsworthy previously ruled out support for the establishment of medically supervised injecting facilities in the Liverpool LGA;

 

  1. Notes The Drug Misuse and Trafficking Act 1985 only allowed for one supervised injecting facility licence in NSW to be issued, and a 2016 statutory review found there was insufficient need elsewhere to recommend changes to the act to add more;

 

  1. Notes The 2019-20 NSW Budget includes $1 billion in continued funding towards a range of homelessness and social and affordable housing programs;

 

 

 

 

  1. Notes The NSW Government committed new funding of $61 million over four years to implement the strategy, including:

 

a)      $20 million for social impact investment reducing exits from health institutions into homelessness.

 

b)      $10.7m for assertive outreach to support people sleeping rough, providing an end to end model with increased health capability.

 

c)      $10.6 million for sustaining tenancies support, by addressing complex needs such as mental health and drug and alcohol issues.

 

d)      $9.1 million for additional transitional accommodation.

 

e)      $6.2 million to expand the Staying Home Leaving Violence program to new locations.

 

f)       $4.7 million for universal risk screening and supports to respond early to young people at risk.

 

  1. Notes that in 2019-20 State Budget there is $20 million committed to homelessness programs and services in the South Western Sydney district (including Liverpool), including women’s and youth refuges. Non-government organisations (NGOs) are funded to deliver a range of services to support people who are experiencing homelessness or at risk of becoming homeless, including young people, families, single men, and single women, with or without children. Services may include outreach, case management, links to education and training, crisis and transitional accommodation;

 

  1. Notes that South Western Sydney Local Health District provides inpatient and community Mental Health services across the age range to the Liverpool area. Community services are provided by Liverpool and Fairfield community Mental Health teams, providing a range of services for people experiencing issues with their mental health and severe psychological distress. The mental health services are accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by calling 1800 011 511;

 

  1. Calls on the State Government to put a program in place to phase out the methadone clinics in the Liverpool LGA; and

 

  1. Through its social media platforms promote the service identified in point 8.

 

 

 

 

On being put to the meeting the motion (moved by Clr Hagarty) was declared LOST.

 

The Foreshadowed motion (moved by Clr Hadchiti) then became the motion and on being put to the meeting was declared CARRIED.

 

Division called (for the motion moved by Clr Hadchiti):

 

Vote for:           Deputy Mayor Karnib

                          Clr Ayyad

                          Clr Balloot

                          Clr Hadchiti

                          Clr Hadid

                          Clr Hagarty

                          Clr Harle

                          Clr Kaliyanda

                          Clr Rhodes

Vote against:   Clr Shelton

 

 


ITEM NO:       NOM 04

FILE NO:        021359.2020

SUBJECT:     Moorebank Intermodal

 

BACKGROUND

 

An application to modify Moorebank Precinct West was lodged over three and half years ago, in July 2016, prior to this term of Council. The modification application and the associated ‘staged development application’ for Moorebank Precinct West was determined and notified in November and December of 2019.

 

As stated by the NSW DPIE Notification the Staged Development for Moorebank Precinct West has merits appeal rights attached. This statutory notification made on December 9th 2019 triggered a 28-day deadline for appeal.

 

During the last Council meeting it was proposed off the floor that Council lodge an appeal in the courts.  Given the timing and information available at short notice, Council was not in a position to make an informed decision within the statutory limit of Jan 6th 2020.

 

A community advocacy group has lodged a Class 1 merits appeal before the statutory deadline and the first appearance has been set down for the 7th Feb 2020.

 

We now find ourselves able to join this action as the 2nd Applicant or provide financial and material support to the 1st Applicant.

 

At the time of Councillors deadline (28/01/2020 – 9.30am) to have motions in for the 5th February 2020 Council meeting, I still had some questions of the community group which I am awaiting answers.  These go to the scope of the case, the possible outcomes and cost estimates that ensure a case can be run in its entirety.

 

The purpose for now is to give all notice that pending the response, a motion may be moved to commit funding subject to statutory requirements or have Council join as the 2nd applicant.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Hadchiti)

 

That Council note that a motion may be moved to commit funding subject to statutory requirements or have Council join as the 2nd applicant.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

1          Continue to act on its promise and duty to do all it can to protect the safety and minimise any negative impacts the Intermodal may have on its ratepayers;

 

2          Note that RAID Moorebank Inc. did lodge a Class 1 merits appeal before the statutory deadline and the first appearance has been set down for the 7th February 2020;

 

3          Subject to the public exhibition requirements contained in s.356 of the Local Government Act 1993 and also subject to a case outline to be received from the resident group, Council consider allocating a financial amount of up to $300,000, subject to presentation of invoices, to fund legal fees and disbursements and expert witness costs relating to the Class 1 Appeal in the NSW Land and Environment Court by RAID Moorebank Inc. at the next Council meeting;

 

4          Advise RAID Moorebank Inc. that no funding is guaranteed and they currently progress this case at their own financial risk; and

 

5          Request the CEO to list this item on the Agenda for 26 February 2020 Council meeting for an update to Council on:

 

a)    Community feedback received at that point;

b)    Any issues; and

c)    What Council has received from RAID in relation to the prospects and what Council are trying to achieve in that case.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Division called: 

 

Vote for:           Deputy Mayor Karnib

                          Clr Ayyad

                          Clr Balloot

                          Clr Hadchiti

                          Clr Hadid

                          Clr Hagarty

                          Clr Harle

                          Clr Kaliyanda

                          Clr Rhodes

Vote against:   Clr Shelton

 

Deputy Mayor Karnib called a recess at 8.16pm.

 

 

 

The Council meeting resumed at 8.27pm with all Councillors present.

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Hadchiti

 

That Council move into Closed Session to consider CONF 01 – CONF 07 pursuant to the provisions of the Local Government Act 1993 shown below:

 

Item CONF 01 - EOI2910 Lurnea Affordable Housing Project and Item CONF 03 - WT2864 - Design and Construction of external lift at 3 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool are confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(d i) of the Local Government Act 1993 because they contain commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it;

 

Item CONF 02 - WT2805 - Whitlam Leisure Centre Indoor Pool Concourse: is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(d ii) of the Local Government Act 1993 because it contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council;

 

Item CONF 04 – Legal Affairs Report is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(g) of the Local Government Act 1993 because it contains advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege; and

 

Item CONF 05 - Proposed Acquisition of Lot 19 DP 17134, 36 Rickard Road, Chipping Norton under the Moorebank Floodway Voluntary Acquisition Scheme, item CONF 06 Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - 35 Scott Street, Liverpool and item CONF 07 Question with Notice - Clr Harle - Leasing of 33 Moore Street, Liverpool are confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993 because they  contain information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.


 

COUNCIL IN CLOSED SESSION

 

Confidential Items

ITEM NO:       CONF 01

FILE NO:        329294.2019

SUBJECT:     EOI2910 Lurnea Affordable Housing Project

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Hadchiti

 

That Council: 

1.     In accordance with Section 178(1) (b) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, declines to accept any of the Expression of Interest received for EOI2910 Lurnea affordable Housing Project;

 

2.     Makes public its decision regarding tender EOI2910 Lurnea Affordable Housing Project; and

 

3.     Bring a report to the March 2020 Council meeting with other possible land uses suitable for this parcel of land (options to be presented in a table format) and the value of the land.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Clr Shelton asked that his name be recorded as having voted against the motion. 

 


ITEM NO:       CONF 02

FILE NO:        005109.2020

SUBJECT:     WT2805 - Whitlam Leisure Centre Indoor Pool Concourse Refurbishment

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That Council:

 

1.    Declines to accept any of the tenders received for WT2805 – Whitlam Leisure Centre Indoor Pool Concourse Refurbishment in accordance with Section 178(1)(b) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

 

2.    In accordance with Section 178(3)(f) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, noting that Council is carrying out the requirements of the proposed contract itself.

 

3.    Makes public its decision regarding Tender WT2805 - Whitlam Leisure Centre Indoor Pool Concourse Refurbishment.

 

4.    Keeps confidential the details supplied in this report containing information on the submissions received, pursuant to the provisions of Section 10A(2)(d)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993 as it contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.

 

5.    Be supplied with a costing to:

a)    Soundproof and paint the exhibition hall; and

 

b)      Upgrade the electricity supply to the hall to be able to run the air conditioning unit and that a report with the above costings to be brought back to the March 2020 Council meeting.

 

Clr Ayyad retired from the meeting at 8.30pm.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 

Note: Clr Ayyad had retired from the meeting when this motion was voted on.

 


 

ITEM NO:       CONF 03

FILE NO:        006220.2020

SUBJECT:     WT2864 - Design and Construction of external lift at 3 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That Council:

1.   Retracts the Letter of Acceptance dated 30 October 2019 issued to All Tilt SLD Pty Ltd;

2.   Declines to accept any of the Tenders received for WT2864 - Design and Construction of an external lift at 3 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool in accordance with Section 178(1)(b) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005;

3.   In accordance with Section 178(3)(e) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, enters into negotiations with SD Civil with a view to entering into a contract for the same scope of works;

4.   In accordance with Section 178(4) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, notes that the reasons for entering into negotiations with SD Civil and not calling fresh tenders are:

a)   SD Civil is a subsidiary of the same parent SD Group as was All Tilt and will deploy the same resources and subcontractors as per All Tilt’s offer;

b)   Based on the evaluation of all the tenders, All Tilt provided the most advantageous offer to Council and negotiations will allow Council to evaluate SD Civil’s capacity to provide the same offer;

c)   SD Civil is the only tenderer offering a lift that is uniform with the other lifts that are being provided across Council’s other facilities. This will enable cost-effective long-term operations and maintenance arrangements to be established for Council’s entire portfolio of lifts; and

d)   Inviting fresh tenders at this stage for the same scope of works is not expected to result in any significant benefits considering time delays and additional costs associated with a new tender process.

 

 

 

5.   Notes that should the negotiations disclose any uncertainty regarding SD Civil’s ability to undertake the required works or any material change to the original offer, fresh tenders will be invited for these works;

6.   Makes public its decision regarding Tender WT2864 Design and Construction of an External Lift for 3 Hoxton Park Road;

7.   Notes that the Chief Executive Officer will finalise all details and sign the Letter of Acceptance for the tender, giving it contractual effect, in accordance with delegated authority; and

8.   Keeps confidential the details supplied in this report containing information on the submissions received, pursuant to the provisions of Section 10A(2)(d)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993 as it contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 

Note: Clr Ayyad had retired from the meeting when this item was voted on.


ITEM NO:       CONF 04

FILE NO:        009668.2020

SUBJECT:     Legal Affairs Report

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadid                 Seconded: Clr Balloot

 

That Council receives and notes the report concerning the legal affairs of Liverpool City Council.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.


ITEM NO:       CONF 05

FILE NO:        010775.2020

SUBJECT:     Proposed Acquisition of Lot 19 DP 17134, 36 Rickard Road, Chipping Norton under the Moorebank Floodway Voluntary Acquisition Scheme

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Hadchiti

 

That Council:

 

1.     Approves the acquisition of Lot 19 DP 17134, 36 Rickard Road, Chipping Norton under the provisions of the Moorebank Voluntary Acquisition Scheme for the price and terms outlined in this report;

 

2.     Upon settlement of the acquisition, classifies Lot 19 DP 17134, 36 Rickard Road, Chipping Norton as ‘Community’ land;

 

3.     Keeps confidential this report pursuant to the provisions of Section 10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993 as this information would, if disclosed confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business; and

 

4.     Authorises its delegated officer to execute any documents, under Power of Attorney necessary to give effect to this decision.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.  

 


ITEM NO:       CONF 06

FILE NO:        331553.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - 35 Scott Street, Liverpool

 

Please address the following:

 

Council is currently leasing floor space at 35 Scott Street, Liverpool.

 

1.   To date what is the overall cost of leasing that space?

 

2.   When did the lease start?

 

3.   What is the ongoing monthly leasing cost?

 

4.   Is the whole leased area being occupied?

 

 

Responses to these questions were provided to Councillors and discussed in confidential session.

 


ITEM NO:       CONF 07

FILE NO:        331532.2019

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Harle - Leasing of 33 Moore Street, Liverpool

 

Please address the following:

 

1.   What is the annual leasing income from space within 33 Moore Street?

 

2.   What were the overall costs of moving Council staff from 33 Moore Street to the refurbished buildings at the Hoxton Park Road complex?

 

 

Responses to these questions were provided to Councillors and discussed in confidential session.


 

 

THE MEETING CLOSED AT 9.04pm.

 

 

<Signature>

Name: Ali Karnib

Title:    Deputy Mayor

Date:   26 February 2020

I have authorised a stamp bearing my signature to be affixed to the pages of the Minutes of the Council Meeting held on 5 February 2020. I confirm that Council has adopted these Minutes as a true and accurate record of the meeting.

    


1

Ordinary Meeting

26 February 2020

Chief Executive Officer Report

 

 

CEO 01

Biannual Progress Report - July-December 2019

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

029349.2020

Report By

Hiba Soueid - Manager Corporate Strategy and Performance

Approved By

Andrew Stevenson - Chief Strategy and Engagement Officer

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Biannual Progress Report provides an overview of Council’s performance against the Principal Activities that were scheduled for the July to December 2019 period in the Delivery Program and Operational Plan 2019-20.

 

This is the first progress report for 2019-20 and has been prepared in line with the Office of Local Government Integrated Planning and Reporting Guidelines.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council notes and receives the Biannual Progress Report which outlines the progress of the actions detailed in the Delivery Program and Operational Plan 2019-20.

