COUNCIL AGENDA

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

25 November 2020

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You are hereby notified that an Ordinary Council Meeting of Liverpool City Council will be held online on Wednesday, 25 November 2020 commencing at 6.00pm.

 

Liverpool City Council Meetings are livestreamed onto Council’s website and remain on Council’s website for a period of 12 months.  If you have any enquiries, please contact Council and Executive Services on 8711 7584.

A close up of a logo

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Dr Eddie Jackson

ACTING CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

 

 


 

 

 


Order of Business

 

                                                                                                              PAGE     TAB

Opening

Acknowledgment of Country and Prayer

Apologies

Condolences

Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council Meeting held on 27 October 2020............................................................... 7

Declarations of Interest

Public Submissions

Mayoral Report

NIL

Notices of Motion Of Rescission

NIL

Chief Executive Officer Report

NIL

City Economy and Growth Report

EGROW 01    Post Exhibition Report - Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 85) - Rezone land at 146 Newbridge Road, Moorebank from RE2 Private Recreation to R3 Medium Density Residential and amend development standards........... 54......... 1

EGROW 02    Post exhibition report - Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 69) and Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 (Amendment 36) - Signage in the B3 and B4 zones............................................................................................ 62......... 2

EGROW 03    Street Naming Request - Austral.................................................................... 69......... 3

EGROW 04    Liverpool Health and Innovation Trade Delegation to New Zealand 2021.... 73......... 4

EGROW 05    Planning Proposal - Moore Point  (to be provided in addendum booklet)

City Community and Culture Report

COM 01          Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship............................................. 81......... 5

COM 02          Post Public Exhibition report-Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage II Masterplan   89 6

City Corporate Report

CORP 01        Investment Report October 2020................................................................. 115......... 7

CORP 02        Council Meeting Dates - January to December 2021.................................. 124......... 8

CORP 03        Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy...................................................... 128......... 9

CORP 04        Budget Review - September 2020............................................................... 147....... 10

CORP 05        Proposed Funding - Edmondson Park Basin 14.......................................... 174....... 11

CORP 06        Mayoral Direction pursuant to Section 226(d) of the Local Government Act 1993  179 12

CORP 07        Annual Financial Statements 2019/2020 (to be provided in addendum booklet)

City Presentation Report

NIL

City Infrastructure and Environment Report

INF 01             Revision and Update of the Environment Advisory Committee Charter...... 184....... 13

INF 02             Management of Contaminated Lands.......................................................... 199....... 14

Committee Reports

CTTE 01         Minutes of the Liverpool Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held on 18 August 2020.............................................................................................................. 209....... 15

CTTE 02         Minutes of the Liverpool Access Committee meeting held 8 October 2020 217....... 16

CTTE 03         Minutes of Strategic Panel Meeting held on 12 October 2020.................... 234....... 17

CTTE 04         Minutes of the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee Meeting held on 23 October 2020................................................................................................ 241....... 18

CTTE 05         Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee meeting held on Friday 30 October 2020 256        19

CTTE 06         Minutes of the Tourism and CBD Committee meeting held on 20 October 2020    261 20

Questions with Notice

QWN 01          Question with Notice - Clr Balloot - Mental Health Issues........................... 268....... 21

QWN 02          Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Schoeffel Park.................................... 275....... 22

QWN 03          Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Board walk / bank stabilisation in the Shepherd Street Precinct............................................................................. 278....... 23

QWN 04          Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Amazon.............................................. 280....... 24

QWN 05          Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Valuation of Property Surrounding Western Sydney Airport.............................................................................................. 285....... 25

QWN 06          Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Delivering a Multicultural Park for Liverpool   288 26

QWN 07          Question with Notice - Clr Ayyad - Civic Place............................................ 291....... 27

QWN 08          Question with Notice - Clr Kaliyanda - Liverpool Bike Plan: Implementation Status 293         28

QWN 09          Question with Notice - Clr Kaliyanda - Green Star Rating Scheme Changes 294      29

Presentations by Councillors

 

Notices of Motion

NOM 01          Council leading in good governance practices............................................. 295....... 30

 

 

 

Council in Closed Session

The following items are listed for consideration by Council in Closed Session with the public excluded, in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 1993 as listed below:

 

CONF 01    Report back - Out of Office Hours Compliance Officers

Reason:     Item CONF 01 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(a) of the Local Government Act because it contains personal matters concerning particular individuals (other than councillors).

 

CONF 02    Dedication to Council of Lots 25 and 26 DP1220035 Somme Avenue, Edmondson Park for drainage purposes

Reason:     Item CONF 02 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(c) of the Local Government Act because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

CONF 03    2021 Australia Day Awards

Reason:     Item CONF 03 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(a) of the Local Government Act because it contains personal matters concerning particular individuals (other than councillors).