 

 

REPORT

 

On 26 April 2017, Council adopted the Community Strategic Plan Our Home, Liverpool 2027.

 

Our Home, Liverpool 2027 outlines the community’s vision and priorities for Liverpool. The Plan was developed after extensive engagement with the community and contains four key directions for the future of Liverpool. These directions guide Council’s operations and services for the next ten years.

 

Council’s four-year Delivery Program 2017-2021 and one-year Operational Plan and Budget 2019-2020 outline Council’s commitment to the community. The combined document details the Principal Activities that Council plans to deliver towards achieving the community vision that has been outlined in Our Home, Liverpool 2027.

 

Upon adoption of the four-year Delivery Program 2017-2021 and one-year Operational Plan 2019-2020 in June 2019, Council determined to deliver 107 actions (Principal Activities).

 

Section 404(5) of the Local Government Act 1993 requires the Chief Executive Officer to ensure that a progress report is provided to Council at least every six months. It should include an update on the principal activities that have been detailed in the four-year Delivery Program. This allows Councillors and the community to monitor Council’s progress. The attached report contains an update on the delivery of these for the July to December 2019 period.

 

Highlights of this period include the re-opening of Bigge Park Water Playground, Liverpool

Sculpture Walk, 2019 Western Sydney International (Nancy Bird-Walton) Airport Minecraft

competition, Fifteenth Avenue upgrade and milestone events including the 25th anniversary

of Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre and 20 years of Liverpool Youth Council.

 

All the 107 Principal Actions that Council is undertaking for the 2019-20 financial year are on track.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

To deliver Council services within approved budget.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Undertake communication practices with the community and stakeholders across a range of media.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

As per the Local Government Act (1993) Section 404 (5), Council must ensure regular progress reports are provided to the Council reporting as to its progress with respect to the principal activities detailed in its delivery program at least every six months.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Biannual Progress Report - July-December 2019 (Under separate cover)   


1

Ordinary Meeting 26 February 2020

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 01

Developer Contributions - instalment payments for secondary dwellings

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

324661.2019

Report By

Shaun Beckley - Manager, Infrastructure Planning

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

 Executive Summary

 

At its meeting on 11 December 2019, Council resolved to develop:

 

“a policy that allows 7.11 payments on secondary dwellings to be paid in instalments with instalment 1, 50% on the issue of a Construction Certificate and instalment 2 being 50% prior to any Occupation Certificate (OC) being issued (interim and final).

 

The purpose of this report is to facilitate changes to enact this resolution and clarify the relationship between complying development certificates and contributions.

 

Secondary Dwellings

 

Secondary dwellings are a form of low cost housing that can be added to a property with an existing dwelling. They provide opportunity to house existing residents of the property, downsize for friends and relatives or provide commercial opportunity for the property owner. The resolution of Council seeks to provide flexibility to existing residents providing additional accommodation for family members.

 

The addition of a secondary dwelling in the rear yard of an existing dwelling typically occurs within the established areas of existing suburbs,  covered Liverpool Contributions Plan 2018 – Existing Areas (CP2018).

 

CP2018 provides the framework for payment, including the stage in the development process where contributions need to be paid. The current framework does not provide the flexibility to accept instalment payments. CP2018 therefore needs to be updated to include a provision that allows instalment payments as outlined in the previous resolution of Council.

 

The change to CP2018, though minor in nature, requires a formal amendment to deliver the benefits anticipated by Council’s resolution. As such, this report recommends the necessary changes to enable instalment payments.

 

 

 

 

Complying Development Certificates

 

Secondary dwellings can be approved as a development application by Council or a complying development certificate by Council or a private certifier. Some minor amendments are required to the administration section of the CP2018 to ensure that the relationship between CDC and contributions is clear and certifiers understand their obligations.

 

It is noted that Council cannot allow for payment by instalment for development approved by a CDC, as provisions regarding payment of contributions are set by the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

 

If supported by Council, the amendment to CP 2018 will be placed on public exhibition in accordance with the provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and the Regulations.

 

If any submissions are received opposing the changes, a report will be submitted to Council following exhibition. If no such submissions are received, the CEO could finalise the update to CP 2018.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Resolve to exhibit draft Liverpool Contributions Plan 2018 – Established Areas (Amendment 1) on public exhibition in accordance with the requirements of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and regulations; and

 

2.    Delegate to the CEO authority to finalise Liverpool Contributions Plan 2018 – Established Areas (Amendment 1) if no submissions opposing the changes are received.

 

 

REPORT

 

Secondary dwellings, often referred to as granny flats, provide an important housing option within our existing communities. They represent the ability of residents to down size within their existing communities, provide additional accommodation for existing residents of the property or as a commercial rental opportunity.

 

A contribution plan (CP) provides a mechanism for Council to obtain funding to provide infrastructure to meet the increase in demand associated with new development. This infrastructure often takes the form of existing park upgrades and storm water upgrades.

 

Council currently levies contributions on secondary dwellings under two CPs:

·    Liverpool Contributions Plan 2018 – Established Areas

·    Liverpool Contributions Plan 2014 – Austral and Leppington North Precincts


 

The following question with notice was considered by Council at its meeting of 11 December 2019:

 

What legal or other impediments are there to allowing the payment of contributions in instalments for those who can exhibit limited financial means?

 

Council subsequently resolved:

 

That Council develops a policy that allows 7.11 payments on secondary dwellings to be paid in instalments with instalment 1, the option of paying 50% being on the issue of a Complying Development Certificate (CDC) and instalment 2 being 50% prior to any Occupation Certificate (OC) being issued (interim and final).

 

The provision of a secondary dwelling as an addition to an existing dwelling most commonly occurs within established suburbs covered by CP2018. At present, CP 2018 does not provide the ability to pay contributions in instalments.

 

The Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, and the Regulations, do not prevent Council from specifying payment of contributions in instalments for DAs. As such, Council do not need to develop a further policy (as resolved by Council), rather update the CPs to allow instalment payments.

 

An overview of the key changes proposed to CP 2018 are detailed below. A marked-up version of CP2018 is included as an attachment to this report.

 

No.

Proposed Change

Comment

1

Insert new text:

 

Adoption of Plan

 

Amendment 1 applies to any application determined after the date on which the amendment came into effect.

 

Details when these specific provisions will commence.

2

Replace existing text:

 

Timing of payment of the contributions

Monetary contributions are required to be paid to Council:

a)   for development approved as a development application, prior to the issuing of the Construction Certificate; or

b)   for development approved as a complying development certificate, prior to the commencement of works,

whether by Council or a Private Certifier.

 

Clarifies when the payment of contributions is required, regardless of application type (DA, CC, CDC) and approval authority (Council, Private Certifier).

3

Insert new text:

If a development application for a secondary dwelling is approved by Council , the payment of contributions may be made in the following instalments:

a)   50% prior to the issue of approval of a Construction Certificate; and

b)   50% prior to the issue of an Occupation Certificate

 

Enacts Council’s resolution to allow instalment payments. This change impacts DA approvals issued by Council.

 

 

4

Replace heading and insert new text:

CDC, CC and the obligation of accredited certifiers

In accordance with Cl 136L of the EP&A Regulation 2000, a certifying authority must not issue a complying development certificate for work unless it has included a condition requiring payment of contributions prior to commencement of work.

 

 

Reinforces the requirement of private certifiers to include a condition of consent requiring payment of contributions prior to the commencement of works, in accordance with the provisions of the EP&A Regulations.

 

Note: The Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 mandates that for Complying Development Certificates, contribution payments are required prior to the commencement of work. Clause 136L of the Regulation is provided for your information:

 

(1)  A complying development certificate issued subject to a condition required by section 4.28(9) of the Act must be issued subject to a condition that the contribution or levy must be paid before any work authorised by the certificate commences.

(2)  Subclause (1) applies despite any provision to the contrary in the council’s contributions plan.

 

As such, Council’s desire to enable instalment payments cannot be extended to include secondary dwellings approved under a Complying Development Certificates.

 

The effect of these changes, as stipulated previously, is to enable instalment payments for contributions on secondary dwelling approvals. Apart from delivering on this outcome, it is anticipated that there will be no other impact associated with the changes.

 

 

If supported by Council, CP 2018 (incorporating Amendment 1) will be placed on public exhibition in accordance with the requirements of the EP&A Act and Regulations. If required, a report will be submitted to Council providing an overview of the exhibition period and any objections made.

 

If no objections are received during the public exhibition period, it is recommended that Council delegate to the CEO the ability to finalise the draft Plan. In this circumstance, Councillors will be informed through the CEO update.

 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Facilitate economic development.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Regulate for a mix of housing types that responds to different population groups such as young families and older people.


Civic Leadership

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Liverpool Contributions Plan 2018 Established Area (Amendment 1) draft for exhibition (Under separate cover)  


1

Ordinary Meeting

26 February 2020

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 02

Post Exhibition Report - Draft Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 (Amendment 25)

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

003604.2020

Report By

Graham Matthews - Senior Strategic Planner

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At its 20 October 2019 meeting, Council resolved to re-exhibit draft Liverpool Development Control Plan (LDCP) 2008 (Amendment 25) for 28 days and that a briefing be arranged for Councillors during the exhibition period. Council also resolved to receive a further report on the outcomes of public exhibition.

 

Amendment 25 amends Parts 1 and 4 of LDCP 2008 to make the DCP consistent with changes made to Liverpool Local Environmental Plan (LLEP) 2008 by the Liverpool City Centre LEP amendment (Amendment 52).

 

Public exhibition of Amendment 25 was undertaken between 6 November and 4 December 2019. One submission was received from Endeavour Energy. An internal submission was also received from Council’s Floodplain and Water Management department. In addition, a briefing was held for Councillors on 26 November 2019 and a presentation was made to the Liverpool Design Excellence Panel (DEP) on 14 November 2019.

 

Matters raised in the submissions and by Councillors are addressed in the body of the report.

 

This report recommends that the minor amendment to Section 6 of Part 1 of the DCP proposed by Council’s Floodplain and Water Management department be incorporated. Otherwise, this report recommends that Amendment 25 to the LDCP be adopted without further amendment. It is also recommended that the CEO be authorised to finalise the amendment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Adopts draft Amendment 25 to the Liverpool Development Control Plan (Part 1 and Part 4) (Attachment 1 and 2) and authorises the Chief Executive Officer to finalise Amendment 25 including the correction of any minor typographical errors to come into effect upon the publication of the required notice in the local newspaper; and

 

2.    Notifies those who lodged a submission of Council’s decision.

 

 

REPORT

Background

 

At its 29 March 2017 meeting, Council resolved to authorise the CEO to finalise LDCP (Amendment 25), once the Liverpool city centre LEP amendment, LLEP 2008 (Amendment 52) was finalised by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE). However, in finalising LLEP 2008 (Amendment 52), DPIE made changes to the LEP amendment, which necessitated the re-drafting of Part 4 LDCP 2008, to make it consistent with Amendment 52 as gazetted by DPIE.

 

At its 20 October 2019 meeting, Council resolved to re-exhibit draft Liverpool Development Control Plan (LDCP) 2008 (Amendment 25) for 28 days and that a briefing be arranged for Councillors during the exhibition period. Council also resolved to receive a further report on the outcomes of public exhibition.

 

Consistent with the requirements of Clause 21A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000, the redraft of Part 4 of LDCP 2008 was also referred to the Liverpool Design Excellence Panel (DEP) for consideration. A briefing was held with the Panel on 14 November 2019.

Public exhibition

 

Public exhibition commenced on 6 November 2019 and concluded on 4 December 2019. Two submissions were received, one from Endeavour Energy and the other from Council’s Floodplain and Water Management department. Copies of Part 1 and Part 4 of the LDCP (with tracked changes incorporating recommended amendments) are included in Attachment 1 and Attachment 2 respectively.

Endeavour Energy submission  

 

Endeavour Energy requested that the Council reconsider controls in Sections 4.2.5 and 4.3.6 of Part 4 of LDCP 2008, which require that:

·    Electricity substations … must be properly integrated into the building design to minimise disruption and visual clutter in the ground plane and streetscape (Section 4.2.5, control 3, subsection k); and

·    Electricity substations (where required) shall be situated within the building or its basement (Section 4.3.5, control 4).

 

The Endeavour Energy submission states that Endeavour Energy prefers the use of pad-mount substations, constructed outside buildings, often in the public domain. Nevertheless, the Endeavour Energy submission also notes that, “this may leave limited opportunity for landscaping or screening or adoption of prudent avoidance principles”. It goes on to note that, “The utilisation of indoor substations where appropriate may help ensure quality urban outcomes across the Liverpool city centre.”

 

While external pad-mount substations are the preference of Endeavour Energy, the submission makes clear that Council may prefer that substations are incorporated into the building design to ensure quality urban outcomes across the city centre. Referral of specific Development Applications to Endeavour Energy would continue to occur, pursuant to the requirements of State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007, giving Endeavour Energy the opportunity to comment on a particular development.

 

Council has requested a meeting with senior staff at Endeavour Energy to discuss how we may collaborate to ensure the need for additional substations do not compromise quality public realm in Liverpool city centre.

 

It is recommended that no changes to this Clause be made.

Councillor Briefing

 

As required by the Council resolution of 20 October 2019, a briefing was held for Councillors on 26 November 2019. Councillors were briefed in detail on the proposed amendments to Part 4 of the DCP. Questions raised and the response is detailed in the Summary and Response to Submissions table (Attachment 3).

 

Some Councillors raised concern about the lack of parking in the Liverpool CBD and requested consideration be given to increasing requirements for on-site parking in the Liverpool city centre, to account for perceived higher use of cars in the community.

 

It was advised in the briefing that:

 

·    Minimum parking rates, for developments in the Liverpool city centre on land zoned B3 Commercial Core or B4 Mixed Use are determined by Clause 7.3 of LLEP 2008 and that under the Environmental Planning and Assessment (EP&A) Act 1979, provisions of a DCP may not contradict those of an LEP;

 

·    Section 3J of the Apartment Design Guidelines (ADG), prepared in accordance with State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) 65, reduces the requirement for on-site parking for buildings developed within 800m of a metropolitan railway station. This provision takes precedence over parking rates in the LLEP 2008 and LDCP 2008; and

·    Most residential flat buildings and mixed-use buildings in the Liverpool City Centre are within 800m of either Liverpool or Warwick Farm railway station and are therefore subject to reduced parking requirements.

 

The DCP must be consistent with the provisions of the LEP and SEPP 65. It is therefore recommended that no changes to this Clause be made.

Liverpool Design Excellence Panel

 

The redraft of Part 4 LDCP 2008 was provided to the DEP on 8 November 2019, pursuant to the requirements of Clause 21A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000. A detailed briefing was provided to the DEP on 14 November 2019. The DEP did not provide any comments on the DCP changes and therefore no changes have been proposed.

 

Council submission

 

The submission from Council’s Floodplain and Water Management department proposes minor amendments to Section 6 of Part 1 of the DCP - Water Cycle Management, including subsections 6.1, 6.4 and 6.5. The minor amendments seek to achieve consistency throughout the DCP to encourage the harvest of rainwater and urban stormwater run-off, where appropriate, and to clarify requirements for the disposal of pumped stormwater to Council’s stormwater pits. Full details of the proposed amendments are included in the Summary and Response to Submissions document (Attachment 3).

 

The proposed amendments increase the clarity and functionality of the DCP. It is recommended that these proposed amendments to Part 1 LDCP 2008 be adopted.

Conclusion

 

Finalisation of Draft LDCP 2008 (Amendment 25) will update the Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008, to make it consistent with LLEP 2008 (Amendment 52). The amended DCP will provide accurate guidance to those wishing to redevelop property in the Liverpool City Centre, in particular those wishing to take advantage of the development bonuses afforded by Clause 7.5A of LLEP 2008.

 

It is recommended that Council adopt the changes to Part 1 and 4 of the DCP and authorises the Chief Executive Officer to finalise Amendment 25 including the correction of any minor typographical errors to come into effect upon the publication of the required notice in the local newspaper.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Facilitate economic development.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Regulate for a mix of housing types that responds to different population groups such as young families and older people.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Part 1 DCP (with post exhibition amendments) (Under separate cover)

2.         Part 4 DCP (as exhibited) (Under separate cover)

3.         Summary and Response to submissions (Under separate cover)  


1

Ordinary Meeting

26 February 2020

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 03

Report on Implementation Strategy for Smoke-Free Areas

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Manage the community’s disposal of rubbish

File Ref

004624.2020

Report By

Vi Girgis - Senior Officer City Precinct

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Following a series of Council resolutions in 2018 regarding smoking in Liverpool, in 2019 Council implemented a strategy to raise awareness about current smoke-free areas throughout Liverpool. The strategy was implemented over 12 months, starting in January 2019.

 

This report is presented to outline the results of the twelve-month implementation strategy.

 

The main outcomes of the strategy are:

1.   Signage at smoke-free zones throughout the Liverpool city centre were updated

2.   A media and education campaign regarding smoke-free zones was delivered

3.   Cigarette butt litter is still an issue throughout the Liverpool city centre

4.   Intercept surveys reveal support for the city centre to be smoke-free

5.   Council staff are investigating available Australian grants for cigarette butt litter mitigation

6.   Upgrade of bins in Macquarie Mall has been effective in preventing their damage by cigarette butt litter

7.   Voluntary smoking zones are not feasible in Liverpool

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

REPORT

 

1.       BACKGROUND

 

At the Council meeting of 12 December 2018, Council endorsed the Implementation Strategy for Smoke-Free Areas, which included the following:

1.   An audit of signage at playgrounds in the Liverpool LGA, and at public transport stops in the Liverpool CBD, including No Smoking areas in Macquarie Mall;

 

2.   Production and installation of ‘No Smoking’ signage where required, as per the audit;

 

3.   A media campaign to educate the community to raise awareness of smoke-free areas in Liverpool;

 

4.   Education campaign undertaken by Council rangers, who spoke with the public about smoke-free zones throughout the city centre;

 

5.   Cigarette butt counts undertaken by city cleansing staff;

 

6.   Regular intercept surveys at smoke-free areas, seeking community feedback;

 

7.   Regular internal reviews of the strategy’s progress;

 

8.   Makes application in June 2019 to the EPA Cleaner Cities Grant;

 

9.   Replaces rubbish bins in the mall that have been damaged by the butting of cigarette butts on their tops with a suitable material not susceptible to butt damage;

 

10. Investigate costs for installing butt bins with suitable signage alongside rubbish bins to stop future damage of the rubbish bins, and a report on these costs be submitted to Council; and

 

11. Undertake investigations into possible suitable sites, costs and implementation of voluntary smoking zones. Following the 12-month implementation of the strategy, Council requested a report on outcomes, community feedback and recommendations.

 

2.       OUTCOMES OF IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

 

2.1     Signage

Council staff undertook an audit of ‘No Smoking’ signage at smoke-free zones legislated by the Smoke-free Environment Act 2000, with the exception of ‘within 4 metres of a pedestrian access point to a public building’. Sites audited were playgrounds in the Liverpool LGA, public transport stops in the Liverpool CBD, and Macquarie Mall. ‘No Smoking’ signage was placed at all these sites.

 

2.2     Media campaign

Council created a community education campaign to raise awareness of smoke-free areas in Liverpool. The campaign included a media release, mentions in the Mayor’s message in the local newspaper, social media posts, and on the Macquarie Mall urban screen.

 

2.3     Education campaign

Council created postcards with information regarding smoke-free zones and quit smoking resources. Every week, Council rangers would visit one of 23 smoke-free zones throughout the Liverpool city centre to speak with any smokers in these areas. Smokers were informed of what smoke-free zones were, and were provided with the postcards for further information. Throughout the year, 21 smokers were spoken with and given postcards. The low number of smokers at these areas could be an indication of general public adherence to ‘No Smoking’ signage, and/or general public avoidance of speaking with Council rangers.

 

2.4     Cleansing campaign

Throughout the year, city cleaners visited the smoke-free zones and their surrounds to undertake cigarette butt counts. The results vary broadly at each site, which could be indicative of a number of factors, including concentration of pedestrian traffic through, and visitation to the site, and whether the environment is conducive to lingering. For example, Apex and Bigge parks tended to have more cigarette butts, due to higher numbers of people spending longer amounts of time in them, whereas bus stops along busy strips, such as Bigge and Moore streets had less cigarette butts. Overall, cleaners report that cigarette butts are still an issue throughout the city centre, particularly in high pedestrian and visitor areas such as Macquarie Mall.

 

2.5     Intercept surveys

Throughout the year, Council staff undertook intercept surveys at the smoke-free zones every two months. Most people who were approached refused to be surveyed, and those who agreed to be surveyed were generally non-smokers. Smokers were also approached, but the majority refused to be surveyed. Staff were able to get responses from 27 people. The results are as follows:

 

(a)  Were you aware that smoking is not permitted in areas such as parks, playgrounds, bus stops and taxi stops?

Yes – 19

No – 8

 

(b)  Do you support the Liverpool city centre becoming non-smoking?

Yes – 17

No – 10

 

(c)  Where do you support designated smoking areas in the city centre be located?

‘Not sure’/’Don’t know’ – 6

Away from kids – 5

Answers also included: in a park (but away from kids), have one designated ‘smoking café’, near carparks, and only on private property.

 

 

(d)  Any other comments (a selection of responses):

- Have designated smoking areas so non-smokers know not to go there. I don’t like when smokers are in my face

- More laws and education about smoking, more regulation and enforcement

- People regularly smoke in buses and at bus stops regardless of the rules

- Should be allowed to smoke wherever

- It is dangerous for other people’s health. There needs to be more strict rules around it and they [smokers] should have a designated spot to not be near other people who don’t smoke

- There are too many cafes with smokers. I want to go out with my family because I live in a unit, to get some fresh air. But the air is all polluted by smokers, so there is nowhere to eat and get fresh air

- It would feel isolating if there is a designated spot [smoking area]

- Smokers have rights too

- I am a smoker but I think Liverpool should ban smoking in the CBD

- People don’t realise that kids are around and you shouldn’t smoke near kids. I would prefer they didn’t smoke at cafés so I could have a meal with my family

- Smokers should be more considerate of kids. There are cigarette butts all over the kids’ playground and kids pick it up.

 

2.6     Grant

The EPA Cleaner Cities Grant is a grant of the Environmental Protection Agency of the USA. Council staff will investigate available grants in Australia suitable to the prevention and mitigation of cigarette butt litter.

 

2.7     Bins

At the Council meeting of 27 February 2019, Council resolved to update the 14 bins in Macquarie Mall with the following:

·    Replace bin lid roofs;

·    Replace bin lids;

·    Install ash boxes on the sides of bins; and

·    Install new signage on bins, drawing attention to ash boxes.

This was completed at a total cost of $23,221 (inc GST).

 

After almost one year of implementation, it has been observed that the new bin lids and ash boxes have been effective in preventing cigarette butt damage to bins.

 

2.8     Voluntary smoking zones

Council staff investigated the feasibility of establishing voluntary smoking zones throughout the city centre. Staff conducted surveys, undertook desktop research, consulted internally and with NSW Health during the investigation.

 

There was some support for voluntary smoking zones by community members who were surveyed, noting that most people who were surveyed were non-smokers.

 

The response from internal and external subject matter experts is that voluntary smoking zones do not work in general, and will not work in Liverpool specifically. This is because the overwhelming body of experience from regulatory and health professionals is that for restrictions on smoking to be effective, they have to be enforceable, and to be enforceable, they have to be mandatory rather than voluntary.

 

Liverpool has above-average rates of smoking which may contribute additional resistance to increasing smoke free areas. There is a scarcity of evidence regarding the effectiveness of voluntary smoking zones.  The first key recommendation of the World Health Organisation report on the global tobacco epidemic, 2009: implementing smoke-free environments states: ‘Legislation that mandates completely smoke-free environments – not voluntary policies – is necessary to protect public health.’ Furthermore, the report’s final key recommendation states that, ‘Physically separating smokers from non-smokers (for example by establishing designated smoking rooms) or providing ventilation of smoking areas does not eliminate the health risk resulting from exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke.’

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Act as an environmental leader in the community.

Undertake communication practices with the community and stakeholders across a range of media.

Foster neighbourhood pride and a sense of responsibility.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

Smoke-free Environment Act 2000, NSW Government

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

26 February 2020

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 04

Post Exhibition Report - Draft Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 78) and Draft Liverpool Development Control Plan (Amendment 35) - land subject to Basin 14 and Bernera Road, Edmondson Park

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Create a dynamic, inclusive environment, including programs to support healthy living

File Ref

028362.2020

Report By

Masud Hasan - Senior Strategic Planner

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At its meeting on 26 June 2019, Council resolved:

 

That Council:

 

1.   Notes the advice of the Liverpool Local Planning Panel;

2.   Supports in principle the planning proposal to amend the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 to rezone land and amend development standards for certain land subject to proposed Basin 14 and Bernera Road, Edmondson Park;

3.   Supports in principle the amendments to the Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008, including a review of whether the left-hand deceleration from Camden Valley Way into Bernera Road can be lengthened;

4.   Notes the need to undertake a revised stormwater drainage plan to minimise the harmful and negative effects of open drains and channel systems;

5.   Delegates to the CEO to make any typographical or other editing amendments to the planning proposal and Development Control Plan if required;

6.   Forwards the planning proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment pursuant to Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, seeking a Gateway determination;

7.   Subject to Gateway determination, undertake public exhibition and community consultation for both the planning proposal and Development Control Plan in accordance with the conditions of the Gateway determination; and

8.   Receive a further report on the outcomes of public exhibition and community consultation

 

A planning proposal (Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 Draft Amendment No. 78) was prepared and submitted to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for a Gateway determination as required by resolution point 2.

 

To support the planning proposal an amendment to the Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 Part 2.11 Land Subdivision and Development in Edmondson Park (Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 Draft Amendment No. 35) was prepared as required by resolution point 3. Minor editing amendments to road layout figures in the DCP (Figures 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 22, 24, 25) were undertaken following Council’s resolution and prior to public exhibition due to a mapping error showing a cul-de-sac rather than the proposed road connecting to Bernera Road. This minor change was authorised by resolution point 5.

 

The planning proposal and DCP amendment facilitates the development of the revised design of Basin 14, which will provide much needed stormwater infrastructure and public open space to the rapidly growing suburb of Edmondson Park. The planning proposal enables the appropriate acquisition of land by Council as well as assisting in the orderly development of land adjacent to the basin.

 

Council also resolved (resolution point 3) to review whether the existing left-hand deceleration lane from Camden Valley Way into Bernera Road can be lengthened. Council’s traffic engineers have reviewed the operation of the existing deceleration lane. The deceleration lane is approximately 90m long and operates as a free left turn lane, permitting left turn movements at any time with care. This configuration is slightly longer than other similar deceleration lanes provided at other major intersections. The existing deceleration lane has a wide driveway at its eastern end and a high-pressure gas line exists along this section of Camden Valley Way which would limit the ability for the deceleration lane to be lengthened. An extension of the deceleration lane may require expensive relocation or concrete protection of the gas line.