 

CONF 04    Review and update on potential Council surplus land

Reason:     Item CONF 04 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(c) of the Local Government Act because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

CONF 05    Revenue Pricing Policy (Fees and Charges) - Review of Telecommunications Infrastructure Facilities Fees

Reason:     Item CONF 05 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(c) of the Local Government Act because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

CONF 06    Liverpool Animal Shelter

Reason:     Item CONF 06 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(c) of the Local Government Act because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.  

Close


 

MINUTES OF THE Ordinary Meeting

HELD ON 27 October 2020

 

 

PRESENT (VIA VIDEO CONFERENCING):

Mayor Wendy Waller

Councillor Ayyad

Councillor Balloot

Councillor Hadchiti

Councillor Hadid

Councillor Hagarty

Councillor Harle

Councillor Kaliyanda

Councillor Karnib

Councillor Rhodes

Councillor Shelton

Dr Eddie Jackson, Acting Chief Executive Officer

Mr George Hampouris, Acting Director City Corporate

Ms Tina Sangiuliano, Acting Director City Community and Culture

Mr David Smith, Acting Director City Economy and Growth

Mr Peter Patterson, Director City Presentation

Mr Raj Autar, Director City Infrastructure and Environment

Mr Vishwa Nadan, Chief Financial Officer

Mr John Morgan, Director Property and Commercial  Development

Mr James Ng, Acting General Counsel, Manager Governance Legal and Procurement

Mr Shaun Beckley, Manager Infrastructure Planning

Mr George Georgakis, Manager Council and Executive Services

Ms Susan Ranieri, Coordinator Council and Executive Services (minutes)

 

The meeting commenced at 6.01pm

 

 

STATEMENT REGARDING WEBCASTING OF MEETING

The Mayor reminded everyone that in accordance with Council’s Code of Meeting Practice the meeting is being livestreamed.

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF COUNTRY, PRAYER OF COUNCIL AND AFFIRMATION TO BE READ BY

 

The prayer of the Council was read by the Acting Chief Executive Officer, Dr Eddie Jackson.

 

 

APOLOGIES

Nil.

 

CONDOLENCES

 

Mr Arthur Ernest Willmington (read by Clr Harle)

 

Arthur Ernest Willmington “Artie” was born in Penrith on 14th October 1929. He was the 8th born of a family of 9.

 

Artie lived all his life in Luddenham.

 

His parents, Clara and Sid, had a dairy farm and from a young age, 6 years old, he got up to bring the cows in for milking, go to school, and come home to help on the farm.

 

Aarti loved the outdoor life and after he married, he had a 50 acre farm of his own. He made his farm into a huge success but decided at 70 years of age it was time to retire.

 

For four years, before selling the farm, he started growing roses to sell to raise funds for cancer research and for the Cancer Council of Australia. This he continued at his new home and for the past 24 years this has been what he wanted to do. He loved the peacefulness of his garden but he was always happy to pass on his knowledge of gardening.

 

Two weeks before his passing he was diagnosed with bladder cancer but on 1st October he suffered a heart attack.

 

His funeral was held in Luddenham Uniting Church and laid to rest in the adjoining cemetery.

 

I would suggest Council sends a letter of condolence to his family.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion                                   Moved: Mayor Waller           Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That Council writes to the family of Mr Willmington expressing our condolences for their loss.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

Confirmation of Minutes

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting held on 30 September 2020 be confirmed as a true record of that meeting.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

Declarations of Interest

 

Clr Ayyad declared a non-pecuniary, less than significant interest in the following item: 

 

Item:          CONF 01 - Order of Liverpool Awards.

 

Reason:     Clr Ayyad’s husband was nominated for one of the awards.

 

Clr Ayyad remained in the virtual meeting for the duration of this item. 

 

Public Forum

Presentation – items not on agenda

Nil.

Representation – items on agenda

Nil.

 

MOTION OF URGENCY

 

ITEM NO:       MOU 01

SUBJECT:     122 Atkinson Street, Liverpool

 

In accordance with Clause 8.3 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice, the Chairperson Mayor Waller, ruled the following motion as urgent, and as such it was dealt with at the meeting and is shown below:

 

Background

 

On 11 August 2020, Council was notified by members of the community of the impeding auction of 122 Atkinson Street, Liverpool. The property is a single storey timber weatherboard cottage, advertised as an opportunity for knock down and rebuild.

 

The cottage, known as Stephenville, was built in 1917 by the Voluntary Workers’ Association for Mrs Boyland, wife of Private Harry Boyland with two children. The cottage was built at a cost of £269 and furniture and internal fittings were provided by Henry Bull and Co and the Challenge Woollen Mills.