 

As Camden Valley Way is a classified road under the care and control of Transport for NSW (TfNSW), Council will work with TfNSW to monitor traffic conditions for left turn movements from Camden Valley Way into Bernera Road and if required request the agency to carry out required investigations and potential upgrades to improve traffic movements at the intersection.

 

Council resolved (resolution point 4) to note the need to undertake a revised stormwater drainage plan to minimise the harmful and negative effects of open drains and channel systems. This matter is currently being addressed by Council’s Infrastructure and Environment department. Council has engaged a consultant to undertake detailed investigations and the development of design guidelines for constructed open channels in new release areas.

 

The planning proposal and DCP amendments facilitate the construction of Basin 14. If further amendments are required to the design of the basin resulting from this resolution, it is not anticipated that additional changes to the planning framework will be required.

 

A Gateway determination was issued by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment on 24 September 2019. The planning proposal and the DCP amendment were publicly exhibited from 16 October 2019 until 15 November 2019. Four submissions were received, requesting further stormwater drainage information for the basin and recommending an alternative road layout for inclusion in the DCP.  

 

This report details the post-Gateway actions that have been undertaken, including public exhibition and State agency consultation and recommends that Council approves Amendment 78 to the LEP and Amendment 35 to the DCP as exhibited and delegates to the CEO to liaise with the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment and the Parliamentary Counsel’s Office to finalise the amendment to the LEP and to bring into effect the amendments to the DCP upon publication of the public notice in the local newspaper once the LEP amendment has been gazetted.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Notes the Gateway determination for draft Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 78) and the results of public exhibition and community consultation;

 

2.   Approves Amendment 78 to the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 and delegates authority to the CEO to liaise with the Parliamentary Counsel’s Office and the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment to finalise Amendment 78;

 

3.   Adopts Amendment 35 to Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008, to come into effect upon the publication of the required notice in the local newspaper following gazettal of Amendment 78 to the LLEP; and.

 

4.   Advises those who made a submission of Council’s decision.

 

REPORT

 

The planning proposal relates to ten lots accessible from Camden Valley Way, Bernera Road and Croatia Avenue which are largely undeveloped. One of these lots forms part of the recently re-aligned Bernera Road and one lot is also accessible from Manchuria and Poziers Road.

 

The subject land contains a tributary of Maxwell’s Creek and also contains ‘Maxwell’s Creek North Riparian Park’, which is one of three riparian parks identified under Part 2.11-Edmondson Park of the Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 (LDCP 2008). This park is forecasted to contain passive open space and a children’s play area in accordance with Items 10 and 11 within Section 6.4 of the Edmondson Park Contributions Plan 2008 (the Contributions Plan). It is noted that a transmission easement for electrical lines runs through the site. 

 

The addresses and legal descriptions of the subject lots are detailed within Table 1 below and are identified in Figure 1. The planning proposal does not intend on rezoning the entirety of the subject lands, only part of some land parcels.

 

Land to be rezoned for the facilitation of Basin 14 include approximately 14,000m2 of R1 General Residential zoned land, 3,200m2 of RE1 Public Recreation zoned land and 400m2 of R3 Medium Density Residential zoned land. Miscellaneous zonings along Bernera Road, and development standards for a portion of land south of the basin are to also be amended.

 

Address

Legal Description

Current Zoning* (with approx. size of land to be rezoned)

Proposed Zoning

N/A

Lot 1 DP 1129337

B6 (195m2)

SP2

Lot 1 Bernera Road

Lot 1 DP 1228502

B6 (365m2)

SP2

R3 (25m2)

SP2

No. 10 Croatia Avenue

Lot 2 DP 1228502

SP2 (180m2)

B6

SP2 (50m2)

R3

SP2 (240m2)

RE1

R3 (150m2)

RE1

No. 30 Croatia Avenue

Lot 4 DP 1228502

SP2 (400m2)

R3

SP2 (50m2)

RE1

R1 (3,300m2)

RE1

R3 (250m2)

RE1

No. 50 Croatia Avenue

Lot 6 DP 1228502

SP2 (15m2)

R1

No. 2072 Camden Valley Way

Lot 1 DP 567321

R1 (5,250m2)

RE1

No. 2082 Camden Valley Way

Lot 2 DP 567321

R1 (5,000m2)

RE1

Lot 12 Camden Valley Way

Lot 12 DP 1239712

RE1 (3,200m2)

R1

Lot 304 Dragoon Road

Lot 304 DP 1238463

R1 (215m2)

RE1

Lot 164 Manchuria Road

Lot 164 DP 1218597

R1 (220m2)

RE1

Table 1: Subject lot addresses, legal descriptions and proposed changes

 

* Note: All lots subject to this planning proposal contain more than one land use zone. The ‘Current Zoning’ column of this table only relates to the portion of land within that lot to be rezoned.

 

Lot 164 Manchuria Rd
DP 1218597
Lot 304 Dragoon Rd 
DP 1238463
Lot 12 Camden Valley Way DP 12397122082 Camden Valley Way Lot 2 DP 5673212072 Camden Valley Way
Lot 1 DP 567321
50 Croatia Ave Lot 6 DP 122850230 Croatia Ave
Lot 4 DP 1228502
10 Croatia Ave
Lot 2 DP 1228502
Lot 1 Bernera Rd
DP 1228502
Lot 1 DP 1129337

Figure 1: Aerial view of subject lots

 

Proposed amendments to Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008

 

This planning proposal seeks to amend the LLEP 2008 to facilitate the development of the revised basin design, as follows:

 

·    The revised design extends Basin 14 further south, resulting in additional land to be acquired by Council. RE1 Public Recreation zone is to be extended to cover the new footprint of the basin. The extension of the basin has resulted in a long narrow parcel of residential zoned land that is unfeasible to develop due to its current size. As quality open space is in high demand in Edmondson Park due to rapid residential development, this land is to also be rezoned from R1 General Residential to RE1 Public Recreation and used as an area of public open space adjacent to the basin.

 

·    The revised design has identified land currently zoned R3 Medium Density Residential within a new basin footprint. This land is to be rezoned to RE1 Public Recreation. This includes approximately 150m2 of land at 10 Croatia Avenue (Lot 2 DP 1228502) which is too small to develop independently, and approximately 250m2 of land at 30 Croatia Avenue (Lot 4 DP 1228502). This land has been removed from the outskirts of the R3 Medium Density Residential land and the remaining area is an acceptable level of development yield.

 

 

 

·    The revised design has resulted in RE1 Public Recreation zoned land at Lot 12 Camden Valley Way (DP 1239712) identified as surplus to Council’s initial requirements for the basin footprint. As this land is no longer required for acquisition by Council, it is to be rezoned to R1 General Residential to assist in the orderly development of the area surrounding the basin.

 

·    The revised basin design has resulted in amendments to the Indicative Layout Plan (ILP) within Part 2.11 of the Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 (LDCP 2008). This is to provide a new road layout and pedestrian access around the site. The amendment of development standards on a portion of land at 50 Croatia Avenue (Lot 6 DP 1228502) will rationalise standards in accordance with the ILP amendment. The height, floor space ratio and dwelling density standards are to be increased, and minimum lot size standards are to be reduced, to correspond with the current standards on the western part of this lot.

 

The Land Use Zoning, Minimum Lot Size, Floor Space Ratio, Maximum Height of Buildings, Land Reservation for Acquisition and Minimum Dwelling Density LLEP 2008 maps are to be amended as part of this proposal. 

 

Figure 2 below summarises the land zoning amendments proposed:

4. Development standards to be rationalised in accordance with Draft ILP 1. R1 land to be rezoned RE1 (with approximate civil works line for basin shown in red)3. RE1 land to be rezoned R15. Various re-zonings along Bernera Road 2. R3 land to be rezoned RE1

Figure 2: Matters addressed within the planning proposal

 

 

Amendments to the DCP

 

The Indicative Layout Plan (ILP) is a map in the DCP which shows the future road network and the land uses in the precinct (e.g. residential, active open space etc.). The ILP provides Council, developers and landowners with certainty as to how the land will be developed in a coordinated manner. Land developed in accordance with the ILP ensures optimal traffic flow and accessibility throughout the precinct.

 

Figure 3: Location of Maxwell’s Creek and existing DCP road network

 

As with the LEP, the proposed amendments to the DCP aim to reflect the revised design of Basin 14. This is achieved by amending several DCP maps, including the ILP, to reflect the footprint of the revised basin and the new road layout in the vicinity of the basin, as detailed below.

 

·    Footprint of Maxwell’s Creek North Riparian Park: The footprint has been extended to cover the extent of Basin 14 and incorporate all land to be acquired by Council for the development of this park. The portion of land at Lot 12 Camden Valley Way identified as part of the park has been removed as it is no longer required for acquisition by Council.  

 

·    Road layout in the vicinity of Maxwell’s Creek North Riparian Park

 

The local road previously situated south of the riparian park is proposed to be relocated further south, adjacent to the park, generally along the northern boundary of 50 Croatia Ave (Lot 6 DP 1228502). The location of this road will promote residential amenity and safety, providing separation between the park and future dwellings to the south. These dwellings will front the local road, providing passive surveillance to the open space, instead of having the rear of dwellings backing onto the park.

 

In response to the relocation of this local road, a road link south of the park has been altered to rationalise street connections and manage traffic flow through the precinct.

 

·    Pedestrian access: Two 10m wide pedestrian access ways leading to Maxwell’s Creek North Riparian Park have been added to the Street Types map, as discussed further below.

PROPOSEDEXISTING 

Figure 4: Proposed Indicative Layout Plan

 

Pedestrian Access Ways

 

It is vital that Maxwell’s Creek North Riparian Park is easily accessible to the public. The proposed DCP amendment includes the provision of two pedestrian access ways to the riparian park (shown hatched in Figure 5), as follows.

 

·    The western access way replaces the proposed local road link from Zepplin Road to Bernera Road with pedestrian access only; and

 

·    The eastern access way leads to the riparian park from Lot 12 Camden Valley Way (DP 1239712). This corridor is to be co-located with the stormwater easement leading from this lot to the basin, thereby optimising land and assisting in the overall development of this site. The current road layout has a small local road leading from this lot towards the house of worship on the neighbouring lot. This has been removed, as the pedestrian link will improve pedestrian permeability between the lots and this road is no longer required as the access driveway to Camden Valley Way is being retained.  

 

·    Part of a laneway (circled in the existing map of Figure 5 below) adjacent to Camden Valley Way, has been removed from this map, as it is not required for the effective development of the land it was originally intended to service. Its intersection would be too close to the Bernera Road intersection and an existing bus stop.

Figure 5: Proposed Street Types Maps

 

The proposed DCP amendment provides detail as to the design of these pedestrian access ways within Section 2.1 Street Network and Access, as follows: 

 

“Pedestrian Access Way

All pedestrian access ways are to be designed in accordance with the 10m wide access way detailed in Figure 18. Any other through site links, pedestrian access paths or overland flow paths that continue the desire line of a road corridor are to be the same width of that corridor.”  

 

The cross section in Figure 6 below indicates the proposed design solution which would be applied to these pedestrian access links and is the new ‘Figure 18’ within the amended DCP. In conjunction with providing pedestrian access to public open space, the corridors will also improve pedestrian permeability and overland stormwater flow paths within Edmondson Park. Additionally, the corridor is sufficiently wide to provide for good sight lines, limiting opportunities for concealment and other crime related activities.  

 

 

 

Figure 6: Pedestrian Access - 10m

 

Gateway determination

 

The Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) issued a Gateway determination on 24 September 2019 (Attachment 1). The Gateway conditions required Council to undertake several actions, including:

 

·    Prior to public exhibition, Council is to amend an appropriate diagram within the panning proposal to show the boundaries of the proposed basin and include an appropriate key on the diagram. This was completed.

·    Publically exhibit the proposal and relevant documentation for a minimum of 28 days;

·    Provide a minimum of 21 days for the following public authorities to comment on the proposal:

§  Sydney Water

§  Roads and Maritime Services (RMS)

§  Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (Environment, Energy and Science group)

§  Endeavour Energy

§  TransGrid

§  APA Gas

§  Jemena Gas

 

The Gateway determination also authorised Council as the local plan-making authority to make LLEP Amendment 78.

 

 

 

Public Authority Consultation

 

In accordance with the Gateway determination, a copy of the relevant documentation was forwarded to public authorities for comment from 16 October 2019 to 15 November 2019.  Summaries of each submission and the Council officer’s response are summarised in Table 2 below and original copies are included in Attachment 2. No objection to the planning proposal was raised by RMS, Sydney Water, TransGrid, Jemena Gas and the Environment, Energy and Science division of the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE). No changes are required as a result of public authority consultation.

 

Public authority

 

Summary of submission

 

Officer comments

 

APA Gas

No objection raised.

Recommended conditions to include in any consent issued for the proposal.

The proposed conditions are standard practice that will be followed during the construction of the basin and do not materially affect the planning proposal. 

Endeavour Energy

No objection raised.

Recommended conditions for the development of the basin infrastructure and the removal of an existing electricity easement on private property within the basin area.

The proposed conditions are standard practice that will be followed during the construction of the basin and do not materially affect the planning proposal.

Sydney Water

No objection raised.

Recommended Council engage a Water Servicing Coordinator to develop a design option that complies with Sydney Water’s Building Over and Adjacent to Sydney Water Assets requirements. Based on the proposed design, Sydney Water may determine that further adjustment works and/or protection works are required to ensure there is no risk of damage to their assets. 

Council’s Infrastructure and Environment department have been notified of Sydney Water’s advice so that this can be considered before finalising the detail design and construction of the Basin. This will not materially affect the planning proposal.

Roads and Maritime Services

No comments received

No response required

Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (Environment,  Energy and Science Group) 

No comments received

No response required

TransGrid

No comments received

No response required.

Jemena Gas

No comments received

No response required.

Table 2: Public authority submissions and officer response

 

Community Consultation

 

In accordance with the Gateway determination, the planning proposal and relevant documents were placed on public exhibition from 16 October 2019 until 15 November 2019. Notices were placed on Council’s website and the Liverpool Leader and letters were sent to affected landowners and neighbouring landowners and occupiers. Four submissions were received. All the submissions received were from the adjoining landowners. Summaries of each submission and the Council officer response are listed in Table 3 below and original copies of submission are included in Confidential Attachment 3. No changes are proposed to the planning proposal or DCP amendment as a result of community consultation.


 

No.

Summary of submission

Officer comments

1

Under the exhibited basin design, the existing drainage infrastructure (including an on-site detention basin) within the residential subdivision needs to be augmented and an existing road needs to be demolished and rebuilt in order to drain to Basin 14.

 

Two options for connection to Basin 14 were suggested by the submitter:

 

·    Augmenting the existing stormwater   infrastructure, which will require demolition and reconstruction of an existing road; or

·    Extending the existing stormwater infrastructure on its current alignment.

This is not within the scope of the planning proposal and the DCP amendments. Details on future stormwater connections from the submitters development site to Council’s stormwater network and decommissioning of existing on-site temporary basins are to be addressed  at the time of releasing a subdivision certificate or through future development applications for the new R1 zone land (rezoned from RE1) to the west of the current development site.

 

The respondent was provided advice regarding the basin design by Council’s Infrastructure and Environment department in order to resolve the issue of connecting to the basin. Stormwater connection options will be reviewed and approved by Council’s subdivision engineers at the time of decommissioning the existing on-site detention basin.

Requested confirmation on the alignment of the pedestrian access pathway form the residential subdivision to the basin area and if any readjustment would be needed to maintenance track MT14 due to the possible changes.

The proposed stormwater connection to Basin 14 does not require any change to the alignment of the proposed pedestrian pathway and maintenance track MT14. No changes have been proposed.

A stormwater drainage easement is recommended to allow the connection of stormwater into Basin 14 and allow for any overland flow following that alignment.

Council’s standard procedure will be followed for creating any required stormwater drainage easements at the DA stage. The DCP provides a new cross-section for a combined pedestrian/overland flow path.

2

Recommended changes to the ILP affecting land immediately south of the basin site and provided a diagram showing the proposed alignment for the north-south portion of the exhibited DCP road layout.

 

 

This is not supported. The exhibited road network is designed to provide access to the Basin 14 recreation area from Bernera Road, and to ensure any dwellings constructed to the south are separated from the basin by a public road. Further, the exhibited changes to the road network are to facilitate a low density development pattern (namely adequate lot dimension) for this location as per the DCP and intent for this area. The recommended alternative road layout is not consistent with the objectives of the DCP and would result in a poorer built form outcome. Further consideration could be considered as part of a future DA for this site, if the submitter provides detailed subdivision/building plans demonstrating a better outcome.

Recommended removal of a portion of the exhibited east-west road alignment and a portion of the existing road network east of the electricity easement.

 

This is not supported. As above, removing the road is inconsistent with the development pattern for this area and is inconsistent with principles of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) as dwellings would no longer be oriented to overlook the public open space.

Proposed dedication of existing electricity easement land to Council for public open space.

The proposed dedication of land is not within the scope of this planning proposal and DCP amendments. Council’s standard practice will be followed for any proposed land dedications at the DA stage.

3

Recommended removing a portion of a planned north-south road east of the existing electricity easement.

As above, this is not supported as it will reduce connectivity and efficient traffic movement within the area. Roads are provided adjacent to the electricity easements to ensure dwellings overlook this space in keeping with principles of CPTED.

Requested to retain the existing alignment of Croatia Avenue

 

This is not within the scope of this planning proposal and DCP amendments. Without lodgment of a DA for development of the site, Council cannot consider the merits of this proposal.

4

Supported the alternative road layout proposed in the abovementioned submissions.

The alternative road layout is not supported, as detailed above.

Table 3: Public submissions and officer response

 

Other parts of the 26 June 2019 Council resolution

 

Deceleration Lane into Bernera Road

 

Council also resolved (resolution point 3) to review whether the existing left-hand deceleration lane from Camden Valley Way into Bernera Road can be lengthened. Council’s traffic engineers have reviewed the operation of the existing deceleration lane. The deceleration lane is approximately 90m long and operates as a free left turn lane, permitting left turn movements at any time with care. This configuration is slightly longer than other similar deceleration lanes provided at other major intersections. The existing deceleration lane has a wide driveway at its eastern end and a high-pressure gas line exists along this section of Camden Valley Way which would limit the ability for the deceleration lane to be lengthened. An extension of the deceleration lane may require expensive relocation or concrete protection of the gas line.

 

As Camden Valley Way is a classified road under the care and control of Transport for NSW (TfNSW), Council will work with TfNSW to monitor traffic conditions for left turn movements from Camden Valley Way into Bernera Road and if required request the agency to carry out required investigations and potential upgrades to improve traffic movements at the intersection.

 

Open drains and channel systems

 

Council resolved to note the need to undertake a revised stormwater drainage plan to minimise the harmful and negative effects of open drains and channel systems. This matter is currently being addressed by Council’s Infrastructure and Environment department. Council has engaged a consultant to undertake detailed investigations and the development of design guidelines for constructed open channels in new release areas.

 

The planning proposal and DCP amendments facilitate the construction of Basin 14. If further amendments are required to the design of the basin resulting from this resolution, it is not anticipated that additional changes to the planning framework will be required.

 

 

 

Next Steps

 

If Council approves Amendment 78 to the LEP, the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment will be notified. The NSW Parliamentary Counsel’s Office and DPIE will then be requested to finalise Amendment 78. Upon gazettal of the LEP, a notice in a locally circulating newspaper will then be published advising of the adoption by Council of Amendment 35 to the Liverpool DCP.

 

Conclusion

 

The Gateway requirements for Amendment 78 LLEP, including public exhibition have been satisfied, and submissions received have been addressed. Amendment 35 to the DCP has also been publicly exhibited and the submissions received have been addressed.

Most of the points raised in submissions are appropriately considered as part of future development applications, or detailed design of the basin, which are not related to establishing planning controls for the basin. Modifications to the ILP are not supported as they would compromise connectivity and opportunities for passive surveillance compared to the ILP as exhibited.

 

It is recommended that Council approves Amendment 78 LLEP 2008 and adopts Amendment 35 LDCP 2008.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Deliver and maintain a range of transport related infrastructure such as footpaths, bus shelters and bikeways.

Deliver a high quality local road system including provision and maintenance of infrastructure and management of traffic issues.

Environment

Manage the environmental health of waterways.

Manage air, water, noise and chemical pollution.

Support the delivery of a range of transport options.


Social

Support policies and plans that prevent crime.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Gateway determination (Under separate cover)

2.         Public authority submissions (Under separate cover)

3.         Public submissions (Under separate cover) - Confidential

4.         Final Planning Proposal (Under separate cover)

5.         Final DCP (Under separate cover)  


1

Ordinary Meeting

26 February 2020

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 05

Draft Intermodal Precinct Committee Charter

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Increase community engagement

File Ref

029355.2020

Report By

David Smith - Manager Planning & Transport Strategy

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council at its 25 September 2019 meeting resolved to “review the committee’s terms of reference to reflect the current situation with the Intermodal and the name be changed to the Intermodal Precinct Committee”.

 

The review of the committee charter has been completed and Council endorsement of the Charter is requested to enable expressions of interest for community committee members to be undertaken.

 

Council previously resolved that the CEO, Mayor, Cr Hadchiti and Cr Harle will determine the community committee members. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council endorse the Intermodal Precinct Committee Charter and revoke the Intermodal Committee Charter

 

 

REPORT

 

Council at its 25 September 2019 meeting resolved to review the Intermodal Committee Charter to reflect the current situation with the Intermodal and for the name to be changed to the Intermodal Precinct Committee. The review has been completed and Council’s endorsement of the Intermodal Precinct Committee Charter (Attachment 1) is requested to enable expressions of interest for community committee members to be undertaken.

 

The proposed functions of the Committee are:

 

a)   To ensure, through collaboration with the Intermodal company, that the economic benefits of the Intermodal development are realised for Liverpool;

 

b)   To support local jobs and economic growth arising from the Intermodal development for the benefit of Liverpool;

 

c)   To provide advice to assist in any Council submissions on development or modification applications relating to the Intermodal development, with emphasis on minimising adverse impacts and supporting economic development;

 

d)   To develop partnerships with relevant stakeholders, environmental groups and key organisations; and

 

e)   To make recommendations to Council regarding achievement of positive outcomes for the residents of Liverpool.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Facilitate economic development.

Environment

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Draft Intermodal Precinct Committee Charter


1

EGROW 05

Draft Intermodal Precinct Committee Charter

Attachment 1

Draft Intermodal Precinct Committee Charter

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


1

Ordinary Meeting

26 February 2020

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 06

Liverpool City Centre Car Parking Strategy

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Advocate for, and develop, transport networks to create an accessible city

File Ref

032711.2020

Report By

Charles Wiafe - Service Manager Traffic and Transport

Approved By

Tim Moore - Director, City Economy and Growth / Deputy CEO

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At its meeting on 13 December 2019, Council considered a report on the Liverpool City Centre Car Parking Strategy and resolved as follows:

 

1.   Defer the matter to the 26 February 2020 Council meeting and the following matters be addressed in the report:

 

a)   Note that the preferred option in line with council plans for over 20 years now is the extension of Bathurst Street and the closure of Pirie Street, which would be suitable but not limited to a carpark.

b)   Should there be constraints on Pirie Street, identify a location within 100m of Liverpool train station, which Council owns or can acquire for a carpark.

c)   RMS traffic material as provided to date, be provided to Councillors.

 

2.   As soon as practicable increase the 15-minute free parking to 30 minutes.

 

This report presents the revised Liverpool City Centre Car Parking Strategy and addresses the above resolution from the December 2019 Council meeting. 

 

The parking strategy has been revised to address issues raised in the above resolution and this report recommends that Council adopts the Liverpool City Centre Car Parking Strategy to enable management of increased car parking in the Liverpool city centre.

 

The report also provides responses on other resolution points and issues raised during Council’s discussion on the parking strategy.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts the Liverpool City Centre Car Parking Strategy 2020-2030.

 

REPORT

 

December 2019 Council resolution

 

Council resolved at its 11 December 2019 meeting to defer consideration of the parking strategy and for the following matters to be addressed in the report:

 

1(a)   Note that the preferred option in line with Council plans for over 20 years now is the extension of Bathurst Street and the closure of Pirie Street, which would be suitable but not limited to a carpark

 

Response

 

Design investigation for the Bathurst Street extension project is continuing. The design of the project has been delayed because of the impact of a Transport for NSW (TfNSW) proposed six lane road reserve along Terminus Street. It is expected that TfNSW will provide clarification of the extent of the road reserve, within the next six months.

 

The effectiveness of the Bathurst Street extension and its potential to achieve a closure of Pirie Street, between Macquarie Street and Terminus Street, can only be understood and assessed when the extent of the road reserve to support a six-lane configuration is confirmed by TfNSW.  Once confirmed, a further report on the Bathurst Street extension will be presented to a Council meeting, assessing impacts on traffic flow and the level of service of the key intersections. If it is concluded that Pirie Street can be closed, then provision of a car park in this location will be investigated. This is included as a conditional short-term (2020-2021) action in the parking strategy.

 

1(b)   Should there be constraints on Pirie Street, identify a location within 100m of Liverpool train station, which Council owns or can acquire for a carpark.

 

Response

 

If the design investigations for the Bathurst Street Extension project conclude that the section of Pirie Street cannot be closed, a further report on the identification of suitable sites within 100m of Liverpool station for a car park will be presented to a future Council meeting. This has been added to the parking strategy as a conditional short-term action.

 

1(c)   RMS traffic material as provided to date, be provided to Councillors

 

Response

 

Council is aware that RMS carried out a "Liverpool / Moorebank Region and the Terminals" Traffic Study in 2015/2016. The study included:

 

-     Aimsun micro-simulation modelling to replicate 2015 base year traffic conditions (across an area that includes the Liverpool City Centre),

-     forecast future traffic conditions; and

-     an assessment of possible improvement projects.

 

In 2017, Council requested, and RMS provided, a copy of their 2015 base year Aimsun micro-simulation model for the Liverpool City Centre. This base model replicates traffic conditions in 2015 and was used as an input to the 2017 Liverpool City Centre Transport and Transport Study (to support Amendment 52 LLEP).

 

Council does not however have the forecast future traffic conditions and related improvement projects. Council resolved at its meeting on 5 February 2020 to “lodge a GIPA application with RMS for the traffic modeling report”. This application is currently being prepared.

 

2.   As soon as practicable increase the 15-minute free parking to 30 minutes

 

Response

 

Increasing the 15-minute free parking to 30 minutes requires modifications to parking meters and regulatory signs. The required changes are underway and scheduled for completion in March 2020.

 

Other issues raised during Council’s discussion at the 11 December 2019 meeting:

 

In addition to the above resolution, Councillors raised concerns with certain deliverables contained in the Strategy. Responses to the issues are as follows:

 

Deliverable

Issue raised

Response

D3 – Introduce a car share scheme into Liverpool city centre

The policy to include possible fees payable to Council by car share operators.