 

Private Harry Boyland served with the 11th Australian Infantry Battalion, Australian Imperial Force and died on the battlefields of France on 30 May 1916.

 

 

The building is representative of a 1900s residential dwelling, a rarity within the Liverpool area, but also of the community spirit of wartime Liverpool. The community came together to support a war widow and a family and provide her with a house recognised in the Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate as a “strongly built structure of four rooms and the necessary outhouses…the materials costing in the vicinity of 269 pounds.”

 

This building is more than just a simple cottage but embodies the history of Liverpool and its community and Council needs time to properly assess the heritage significance of the building and to determine whether the building should be listed on Council’s heritage register.

 

Liverpool City Council may issue an Interim Heritage Order, which is an order that prevents the building from being demolished for an initial period of 6 months to allow for a full and detailed assessment of the building’s heritage significance.

 

The order can be extended for a further 6 months if Council decides to list the building and agrees to prepare a planning proposal to amend the heritage register in the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan.

 

While the future of the cottage remains undecided, this is the right time to assess and determine whether we should protect a piece of Liverpool’s history.

 

COUNCIL DECISION:

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Hagarty

 

That Council:

 

1.    Direct the Acting Chief Executive Officer to issue an Interim Heritage Order on 122 Atkinson Street, Liverpool in accordance with Section 25 of the Heritage Act 1977;

 

2.    Allocate $5,000 to engage a heritage consultant to undertake an independent assessment of heritage significance for 122 Atkinson Street, Liverpool; and

 

3.    Receive a further report, prior to June 2021, outlining the assessment of significance of the building and recommendations for future action.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Clr Hadchiti asked that he be recorded as having voted against the motion.


 

MAYORAL REPORT

Nil.

 

Chief Executive Officer Report

 

ITEM NO:       CEO 01

FILE NO:        270354.2020

SUBJECT:     COVID-19 - Liverpool City Council Response

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Harle                  Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

  1. Note that the waiver for outdoor dining fees ceased on 31 August 2020 and that a waiver of fees totalling approximately $21,600 was provided to existing outdoor café permit holders;

 

  1. Note that the waiver for rental abatements for Council’s retail and small tenants ceased on 31 August 2020 with a total rental abatement of approximately $160,130 having been provided;

 

  1. Apply the provisions of the Retail and other Commercial Leases (COVID-19) Regulation for Council’s tenants (subject to qualification) in relation to extending rent relief for the period 1 November to 31 December 2020;

 

  1. Note that 415 free car parking permits and pass cards have been issued by Council to essential workers at a value of $527,863;

 

  1. Note that the provision of free permit based carparking at Northumberland carpark ceased on 30 September 2020;

 

  1. Extends the provision of free pass card parking at Warren Serviceway carpark until 31 October 2020;

 

  1. Approve the end date associated with Initiative 7 to be 30 November 2020; and

 

8.    Recommence enforcement for parking meters now.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED. 

 


 

City Economy and Growth Report

 

ITEM NO:       EGROW 01

FILE NO:        230146.2020

SUBJECT:     Draft Western Sydney Aerotropolis Joint Contributions Plan 2020

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Harle                  Seconded: Clr Hagarty

 

That Council:

 

1.    Exhibits the draft Joint Aerotropolis Contributions Plan 2020 and background report for a minimum of 28 days in accordance with the provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

 

2.    Delegates to the Acting Chief Executive Officer authority to finalise the Aerotropolis Contributions Plan if no submissions in opposition are received.

 

3.    Exhibits draft Amendment 2 to the Liverpool Contributions Plan 2009 for a minimum 28 days in accordance with the provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

 

4.    Delegates to the Acting Chief Executive Officer authority to finalise Amendment 2 to the Liverpool Contributions Plan 2009.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

Vote for:           Mayor Waller, Clr Ayyad, Clr Balloot, Deputy Mayor Hadid, Clr Hagarty, Clr Harle, Clr Kaliyanda, Clr Karnib, Clr Rhodes and Clr Shelton.

Vote against:   Clr Hadchiti.

 

 


ITEM NO:       EGROW 02

FILE NO:        261147.2020

SUBJECT:     Post Exhibition Report - Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 Amendment 77 - Additional permitted use of 'Car Park' at Collimore Park, Liverpool.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Harle                  Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That Council:

 

1.    Notes the Gateway determination for Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 Amendment 77 and the submissions received from State agencies and from the public exhibition;

 

2.    Proceeds with Amendment 77 and delegates authority to the Acting Chief Executive Officer (or his delegate) to liaise with the NSW Parliamentary Counsel’s Office and the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment to finalise the amendment; and

 

3.    Notifies the submitters of Council’s decision.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for the motion.

 


ITEM NO:       EGROW 03

FILE NO:        262628.2020

SUBJECT:     Liverpool Design Excellence Panel Charter and Procedure

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That Council:

 

  1. Endorse the minor amendments to the Design Excellence Panel Charter and Procedure and subject to the following additional amendments to Clauses 4.1 and 5.1 as shown below:

 

i.    To replace the first paragraph of Representations of the DEP, point 4.1 (as shown in the report) as follows, so that it now reads:

 

4.1 Membership

 

The DEP shall comprise three (3) high-level and respected professionals who are or have been involved in the design of recent (1-5 years) of major projects. Such members shall have extensive expertise in specific urban design and sustainable and liveable communities that addresses the needs and conditions found in Western Sydney and also possess extensive qualifications in at least one or more of the following professions:

 

(a)    Urban Design;

(b)    Architecture;

(c)    Landscape Architecture; and

(d)    Urban Planning

 

A DEP member cannot be employed by Council, including Council officers and elected Councillors, in accordance with the requirements of State Environmental Planning Policy No. 65 (SEPP No. 65).

 

ii.   To replace the first paragraph of DEP Appointment and Selection for DEP Meetings (as shown in the report) in point 5.1 so that it now reads as follows:

 

5.1   Tender Process

 

Council will advertise and establish a short list via a tender or an expression of interest process which will be presented to a council meeting for approval. Members will then be appointed from the approved short list by the CEO based on their qualifications and experience, and in the absence of any real or potential pecuniary or non-pecuniary conflict of interest.

 

2.    Seek quotations from suitably qualified industry representatives to become members of the Liverpool Design Excellence Panel for a two-year period.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.


ITEM NO:       EGROW 04

FILE NO:        263708.2020

SUBJECT:     Amendment 2 to Liverpool Contributions Plan 2008 - Edmondson Park

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That Council:

 

1.    Exhibits Amendment 2 to Liverpool Contributions Plan 2008 – Edmondson Park for 28 days in accordance with the requirements of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000; and

 

2.    Delegates to the Acting Chief Executive Officer authority to finalise Amendment 2 to Liverpool Contributions Plan 2008 – Edmondson Park.

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 


ITEM NO:       EGROW 05

FILE NO:        266182.2020

SUBJECT:     Parking on Verges and Nature Strips

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadid                 Seconded: Clr Hagarty

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receive and note the report; and

 

2.    Makes representations to the State Government to amend the relevant regulations to allow discretion for parking on verges and nature strips. 

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

Clrs Shelton and Hadchiti asked that their names be recorded as having voted against the motion. 


ITEM NO:       EGROW 06

FILE NO:        275167.2020

SUBJECT:     Draft Cumberland Plain Conservation Plan Submission

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That Council endorses the submission on the Draft Cumberland Plain Conservation Plan.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


 

City Community and Culture Report

 

ITEM NO:       COM 01

FILE NO:        162295.2020

SUBJECT:     Draft Miller Social Infrastructure Masterplan

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the report;

 

2.    Adopts the Draft Masterplan for public exhibition for community information and feedback for a period of 28 days;

 

3.    Delegates to the A/CEO the finalisation of the draft Masterplan if no submissions are received; or receive a further report outlining details of the submissions received at the conclusion of the exhibition period; and

 

4.    Subject to Council’s adoption of the Masterplan, develops a staged implementation strategy by June 2021.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


CITY CORPORATE REPORTS

ITEM NO:       CORP 01

FILE NO:        265086.2020

SUBJECT:     Tabling of the Annual Pecuniary Interest Returns for Councillors and Designated Persons

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Hadchiti

 

Council notes that:

 

1.    The annual pecuniary interest returns of Councillors and designated persons, as at 30 June 2020, are now tabled before the Council in accordance with clause 4.25 of the Model Code of Conduct and available to view during business hours the next business day, 28th October, through Council and Executive Services; and

 

2.    A redacted version will be published on the Council website. 

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       CORP 02

FILE NO:        267754.2020

SUBJECT:     Investment Report September 2020

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


 

Committee Reports

ITEM NO:       CTTE 01

FILE NO:        255392.2020

SUBJECT:     Liverpool Sports Committee Minutes of meeting held 27 August 2020

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Karnib

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Liverpool Sports Committee meeting held on 27 August 2020.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 02

FILE NO:        256353.2020

SUBJECT:     Community Safety and Crime Prevention Advisory Committee Minutes 03-09-2020

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Karnib

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Community Safety and Crime Prevention Advisory Committee Meeting held on 3 September 2020.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 03

FILE NO:        245052.2020

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee meeting held on 2 September 2020

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Karnib

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee Meeting held on 2 September 2020.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 04

FILE NO:        262694.2020

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee meeting held on 17 August 2020

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Karnib

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee Meeting held on 17 August 2020.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 05

FILE NO:        271798.2020

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee meeting held on 23 September 2020

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Karnib

 

That Council adopts the following recommendations of the Committee:

 

Item 1 - Adams Road, Luddenham –  Road reconstruction including installation of a roundabout at the Adams Road/Aton Road intersection.  