The strategy has been revised for a fee payable by Car Share operators to be included in Council’s fees and charges (after a trial period of 12 months)

D6 – Car Park pricing

Clarification on pricing

The strategy has been revised to acknowledge that car parking pricing is included in Council’s fees and charges and is reviewed annually

D10 - Optimising usage of car parking spaces

Clarification of the approach to optimise the use of parking spaces 

The strategy has been revised to include management approaches such as timed parking, simplified signage and annual review of car parking fees through the annual budget process.

D9 – Construction of a car park within the Bathurst Street extension road reserve

Clarification of this project  

Construction of a car park within the Bathurst Street extension road reserve has been deleted following Council’s resolution at its December 2019 meeting. 

 

 

Background to the Parking Strategy

 

Council has prepared several parking strategies to manage parking demand in the city centre over the last 10 years. The first strategy was adopted in February 2010 and updated in June 2013.

 

The key deliverables of the 2010/2013 strategies were:

 

·    Establish a free commuter carpark at Collimore Park;

·    Increase the number of on-street parking spaces in the city centre;

·    Rationalise and simplify on and off-street parking time restrictions;

·    Introduce pay and display parking on-street and off-street in selected areas of the city centre core;

·    Investigate the decommissioning and reconstruction of the Northumberland Street carpark, including temporary parking areas;

·    Introduce a residential parking permit policy;

·    Increase access to the city centre carparks, and improve conditions for vehicular traffic, buses, pedestrians and cyclists.

 

Through the implementation of these strategies, Council has managed parking demand in the Liverpool city centre by introducing parking meters, timed parking restrictions and a parking permit policy.

 

More recently, Council has increased parking supply in the Liverpool city centre by constructing additional car spaces at Collimore Park, Whitlam Leisure Centre (Woodward Park) and the temporary Bathurst Street car park at 352 Macquarie Street.

 

Council has also commenced construction of additional car parking at 68 Speed Street, Liverpool to provide for addition car parking in the south of the city and additional public car parking is planned at the Council’s Civic Place development on Scott Street and a multi-story car park at Collimore Park/Woodward Park (currently subject to a planning proposal at Collimore Park).

 

Council continues to advocate for faster and more reliable and accessible public transport both within the Liverpool LGA and to key employment centres including Parramatta and the Sydney CBD.

 

Council has collaborated with the NSW government in implementing the new ‘Park n Pay’ smart phone app which allows drivers to pay for parking and top up using their smart phones.

 

Why prepare a new Strategy

 

The importance of a new car parking strategy is underpinned by rapid growth and key objectives in the Sydney Region Plan - A Metropolis of Three Cites, which earmarks the Liverpool city centre as part of the metropolitan city cluster within the Western Parkland City. Over the coming decades, the city centre is expected to undergo significant land use change and population growth. The city centre has a strong retail and commercial core, significant residential development to the north and south of the city centre core and a growing health and education precinct through the Liverpool Innovation Precinct.

 

Council has rezoned the majority of the city centre (from B3 Commercial Core to B4 Mixed Use) to facilitate increased mixed-use development to assist in the growth and revitalisation of the city centre. In addition, Council has positioned the Liverpool city centre as Sydney’s third CBD and there are significant opportunities arising from development of the Western Sydney International Airport and the Aerotropolis and the Liverpool Innovation, Health and Education Precinct. This level of development will have a major impact on critical transport infrastructure in the Liverpool city centre including access to public transport and car parking.

 

The Liverpool City Centre Car Parking Strategy identifies the need for further optimisation of car parking in the city centre, including demand management, mode shift to public transport and additional car parking in appropriate locations to meet the needs of a growing city.

 

Journey to work data reveals that the proportion of workers accessing the Liverpool city centre by car (and parking in the city centre) is higher than that of Parramatta and substantially higher than that of the Sydney CBD. As the city centre is positioned to be the third CBD in Sydney, the proportion of workers accessing the Liverpool city centre by vehicles needs to decline steadily and public transport use needs to increase to ensure a sustainable city, to avoid significant additional traffic congestion and to maximise the place qualities and attributes of Liverpool CBD for jobs growth and economic productivity.

 

There are approximately 10,500 car parking spaces within the city centre. This includes approximately 2,600 on-street spaces and 7,900 off street spaces (public and private). Existing on-street parking demand in the city centre is high with an occupancy rate of at least 85%. The car parking strategy notes that ‘turnover’ of limited on-street car parking spaces is important because it increases economic activity and provides clear benefits for the business community. 

 

 

 

About the Strategy

 

The Strategy focuses on the Liverpool city centre as defined by the Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008. This area is bound by Moore Point to the east, Hume Highway to the north and west and the Shepherd Street Precinct to the south.

 

The purpose of the Strategy is to manage parking demand and supply in the Liverpool city centre over the next 10 years. The Strategy establishes a baseline of the city’s parking environment, acknowledges current car parking provision and issues, and includes a Delivery Plan.

 

Principles and Objectives

 

The Strategy includes the following key principles:

 

P1.       Optimise the capacity of short-term and long-term parking within the Liverpool City Centre.

P2.       Strike an appropriate balance between parking provision and demand for public space by ensuring that pedestrian priority and amenity is maintained on all streets.

P3.       Ensure that significant disruptions and decisions that may cause negative economic impacts on local businesses are minimised.

P4.       Provide an urban environment and transport network which provides for public and active transport choices to reduce parking demand.

P5.       Provide a clear, accessible car-parking environment.

P6.       Ensure adequate provisions are made for motorcycle, bicycle and mobility impaired users.

P7.       Ensure that management of parking responds to changing transport systems and services and is adaptable to disruption technologies such as car-sharing and Mobility as a Service (MaaS).

P8.       Align with other relevant NSW Government policies and Council strategies.

 

The strategy includes the following objectives to ensure that the key principles can be delivered:

 

·    Identify the appropriateness of providing increased car parking within the Liverpool city centre;

·      Further evaluate the concept of concentrating public parking on the fringe of the Liverpool City Centre, including complementary transportation, impacts on passing trade, effectiveness, and user acceptance of this approach;

·    Provide parking infrastructure that responds to land use changes, population and economic growth in the Liverpool city centre over the next 10 years;

·    Improve parking accessibility (general and special needs) for shoppers, visitors, trades people and local businesses to support economic growth;

·    Explore and deploy smart parking technologies to support an efficient and innovative city centre; and

·    Provide a delivery framework, to improve parking over the next 10 years, including the recommended number and location of car spaces.

 

Actions and Deliverables

 

The following actions are identified in the Strategy:

 

A1.    Provide a benchmark on the appropriate supply of public parking;

A2.    Improve and simplify parking signage;

A3.    Optimise existing on-street parking provision; 

A4.    Investigate opportunities for long-term parking to be located at the periphery of the city centre;

A5.    Investigate the potential for ride-sharing facilities in residential areas;

A6.    Review Council’s parking prices;

A7.    Investigate funding sources for the provision of additional parking in and around the city centre;

A8.    Investigate and identify alternative uses for car parks; and

A9.    Investigate the provision of additional parking in the city centre.

 

The deliverables identified below represent individual projects which can address one or more of the above actions as outlined in the strategy.

 

 

Deliverable

Description

Timeline

D1

Public parking rate benchmarks

The benchmark will enable an assessment of public car parking provision in the city.

 

A benchmark for car parking provision in the city centre, would be developed by using current research on demand and public parking provision (for short-term and all-day parking) in modern, vibrant city centres, taking into consideration measures to encourage higher public transport use and reduce car parking in the centre core.

 

Short term   2020/2021

D2

Construct new car park at 68 Speed Street

Demolish and construct an at-grade carpark comprising approximately 75 car spaces, at 68 Speed Street

Short term 2020-2021

D3

Introduce a car share scheme into Liverpool city centre

Work with car share companies to introduce a car share scheme into Liverpool city centre, with annual fee for the required parking spaces after a trial period.

Short term 2020/2021

D4

Identify a location within 100m of Liverpool train station, for a carpark

Identify a location within 100m of Liverpool train station, for a carpark, if Pirie Street cannot be closed to accommodate a car park

Short term 2020/2021

D5

Provide simplified parking signage

Involves installation of new signs to simplify and clarify parking restrictions and improve traffic flow.

Short term 2020/2022

D6

Review of car parking pricing and on-street free parking

Ongoing annual review of on-street and off-street parking fees.

Short term 2020/2025

D7

Collimore/Woodward Park carpark – Additional Car Parking

Construct a multi-deck car park at Collimore Park with approximately 1000 spaces; or alternatively increase the number of new spaces at Woodward Park (as part of the Woodward Place masterplan) to provide all-day parking for city centre employees, visitors and university students.

Medium to long term 2020/2025

D8

Investigate further opportunities to provide angled parking

Investigate where angled parking bays can be provided, in accordance with the measures outlined the City Centre Public Domain Masterplan and parking rate benchmarks.

Short to long term 2019/2030

D9

Investigate and install Dynamic parking guidance system

Involves the provision of electronic/dynamic directional wayfinding to off-street car parks (with the potential to include on-street facilities as this becomes available).  The signage information could include the number of available parking spaces. The signs can be linked to a mobile phone app to alert drivers of available parking.

Short to long term 2020/2030

D10

Optimising usage of car parking spaces

Optimising involves:

·     Encourage turnover of parking spaces by reviewing parking fees for on-street parking (longer than 2 hours)

·     Prioritising short term parking near health facilities

 

·     Introduce timed parking restrictions (3- or 4-hour parking) to unrestricted parking areas

·     Investigate locations where ½ P can be installed.

Short

to long term 2020/2030

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consultation

 

The Strategy has been prepared in consultation with City Design & Public Domain, City Economy, Community Development and Planning, Infrastructure Delivery and Property & Commercial Development departments.

 

During implementation of this Strategy, consultation will be undertaken with the community and key external stakeholders.

 

Conclusion

 

This Strategy identifies actions and a delivery plan to increase the availability of parking within the city centre as well as encouraging mode shift to active and public transport to manage demand for car parking in the Liverpool city centre.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Provide efficient parking for the City Centre.

Deliver a high-quality local road system including provision and maintenance of infrastructure and management of traffic issues.

Facilitate economic development.

Environment

Promote an integrated and user-friendly public transport service.

Support the delivery of a range of transport options.


Social

Preserve and maintain heritage, both landscape and cultural as urban development takes place.


Civic Leadership

Actively advocate for federal and state government support, funding and services.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Liverpool City Centre Car Parking Strategy (Under separate cover)   


1

Ordinary Meeting 26 February 2020

City Community and Culture Report

 

COM 01

Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Implement access and equity for all members of the community

File Ref

330035.2019

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Dr Eddie Jackson - Director City Community and Culture

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council is committed to building strong and resilient communities in the Liverpool Local Government Area (LGA) and to maximising social wellbeing. Council helps achieve these goals by providing financial support through grants and sponsorships to develop leadership skills, increase participation in community activities and address identified social issues.

 

This report provides funding recommendations totalling $33,000 under the Corporate Sponsorship, Matching and Sustainable Environment Grant Programs for Council’s consideration.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council endorses the recommendation of $10,000 (GST exclusive) under the Corporate Sponsorship Program for the following project:

 

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Liverpool-Fairfield Community Radio

Transmission Upgrade

$10,000

That Council endorses the recommendation of $18,000 (GST exclusive) under the Matching Grants Program for the following projects:

 

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Holsworthy High P&C Association

Holsworthy Community Garden Greening Dreaming

$9,000

CuriousWorks Incorporated

GENerate 2168

$9,000

That Council endorses the recommendation of $5,000 (GST exclusive) under the Sustainable Environment Grants Program for the following project:

 

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Middleton Grange Public School

Lakeside Outdoor Learning Project

$5,000

REPORT

 

Corporate Sponsorship Program

 

The Corporate Sponsorship Program received one application which met the eligibility criteria and is recommended for funding as follows:

 

Applicant

Liverpool – Fairfield Community Radio

Project

Transmission Upgrade

Description

Objective: Replace a faulty transmitter that is underperforming and impacting reach and access to the local community. Liverpool–Fairfield Community Radio provides community language programs to a diverse range of language and cultural groups. With more stable transmission facilities, broadcasts will reach more people with important community information.

Outcomes:

·     Provide a stable and consistent transmission over FM or main radio services;

·     Maintain and increase audience reach;

·     Retain and increase number of groups presenting programs; and

·     Obtain a power increase to reflect the density and size of radio coverage area.

Beneficiaries

·     55,000 people (estimated audience for Community Radio within the Liverpool LGA); and

·     Liverpool City Council to receive 150 x 30 second “run of station” announcement slots each month.

Assessment

Recommended for Funding - $10,000

The applicant’s project aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 1 Creating Connections and Direction 3 Generating Opportunity and meets the Corporate Sponsorship Program’s funding outcomes. The project improves access and reach to community services and information broadcasted through Community Radio, enabling representation for many cultural groups across Liverpool LGA. The project provides unique and impactful branding opportunities as part of the funding agreement, and will enable greater connection between LCC and Community Radio audience members. LCC’s Communications team will be connected to leverage the best possible value from the sponsorship slots delivered by Liverpool-Fairfield Community Radio.

·     Economic benefit: 7.7 – 1. a), and b).

·     Community, cultural, and social benefits 7.7 – 2. a), b), c).

·     Expected program outcomes 7.7.1 - a), b), d), and e).