 

·    Council approves the signs and linemarking scheme for the Adams Road and Anton Road reconstruction.

 

·    Supports the proposed roundabout at the Adams Road and Anton Road intersection.

 

·    Detailed design of the roundabout is to consider tree planting in consultation with Western Sydney Airport.

 

·    Detailed design is to be submitted to Council and forwarded to TfNSW for review prior to construction.

 

Item 2 - Moondarra Drive, West Hoxton - Clancy Catholic College Stage 7 Design Pack Carparking.

 

·    Council approves the design drawings of the parking spaces and associated signs and linemarking scheme.

 

Item 3 - Junction Road east of Stockton Avenue, Moorebank -  request for an additional speed hump.

 

·    Council approves the installation of a threshold across the section between Stockton Avenue and Renton Avenue, close to Wilkes Avenue.

 

·    Community consultation is to be carried out prior to installation.

 

Item 4 - 227-229 George Street, Liverpool - request for No Stopping restriction.

 

·    Council approves the replacement of the existing loading zone at the rear of 227-229 George Street, Liverpool with a no stopping zone.

 

Item 5 - Eleventh Avenue, Austral – reconstruction of the road section in front of St Anthony of Padua Catholic School.

 

·    Council approves the proposed children’s crossing and associated signs and linemarking scheme.

 

·    Detailed design is to be submitted to TfNSW for review prior to construction.

 

Item 6 - Buchan Avenue, Edmondson Park – Road construction including signs and linemarking scheme.

 

·    Council approves the detailed design drawings including signs and linemarking scheme.

 

·    Detailed design drawing is to be submitted to TfNSW for review prior to construction.

 

Item 7 - Beech Road, Casula - Request for timed on-street parking at 245 Beech Road in front of the Macchiato & Co café.

 

·    Council approves 2 x 30-minute on-street parking spaces east of the “No Stopping” sign close to the Beech Road and Berriwerri Place roundabout intersection.

 

Item 8 - Reilly Street, Lurnea – Proposed median Island extension to wombat crossing and raised threshold.

 

·    Council approves the median island extension to wombat crossing and raised threshold.

 

Item 9 - McIver Avenue, Middleton Grange – Road extension including signs and linemarking scheme.

 

·    Council approves the McIver Avenue road extension and associated signs and linemarking scheme.

 

·    The road extension is to include a gate (at the entry to the park) to be closed at night.

 

Item 10 - Various Streets – Request for Traffic calming devices.

 

·    Council approves the installation of separation and edge linemarkings along the section of Ardennes Avenue from Okinawa Road, Edmondson Park to the southern end of the road.

 

·    Speed classification is to be carried out to assess whether additional traffic calming devices are required.

 

·    Council to consider road improvement on the eastern side of Shepherd Street between Atkinson Street to Powerhouse Road, Liverpool.

 

·    Council to carry out speed classifications along Webster Road, Ardennes Avenue and Christiansen Boulevard to assess the need for traffic calming devices. 

 

Item 11 - Bigge Street, between Elizabeth Street and Campbell Street, Liverpool – Minor Traffic Management Works.

 

·    Council supports the re-linemarking of double-barrier and edge lines and installation of entry thresholds.

 

Item 12 - Items Approved Under Delegated Authority.

 

·    Council notes the traffic facilities approved under delegated authority between 22 July 2020 and 23 September 2020.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.


ITEM NO:       CTTE 06

FILE NO:        272255.2020

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Intermodal Precinct Committee meeting held on 1 September 2020

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Karnib

 

That Council:

 

1.   Receives and notes the minutes of the Intermodal Precinct Committee; and

 

2.   Endorse the recommendations in the minutes.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Mayor Waller called a recess at 7.38pm.

 

Mayor Waller resumed the meeting at 7.49pm.

 


 

Questions with Notice

ITEM NO:       QWN 01

FILE NO:        273287.2020

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - JobKeeper and JobSeeker

 

Please address the following:

 

With JobKeeper and JobSeeker set to be reduced or removed for many come October, do we have approximate numbers on:

1.      Number of businesses in Liverpool who will lose JobKeeper?

2.      Number of people they employ?

3.      Number of people on JobSeeker in Liverpool?

 

Response

 

According to federal government figures there are at least 27,000 people in the Liverpool LGA on income support through JobKeeper, JobSeeker or Youth Allowance. The following information is the most up-to-date data, as at 30 September 2020, released by the Australian Tax Office and Profile ID.

 

JobKeeper

 

In June 2020 there were 10,354 applications processed for JobKeeper in the Liverpool LGA. The table below, from data collated from Australian Tax Office, shows the number of organisations that have had their applications processed. Because this is an organisation count, rather than number of employees, it is unclear how many Liverpool residents are receiving JobKeeper.

 

Postcode

April

May

June

2168

963

987

1003

2179

372

397

410

2556

156

163

163

2171

1140

1177

1220

2170

4070

4193

4293

2178

235

251

259

2565

917

971

987

2174

229

238

236

2745

780

835

864

2173

294

300

299

2172

87

94

97

2557

473

513

523

TOTAL

9716

10119

10354

 

On 21 July 2020 the Government announced it would extend the JobKeeper payment until 28 March 2021, and that it would target businesses and not-for-profits which continue to be significantly impacted by the Corona Virus.

 

From 28 September 2020, eligibility for JobKeeper will be decreased and paid at two rates.

 

From 28 September 2020 to 3 January 2021 the payment will be reduced from $1500 a fortnight to $1200 a fortnight for eligible employees who were working for 20 hours or more a week. For employees who were working less than 20 hours a week, the payment will be reduced to $750 a fortnight.

 

From 4 January 2021 to 28 March 2021 the payment for employees working more than 20 hours a week will be further reduced to $1000 a fortnight. For employees working less than 20 hours a fortnight the payment will be reduced to $650.

 

Council officers have requested projections and modelling about the impact the changes would have on the economy from the federal Treasury via a contact at Ausindustry. Officers received the following response:

 

“We put your request to Treasury (federal) but unfortunately, they do not have the projections data you specifically require.

 

“The additional modelling information you are seeking is unlikely to be publicly available and as you understand, any such data would vary significantly across the nation plus the complex economic interactions across many supply chains and demands are constantly changing.”

 

JobKeeper payment schedule

(Source: https://www.ato.gov.au/General/JobKeeper-Payment/Payment-rates/)

 

Dates

Staff who worked on average less than 20 hours a fortnight

Staff who worked on average more than 20 hours a fortnight

30 March 2020 - 27 September 2020

$1500/fortnight

$1500/fortnight

28 September 2020 - 3 January 2021

$750/fortnight

$1200/fortnight

4 January 2021 – 28 March 2021

$650/fortnight

$1000/fortnight

 

JobSeeker

 

In August 2020 (latest information available) there were 16,930 people on JobSeeker or Youth Allowance (11.2 per cent of 15-64-year-olds). During the same period 8.9 per cent of the NSW 15-64-year-olds were on JobSeeker or Youth Allowance.

 

Figures from Profile ID show JobSeeker and Youth Allowance figures climbing rapidly during April to stabilise from May onwards to more than 16,000.

 

(Source: https://profile.id.com.au/cws/job-seeker?EndYear=201909)

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 02

FILE NO:        273290.2020

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Western Sydney Aerotropolis State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) 2020

 

Please address the following:

 

1.         With the release of the Western Sydney Aerotropolis State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) 2020, have any major implications been identified that effect our LGA?

 

Response:

 

The SEPP was released by the NSW Government on 13 September 2020, as part of the finalisation of the Western Sydney Aerotropolis Planning Package. The SEPP came into effect on 1 October 2020 and rezoned the initial precincts within the Liverpool LGA (Aerotropolis Core, Agribusiness, Badgerys Creek and Wianamatta-South Creek precincts).

 

In addition to the SEPP gazettal, the following documents were released as part of the Western Sydney Aerotropolis Planning Package:  

·           Western Sydney Aerotropolis Plan (WSAP)

·           Western Sydney Aerotropolis Development Control Plan (DCP) Phase 1

·           Section 9.1 Ministerial Direction: Implementation of the Western Sydney Aerotropolis Plan

 

The final planning package is available on the NSW Planning Portal:

 

https://www.planningportal.nsw.gov.au/draftplans/made-and-finalised/western-sydney-aerotropolis-planning-package

 

The SEPP contains a number of aviation safeguarding clauses, the majority of which extend well beyond the Aerotropolis boundary, and therefore apply to land across the Liverpool LGA, as well as surrounding LGAs. These clauses relate to aircraft noise, building wind shear and turbulence, wildlife hazards, wind turbines, lighting, airspace operations, and public safety areas.