 

Matching Grants Program

 

The Matching Grants Program received two applications which met the eligibility criteria and are recommended for funding as follows:

 

Applicant

Holsworthy High P&C Association

Project

Holsworthy Community Garden Greening Dreaming

Description

Objective: Partnering with SCRAP Ltd, enhance the Holsworthy community garden, to teach students and the community curriculum integrated project-based learning activities. Development of a herb spiral and Aboriginal hut by Construction students, floral and signage drawing for Art students, and growing, harvesting and preparation of native foods by Food Technology, Maths and English students. Community gardeners will learn composting, mulching, and water and soil recovery practices across six weekends.

Outcomes:

·     Environmental education to learn and adopt new recycling, composting, water conservation, and food preparation skills;

·     Enhanced facility for the community to access including schools, preschools, and community members;

·     Learn how to maintain tools, materials and resources; and

·     Collaboration and capacity building between students, teachers, and community members.

Beneficiaries

·     300 students;

·     150 community members; and

·     50 teachers.

Assessment

Recommended for Funding - $9,000

The project aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 2 Strengthening and Protecting Our Environment and meets the Matching Grant Program’s funding priorities of community capacity building, youth engagement, and environmental improvement. The project delivers a self-sustaining garden cared for and promoted by a partnership between Holsworthy High School, SCRAP Ltd and community members.

Expected program outcomes 7.6.1 – a), b), c), and e).

 

Applicant

CuriousWorks Incorporated

Project

GENerate 2168

Description

Objective: Create, deliver and evaluate a youth-engagement program in the 2168 community. Funding will support performance workshops across 20 weeks of research, consultation and delivery towards the GENerate 2168 Festival scheduled for 14 November 2020. GENerate 2168 will engage, plan and co-create artistic outcomes with young people to showcase ideas for improving the civic participation and quality of life in the 2168 area.

Outcomes:

·     Develop a stable, free and accessible creative hub;

·     Deliver performing arts workshops that teach, advocate and promote drama, music, multimedia and event production;

·     Introduce participants to mentors, organisations and spaces to support creative pathways;

·     Build upon the 2019 pilot of the Miller Drama Group; and

·     Empower participants to become visible, creative and articulate contributors to the 2168 community.

Beneficiaries

·     100 participants aged 12-24; and

·     15 existing members of the Miller Drama Group.

Assessment

Recommended for Funding - $9,000

The project aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 1 Creating Connection and Direction 4 Leading Through Collaboration and meets the Matching Grant Program’s funding priorities of arts, community capacity building and youth engagement. The project delivers an artistic platform for young people to create and share their visions for a safe, creative and culturally vibrant 2168 neighbourhood. GENerate 2168 will strengthen young people's capacity to engage with and articulate their personal and shared visions for the future of their community.

Expected program outcomes 7.6.1 – a), b), c), and d).

Sustainable Environment Grants Program

The Sustainable Environment Grants Program received one application that met the criteria and is recommended for funding as outlined below:

Applicant

Middleton Grange Public School

Project

Lakeside Outdoor Learning Project

Description

Objective: Design a lakeside learning space to study sustainability, biodiversity and ecosystems. Students will be able to participate in ‘hands on experiences’, including habitat construction, vegetable cultivation and native plant integration to attract bees and birdlife. Classes will be designated their own garden bed and will be responsible for researching and maintaining their area across the year. The project is located next to an existing natural waterway adjacent to Middleton Grange Public School.

Outcomes:

·     Provide students with an outdoor space to learn in and learn from;

·     Provide access to an inclusive, natural space for all students;

·     Serve as a practical platform to advocate for sustainable practices; and

·     Teach students about the importance of environmental protection and the diversity of habitats for flora and fauna. 

Beneficiaries

·     474 students from Middleton Grange Public School and their families; and

·     Community members of Middleton Grange.

Assessment

Recommended for Funding - $5,000

The applicant’s project aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 2 Strengthening and Protecting Our Environment and meets the Sustainable Environment Grant Program’s funding priorities of environmental improvement and sustainable living. The project seeks to take advantage of a diverse environmental corridor to teach students about different habitats and ecosystems. The project offers hands on experiences for students to learn safe sustainable practices with tangible results in the garden beds.

Expected program outcomes 7.5.1 – a), b), c), d), and e).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

Economic

CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP**

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$100,000

$2,500

$10,000

$-7,500

COMMUNITY GRANTS

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$102,000

$81,560

Nil

$81,560

MATCHING GRANTS

Budget

Current balance

Recommended funding in this report

Rural Fire Assistance Donation (Council endorsed 11 December 2019)

Remaining

$200,000

$155,000

$18,000

$20,000

$117,000

SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT GRANTS*

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$75,000

$65,000

$5,000

$60,000

COMBINED FUNDING BALANCE

Combined Budget

Combined Balance

Total recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$477,000

$304,060

$33,000

$251,060

* Sustainable Environment Grants funding is via a rate levy and is only eligible to be used for the Sustainable Environment Grants Program.

** The shortfall of funding for eligible projects in the Corporate Sponsorship Program will be drawn from available funds in other grant programs.

Environment

Support schools and community groups to play an active role in reducing their impact on the environment and implementing environmentally sustainable actions.

Social

Support community organisations and groups to deliver services.

Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Local Government Act 1993 - s356.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Grants, Donations, and Corporate Sponsorship Policy (Under separate cover)   


1

Ordinary Meeting 26 February 2020

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 01

Investment Report January 2020

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Seek efficient and innovative methods to manage our resources

File Ref

026342.2020

Report By

John Singh - Accountant - Investments & Treasury Management

Approved By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer

 

 

executive summary

 

This report details Council’s investment portfolio.

 

As at 31 January 2020, Council held investments with a market value of $292 million.

 

The portfolio yield to the end of January 2020 is 114 basis points above the AusBond Bank Bill index.

 

 

AusBond Bank Bill Index (BBI)

Benchmark

1.40%

Portfolio yield

2.54%

Performance above benchmarks

1.14%

 

Return on investment for January 2020 was $677k lower than the budget.

 

Council’s investments and reporting obligations fully comply with the requirements of section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993 and clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

 

Council’s portfolio also fully complies with limits set out in its Investment Policy.

 

NSW TCorp Credit Committee requires that Council commits to its balanced investment framework as a condition to any loan. This means that Council will have to progressively decrease its investment in lower-rated ADI’s.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

 

 

REPORT

 

Clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the Responsible Accounting Officer must provide Council with a written report setting out details of all money that Council has invested under section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Council’s Portfolio

 

At 31 January 2020, Council held investments with a market value of $292 million. Council’s investment register detailing all its investments is provided as an attachment to this report. In summary, Council’s portfolio consisted of investments in:

 

         

 

The ratio of market value compared to face value of various debt securities is shown in the table below.

Asset Class

Jan-20

Jun-19

Senior Debts (FRN's ,TCD's & FRB)*

100.82%

100.76%

MBS (Reverse Mortgage Backed Securities)

59.33%

59.48%

T-Corp Unit Trusts

104.43%

103.65%

 

*Definition of terms

·      Transferrable Certificate of Deposit (TCD) - security issued with the same characteristics as a Term Deposit however it can be sold back (transferred) in to the market prior to maturity. A floating TCD pays a coupon linked to a variable benchmark (90 days BBSW).

·      Fixed Rate Bond (FRB) – returns Fixed Coupon (interest) Rate and is tradeable before maturity.

 

 

Council is fully compliant with the requirements of the Ministerial Investment Order including the grandfathering provisions. The grandfathering provisions state that Council may continue to hold to maturity, redeem or sell investments that comply with previous Ministerial Investment Orders. Any new investments must comply with the most recent Order. Council continues to closely monitor the investments in its portfolio to ensure continued compliance and minimal exposure to risk.

 

NSW TCorp Credit Committee requires that Council commits to its balanced investment framework as a condition to any loan. This means that Council will have to progressively decrease its investment in lower-rated ADI’s. Council staff will monitor and work with investment advisors to meet this requirement.

 

 

Portfolio Maturity Profile

 

The table below shows the percentage of funds invested at different durations to maturity.

 


 

 

Market Value by Issuer and Institution Policy limit as per Investment Policy

 

 

 

Overall Portfolio Credit Framework compliance to Investment Policy

 

 

 


Portfolio performance against relevant market benchmark.

 

Council’s Investment Policy prescribes the AusBond Bank Bill Index (ABBI) as a benchmark to measure return on cash and fixed interest securities. The ABBI represents the average daily yield of a parcel of bank bills. Historically there has been a positive correlation between changes in the cash rate and the resulting impact on the ABBI benchmark.

 

The portfolio yield to 31 January 2020 exceeded the AusBond Bank Bill index by 114 basis points (2.54% against 1.40 %).

 

Council portfolio continues to performance at above benchmark rates despite ongoing margin contraction and significantly lower market term deposit yields. Comparative yields for the previous months are charted below:

 

 

 

 


 

Performance of Portfolio Returns against Budget

 

Council’s investment income for January 2020 is lower than the budget by $677k.

 

 

Investment Portfolio at a Glance

 

 

Portfolio Performance

 

 

MCWB01114_0000[1]

The portfolio yield to 31 January 2020 exceeded the AusBond Bank Bill index by 114 basis points (2.54% against 1.40%).

Annual Income vs. Budget

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Council’s investment interest income is lower than the budget by $677k as at 31 January 2020 and will be closely monitored.

 

Investment Policy Compliance

 

Legislative Requirements

 

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Portfolio Credit Rating Limit

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Institutional Exposure Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Overall Portfolio Credit Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Term to Maturity Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

 

 

 

 

Economic Outlook – Reserve Bank of Australia

 

The Reserve Bank has left the official cash rate on hold at 0.75 per cent in its meeting on 4 February 2020 and indicated that it will be on hold in the foreseeable future.The current 0.75 per cent cash rate is at a historically low level and impacts returns on investment.

 

Certificate of Responsible Accounting Officer

 

The Chief Financial Officer, as Responsible Accounting Officer, certifies that the investments listed in the attached report have been made in accordance with section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 and Council’s Investment Policy at the time of their placement. The previous investments are covered by the grandfathering clauses of the current investment guidelines issued by the Minister for Local Government.

 

Independent verification by Head of Audit, Risk and Improvement (HARI)

 

Council has requested an on-going independent review of its investment portfolio by the Audit Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC) or its representative under delegated authority. The ARIC has agreed for its Chairperson to provide a certificate on a quarterly basis – the confirmation on investment to November 2019 is provided as an attachment to this report.

 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Council’s investment interest income is lower than the budget by $677k as at 31 January 2020 and will be closely monitored.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Council is fully compliant with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1993 – Investment Order (authorized investments) and with reporting requirements under clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Investment Portfolio - January 2020

2.         ARIC Certification of Investment Portfolio


1

CORP 01

Investment Report January 2020

Attachment 1

Investment Portfolio - January 2020

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


1

CORP 01

Investment Report January 2020

Attachment 2

ARIC Certification of Investment Portfolio

 

PDF Creator


1

Ordinary Meeting

26 February 2020

City Corporate Report

 

 

CORP 02

Reducing Red Tape - Development of Policies, Standards, Charters, Procedures and Strategies

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

028056.2020

Report By

Ellen Whittingstall - Coordinator Governance

Approved By

Chris White - Director City Corporate

 

 

Executive Summary

 

On 28 October 2019 Council endorsed the Development of Policies, Standards, Charters, Procedures and Strategies Framework (Framework), and directed the CEO to commence a process of workshopping existing policies with councillors, with a view to assessing each existing policy’s status under the framework by December 2020.

 

The following Council adopted policies for review were presented at the December and January Councillor Briefings, and are now referred to Council for status review.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Rescind the following policies:

1.1.    Liverpool Regional Museum Collecting and Care of Collections Policy;

1.2.    Liverpool City Library Collection Development and Information Access Policy;

1.3.    Footpath/ Nature Strip Mowing Policy;

1.4.    On- Site Stormwater Detention Policy;

1.5.    Development Construction Specifications (superseded); and

1.6.    Development Design Specification (superseded).

2.    Convert the following documents to CEO-approved standards under the Development of Policies, Standards, Charters, Procedures and Strategies Framework:

2.1.    Liverpool Regional Museum Collecting and Care of Collections Standards and Procedures;

 

2.2.    Liverpool City Library Collection Development and Information Access Standard and Procedures;

2.3.    Footpath/ Nature Strip Mowing Standard; and

2.4.    On-Site Stormwater Detention Standard.

 

 

REPORT

 

 

The Framework identifies five tiers of policy and procedural documents, and defines the features of each type of document. This will allow the policy burden on Council to be reduced, and mandates operational processes to be managed by the CEO.

 

In accordance with the Framework, and following briefings with councillors on 4 December 2019 and 1 February 2020, the following operational policies will be reviewed and adopted as listed:

 

i.    Liverpool Regional Museum Collecting and Care of Collections reviewed and rewritten as a Standard and Procedure;

ii.    Liverpool City Library Collection Development and Information Access reviewed and rewritten as a Standard and Procedure;

iii.   Footpath/ Nature Strip Mowing to be reviewed and rewritten as a Standard;

iv.  On- Site Stormwater Detention Policy reviewed and rewritten as a Standard with some sections included in Development Control Plan Part 1;

v.   Development Construction Specifications replaced by Auspec (Australian Standards) Document Suite. Additional work in the development of standardised documentation is being undertaken by the Western Sydney Planning Partnership;

vi.  Development Design Specification replaced by Auspec (Australian Standards) Document Suite. Additional work in the development of standardised documentation is being undertaken by the Western Sydney Planning Partnership.

 

It is recommended that Council rescind the above polices in question, and direct the reassignment of the proposed standards and procedures intended for approval by the CEO. The review and approval of these policies as Standards and Procedures will ensure that administrative and operational decisions are consistent with the strategic direction of Council.