 

Notably, Clause 19 of the SEPP relating to aircraft noise, has implications for the Liverpool LGA and surrounding LGAs, as the clause takes a precautionary approach to managing aircraft noise by placing further restrictions on developments when compared to clauses in Council’s LEPs. Details of the restrictions are as follows.

 

 

 

 

Development within ANEC 20+ Contours

 

Clause 19 (Aircraft Noise) of the SEPP prohibits development of new noise sensitive uses (residential accommodation, education establishments, places of public worship etc.) within ANEC 20 and above contours. Despite this clause, if at the time of the SEPP’s commencement, a dwelling house was permissible, and there were no dwellings on the land, the SEPP allows its development to be permissible.

 

Prior to the SEPP being gazetted, the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan (LLEP 2008), Clause 7.18 permitted the development of residential accommodation on land subject to ANEF 20 contours (but less than 25). Development was, however, required to meet relevant Australian Standards for indoor design sound levels in relation to aircraft noise intrusion. Under the LLEP 2008, the development of residential accommodation is prohibited on land identified as being subject to ANEF 25 and above. 

 

Development beyond ANEC 20 Contours

 

Additionally, Clause 19 (Aircraft Noise) of the SEPP requires the development of noise sensitive uses beyond land subject to the ANEC to be built to the Australian Standards. This requirement applies to all new noise sensitive uses within the boundary of the Obstacle Limitation Surface Map. This map extends approximately 13km from the airport site, therefore reaching east to Prestons, and encompassing the growth areas of Austral, Leppington and part of Edmondson Park.  

 

Clause 19(5)(b) of the SEPP has been deferred by the Government and will commence on 26 April 2021.

 

Other Notable SEPP Clauses which could affect developments

 

Wildlife Hazards

 

To manage risk of wildlife strike, the SEPP restricts certain land uses within 3km of the airport, including turf farming, livestock processing and outdoor waste or resource management facilities.

 

Additionally, certain land uses within 13km of the airport will require additional consideration in relation to wildlife management at the development application stage. This includes applications for plant nurseries, sewerage treatment plants and water storage facilities.    

 

Complying Development

 

Complying development under SEPP (Exempt and Complying Development Codes) 2008 is not enabled within the initial precincts under the Aerotropolis SEPP. Instead, complying development is enabled following the approval of a master plan.

 

 

A master plan is to specify which development is to be undertaken as complying development and set development controls for its assessment criteria as complying development. Exempt Development Codes still apply within the Aerotropolis, subject to minor variations to safeguard aviation operations (e.g. reduce wildlife attraction) and meet the Parkland City vision (e.g. limit extent of hardstand space).

 

The SEPP also contains various provisions regarding flooding, native vegetation, heritage, design excellence and transport corridors. 

 

Aerotropolis Precinct Planning

 

The Western Sydney Planning Partnership are continuing to develop precinct plans for the initial precincts identified in the WSAP. These are anticipated to go on public exhibition in late 2020, early 2021. The Partnership are also developing a comprehensive Development Control Plan which will replace the Phase 1 DCP. This DCP will also be subject to public exhibition.  


ITEM NO:       QWN 03

FILE NO:        281539.2020

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Balloot - Mental Health Issues

 

2020 has been an extremely stressful year for many; fire, floods and now COVID.

Many in our community continue to suffer with mental health issues.

Adolescence and young individuals are particularly vulnerable to external pressures of every life.

 

Please address the following:

 

With the added unprecedented pressures:

 

  1. What initiatives/programs has Council supported to assist the community and particularly adolescence and young person’s when dealing with mental health issues?

 

  1. Has Council conducted a review of services available to the local community?

 

  1. What initiatives has Council implemented to support the mental health of staff during this unprecedented time?

 

A response to these questions will be provided in the 25 November 2020 Council meeting business papers.

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 04

FILE NO:        281543.2020

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Schoeffel Park

 

Background

 

Since it recently opened, Schoeffel Park has been a big success. Many families are using the park and enjoying its facilities.

 

The demand has placed increased pressure on the surrounding road network.

 

There has been at least one accident and a number of near misses involving both cars and pedestrians.

 

Questions

 

Please address the following:

  1. Do subsequent phases of the development of Schoeffel Park include car parking?

 

  1. If so, how many spots and where will they be located?

 

  1. What traffic treatments are being considered to the surrounding road network, in particular Strzlecki Drive?

 

  1. When are these traffic treatments expected to be delivered?

 

  1. What consideration is given to the impact of the surrounding road and path networks when planning and funding work to parks?

 

A response to these questions will be provided in the 25 November 2020 Council meeting business papers.

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 05

FILE NO:        281559.2020

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Board work / bank stabilization in the Shepherd Street Precinct

 

 

Please address the following:

 

1.    Can an update please be provided on the delivery of the board work/ bank stabilization which formed part of a VPA in the Shepherd Street precinct?