 

 

 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Operate a well developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Footpath Naturestrip Mowing Policy

2.         On-Site Stormwater Detention Policy

3.         Liverpool City Library Collections and Information Access Policy (Under separate cover)

4.         Liverpool Regional Museum Collections Policy


1

CORP 02

Reducing Red Tape - Development of Policies, Standards, Charters, Procedures and Strategies

Attachment 1

Footpath Naturestrip Mowing Policy

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


1

CORP 02

Reducing Red Tape - Development of Policies, Standards, Charters, Procedures and Strategies

Attachment 2

On-Site Stormwater Detention Policy

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


1

CORP 02

Reducing Red Tape - Development of Policies, Standards, Charters, Procedures and Strategies

Attachment 4

Liverpool Regional Museum Collections Policy

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


1

Ordinary Meeting 26 February 2020

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 03

Budget Review - December 2019

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Meet the challenges of Liverpool’s growing population

File Ref

030828.2020

Report By

Earl Paradeza - Senior Management Accountant

Approved By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer

 

 

Executive Summary

 

In June 2019 Council adopted its 2019/20 operating budget with projected revenue of $305.8m and expenditure of $205.0m. In terms of the net operating result before grants and contributions provided for capital purposes, the Council budgeted for an operating deficit of $2.178m.

 

For Quarter 1 ended 30 September 2019, Council approved adjustments through resolutions and budget review process, resulting in a revised revenue target of $308.0m and expenditure of $205.8m. This translated to revised deficit net operating result before grants and contributions provided for capital purposes of $0.538m.

 

The review of Council’s budget at 31 December 2019 identified further adjustments and if approved will result in a $2.052m net operating deficit before grants and contributions for capital purposes for 2019/20 (Ref attachment 1 – Note D).

 

The second quarter budget review for 2019/20 has resulted in $19.186m overall decrease in Council’s capital expenditure program (Ref attachment 1 – Note E).

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council approves the identified budget variations in accordance with this report.

 

 

REport

 

Legislative Requirements

Clause 203(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires the Responsible Accounting Officer to provide a quarterly budget review not later than two months after each quarter's end. This report provides an overview of the results on the financial review for the quarter ended 31 December 2019.

 

Commentary

 

Operating Budget

 

In June 2019 Council adopted its 2019/20 operating budget with projected revenue of $305.8m and expenditure of $205.0m. In terms of the net operating result before grants and contributions provided for capital purposes, the Council budgeted for an operating deficit of $2.178m.

 

For Quarter 1 ended 30 September 2019, Council approved adjustments through resolutions and budget review process, resulting in a revised revenue target of $308.0m and expenditure of $205.8m. This translated to revised deficit net operating result before grants and contributions provided for capital purposes of $0.538m.

 

A comprehensive budget review conducted at 31 December 2019 has resulted in further budget adjustments, as detailed in Attachment 2. As part of the Budget Review, managers have conducted a review of their programs with a view to providing a revised forecast for the financial year ended 30 June 2020. Managers take into consideration events that have occurred to date and/or information that has become available since the adoption of the original budget and the impact of which provides the basis for the budget adjustments.

 

The review has resulted in $14.125m (Ref attachment 1 – Note A) decrease in total revenue mainly attributable to the following:

·    - $12.0m Delay in receiving the grants for Phillip Park Redevelopment of Lurnea Community Hub;

·    - $2.6m Capital grants for Georges River Foot Bridge Voyager Point project deferred to 2020/21 program year due to further investigation required to assee the loading capacity of the bridge;

·    - $1.8m Revenue from Liverpool Catholic Club (BMX Trail) is not anticipated until the work is fully completed next financial year;

·    -  $1.0m Lower returns on Council’s investment portfolio;

·    - $300k Unsuccessful grant application for Blackspot – Cartwright Avenue Miller;

·    - $300k Unsuccessful grant application for Heritage Conversation Program Collingwood House upgrade;

·    + $3.198m Final installment of approved HAF grant;

·    + $566k Additional grants towards land acquisition relating to Moorebank Voluntary Acquisition Scheme.

 

Total expenditure is projected to decrease by net $1.402m (Ref attachment 1 – Note B), mainly comprising:

·    - $2.2m Asbestos waste remediation works expenditure mainly at BMX Trail site is not expected to incur by 30 June 2020.

·    + $250k Expenditure on preparation of structure plan and planning proposal towards rezoning of Warwick Farm Precinct.

·    + $245k Sunk costs for Liverpool Civic Place initial design.

·    + $115k Funding for hosting the Economic Development Australia conference (to be recouped through registrations).

·    + $100k Aboriginal Cultural Heritage values assessment project and Collingwood Convervation and Restoration.

 

The proposed budget changes will increase the budgeted operating deficit before grants and contributions for capital purposes to $2.052m (Ref attachment 1 – Note D).

 

Capital Budget

 

In June 2019, Council approved its $156.3m capital works program for 2019/20. Council subsequently approved carry over of projects valued $16.6m that were planned but not completed in 2018/19.

 

In Quarter 1 budget review, capital expenditure program was increased by $1.982m mainly due to high priority CBD open space project deferred in 2018/19 program year, fit-out costs relating to Level 6, 35 Scott Street, and consultancy costs for Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage2 Master Plan.

 

The second quarter budget review has resulted in $19.2m decrease to Council’s capital expenditure program (Ref attachment 1 – Note E). The budget adjustments include the following:

·    - $14.9m Tenders for redevelopment of Lurnea Community Hub are being assessed. Construction is expected to start in June 2020 and the project will be delivered over two years.

·    - $5.6m Georges River Foot Bridge Voyager Point project deferred to 2020/21 program year due to further investigation required to assess the loading capacity of the bridge.

·    - $4.0m Design and construction of sports field at Cirillo Reserve will be delivered over two years. Construction has commenced and estimate of $4.0m will be expended this financial year.

·    + $3.2m Final land acquisition and road works funded by HAF grant

·    + $1.7m Funding required to settle the land acquisition for Basin 19 at Austral

 

At 31 December 2019, Council has a capital expenditure program of $155.4m as detailed in Attachment 3.

 

The YTD capital expenditure to 31 December 2019 was $40.8m.

 

The Table 1 below provides summary of the budget results:

 

 

Details of the proposed budget changes are provided in the attachments.

 

Attachments 1 - Quarter 2 Budget Review Summary (QBRS): This report presents a summary of Council's budgeted financial position at end of the quarter. The key indicators include:

1.   The revised budgeted income and expenditure for the year against the original estimate of annual income and expenditure as shown in Council’s Operational Plan

2.   Changes following Quarter 2 budget review

3.   The proposed revised budget for 2019/20 financial year

 

Attachments 2 – This report provides details of operating budget adjustments

 

Attachments 3 – This report provides details of capital budget adjustments

 

Attachment 4 & 5 – Grants Status Report: Has two components, first listing all annual grant submissions and second, listing all grants that have been applied for during the quarter detailing the project title, amount sought, funding body and status of the application. Council officers are continually seeking alternate sources of funding as opportunities arise.

 

Attachment 6 - Cash and Investments Statement: Providing a reconciliation of restricted and unrestricted funds to the level of Cash and Investments held as at 31 December 2019

 

Attachment 8 - Consultancy and Legal Expenses

 

Attachment 9 - Contracts and Other Expenses

 

Attachment 10 - City Development Fund and Environment Levy

 

This Report recommends that Council receives and notes the report and votes the budget variations in accordance with this report.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

The revised budget net operating result before Grants and Contributions following Quarter 2 Budget Review and Council resolutions to 31 December 2019 will be a deficit of $2.052m.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

Clause 203(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         QBRS - Consolidated Financial Results

2.         Operating Budget Adjustments

3.         Capital Budget Adjustments

4.         Grant Status Report - Applications

5.         Grant Status Report - Received

6.         Cash & Investment Report

7.         Key Performance Indicators

8.         Consultancy & Legal Expenses Budget Review Statement

9.         Contracts & Other Expenses Statements

10.       City Development Fund & Environment Levy Reserves


1

CORP 03

Budget Review - December 2019

Attachment 1

QBRS - Consolidated Financial Results

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


1

CORP 03

Budget Review - December 2019

Attachment 2

Operating Budget Adjustments

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


1

CORP 03

Budget Review - December 2019

Attachment 3

Capital Budget Adjustments

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


1

CORP 03

Budget Review - December 2019

Attachment 4

Grant Status Report - Applications

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


1

CORP 03

Budget Review - December 2019

Attachment 5

Grant Status Report - Received

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


1

CORP 03

Budget Review - December 2019

Attachment 6

Cash & Investment Report

 

PDF Creator


1

CORP 03

Budget Review - December 2019

Attachment 7

Key Performance Indicators

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


1

CORP 03

Budget Review - December 2019

Attachment 8

Consultancy & Legal Expenses Budget Review Statement

 

PDF Creator


1

CORP 03

Budget Review - December 2019

Attachment 9

Contracts & Other Expenses Statements

 

PDF Creator


1

CORP 03

Budget Review - December 2019

Attachment 10

City Development Fund & Environment Levy Reserves

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


1

Ordinary Meeting

26 February 2020

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 04

Draft Policy - Customer Engagement and Quality Assurance

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

033098.2020

Report By

Chris White - Director City Corporate

Approved By

Kiersten Fishburn - Chief Executive Officer

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The question of extending the recording of incoming calls across Council has been debated by Council on two occasions, in August 2019 and October 2019.

 

On the most recent occasion, several councillors raised concerns that the matter may be considered operational.

 

Staff have also raised legal and practical concerns related to call recording.

 

Staff have since obtained legal advice that confirms that call recording is an operational matter. Based on this advice, and Council’s newly-adopted policy framework, staff have prepared a revised policy document dealing with customer engagement and quality assurance.

 

This report outlines the process followed to date, and discusses the legal advice, the draft policy, and subsequent consultation.  The report also recommends adoption of the draft policy.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.   Adopt the draft Customer Engagement and Quality Assurance Policy, in place of the existing Customer Service and Communication Policy; and

 

2.   Direct the CEO to ensure preparation of appropriate operational standards to give effect to the policy within 6 months.

 

 

 

 

REPORT

 

On 28 August 2019, Council resolved (at NOM01) as follows:

 

That Council:

 

1.    Direct the CEO in consultation with relevant stakeholders to expand the current policy that allows for calls to be recorded in the customer service centre to include the whole organisation;

2.    Direct the CEO to report back to Council on the cost to implement such policy; and

3.    Direct the CEO to report back to Council in the October 2019 meeting on the above.

 

As previously reported to Council, an amended policy suite, anticipating call recording for most staff (but excluding staff for whom recording would have been either illegal or impractical), was thereafter prepared and submitted to consultation with staff and the unions.

 

Consultation revealed a highly negative view of the proposed policy suite from all parties involved. The results of the consultation were reported to Council on 28 October 2019 (at CEO03).

 

The matter was debated, during which staff understood Council’s primary concerns to be as follows:

 

1.    That some councillors had concerns that the question of call recording was an operational matter;

2.    That the United Services Union were opposed to the draft policy as presented, but had expressed possible support for a policy that adopted call recording for all staff, with no exceptions; and

3.    That Campbelltown City Council may already be undertaking business-wide call recording.

Council subsequently resolved as follows:

 

That:

 

1.    Council defer this item until further discussions are held with the relevant stakeholders;

2.    A policy be presented to Council at the second February 2020 meeting for Council’s consideration; and

3.    Council notes that it is believed that Campbelltown City Council has a policy similar to what Liverpool City Council is trying to achieve.

 

Staff have subsequently reconsidered the matter.  The question of whether the matter is operational was been raised by several parties, and staff have obtained external legal advice on the question of the possible operational classification of call recording.

 

This legal advice, included as Attachment 1 to this report, concludes that call recording is an operational matter.

 

Staff also contacted Campbelltown City Council, and confirmed that as of December 2019, Campbelltown was trialing call recording for customer service only. Council-wide call recording was not in place, and was not being considered.

 

As a result of the above, and consistent with Council’s newly adopted policy framework, staff have prepared a revised Customer Engagement and Quality Assurance Policy (included as Attachment 2). This draft has been subject to consultation with Council staff (via Council’s Joint Consultative Committee), and with the relevant unions. The response is positive from all parties, though there is a clear understanding that operational standards will be required, and that these standards will require further consultation prior to adoption.

 

Operational standards will include clearly defined service level expectations for all key customer service metrics, in place of the existing Customer Service and Communication Policy (included as Attachment 3).  These service levels, once established, will be monitored and tracked, and staff will be accountable for meeting expected standards.

 

Staff recommend that the draft policy be adopted in place of the existing Customer Service and Communication Policy, and that the proposed operational standards be developed to give effect to the stated policy objective of achieving best-practice standards in customer engagement and quality assurance across Council.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Support access and services for people with a disability.

Deliver high quality services for children and their families.


Civic Leadership

Undertake communication practices with the community and stakeholders across a range of media.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

Local Government Act 1993, s.223, 335.

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Legal Advice - Call Recording - Scott Nash, Barrister (11 February 2020)

2.         Draft Customer Engagement and Quality Assurance Policy

3.         Customer Service and Communication Policy - May 2014  


1

CORP 04

Draft Policy - Customer Engagement and Quality Assurance

Attachment 1

Legal Advice - Call Recording - Scott Nash, Barrister (11 February 2020)

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator

 

 


1

CORP 04

Draft Policy - Customer Engagement and Quality Assurance

Attachment 2

Draft Customer Engagement and Quality Assurance Policy

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


1

CORP 04