 

A response to these questions will be provided in the 25 November 2020 Council meeting business papers.

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 06

FILE NO:        281575.2020

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Amazon

 

Background

 

Amazon has now been operating in Liverpool for several years.

 

In late 2018, I asked the following questions on notice.

 

Two years on from those questions, Amazon has been one of the few businesses to benefit from the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Hopefully Liverpool, Amazon’s employees and its subcontracted employees are also benefiting.

 

Questions

 

Please address the following:


What percentage of workers based at the Amazon Moorebank fulfilment centre are:

  • from the Liverpool LGA?
  • directly employed by Amazon?
  • employed by a labour hire company?
  • in insecure casual employment?

 

A response to these questions will be provided in the 25 November 2020 Council meeting business papers.

 


 

ITEM NO:       COM 02 – ADDENDUM BOOK

FILE NO:        265271.2020

SUBJECT:     Mimosa Park, 22 Box Road, Casula

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Harle                  Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the outcome of the community consultation;

 

2.    Endorse Option 2 in the report to reclassify, rezone and dispose of Mimosa Park; and

 

3.    Endorse a condition where funds from the sale can be used to upgrade park facilities in that area.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion (moved by Clr Harle) was declared LOST.

 

Division:

Vote for:           Clr Balloot, Clr Hadchiti, Deputy Mayor Hadid, Clr Harle and Clr Rhodes.

Vote against:   Mayor Waller, Clr Ayyad, Clr Hagarty, Clr Kaliyanda, Clr Karnib and Clr Shelton.

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That Council:

 

1.   Receives and notes the outcome of the community consultation; and

                                 

2.    Endorse Option 1 in the report, Mimosa Park to be kept as a local park and embellished and allocate a sum of $15,000 to undertake a feasibility study, environmental testing and concept development.

On being put to the meeting the motion (moved by Clr Hagarty) was declared CARRIED.

 


Presentations by Councillors

Nil.

 

Notices of Motion

 

ITEM NO:       NOM 01

FILE NO:        281448.2020

SUBJECT:     Ban of Fur Sales on Council Land

 

BACKGROUND

 

Numerous reports have highlighted the animal cruelty involved in fur production. Animals are being kept in small cages unable to act out their natural behaviours, after which they are killed in harrowing ways such as electrocution, bludgeoning, or being skinned alive.

Increasing awareness of this cruelty has reduced consumer demand for fur products. However, some producers and vendors are now mislabelling fur products sold in Australia. 

Late last year, forensic tests on faux fur products sold at the Queen Victoria and South Melbourne markets revealed they were made from racoon and racoon dog fur – animals known to be mistreated in fur harvesting facilities in China. Similarly, the trade in exotic animal skins – such as snakes, alligators, crocodiles and other reptiles – is marked by cruelty and significant environmental impacts, with wild animals removed from their native habitat and harvested for skins.

 

Over the last few weeks, the international trade in wildlife for fur, exotic animal skins and other products has been subject to renewed calls for bans due to the coronavirus pandemic, and the risk that this trade will lead to other deadly disease outbreaks in future.

 

Stamping out the trade in fur and exotic animal skins requires action at local, state and federal levels. Therefore, Council can have an important advocacy component to its role. Under the Local Government Act 1993 (NSW), which allows a council to establish policies for the use of its land, Council can also act to prevent the sale of these products on our properties. For example, markets operate under section 68 approvals that permit them to use Council land. It is possible under section 68 approvals to add a condition prohibiting the sale of fur and exotic animal skins in any markets operated on Council-owned land.

Additionally, an amendment to Council’s General Conditions of Hire for Community Facilities that prevents the sale of such products in our venues could reduce markets for these cruel industries, particularly if combined with information to help local residents and business report suspect sales of illegal animal products to the relevant authorities.

The resale of second-hand or vintage fur products can also contribute to demand by perpetuating the idea of ‘fur as fashion’, however, throwing these products out conflicts with our vision of becoming a more sustainable community. 

Again, Council can act by helping raise awareness of alternatives such as donating to Snuggle Coats, a not-for-profit organisation that collects furs for animal groups, carers and wildlife parks across Australia, which in turn use the furs to rehabilitate and comfort animals in their care (i.e. as they recently did with bushfire victims).

 

Given that Liverpool Council has a “no kill” policy, it is entirely reasonable, indeed expected, to keep in line with compassion and respect for animals. Here in NSW, we continue to support this cruel industry by allowing animal fur including that from mink, seals, possums, rabbits and racoons to be imported and sold within our state. This is why Council taking such a stance is so important. 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Kaliyanda)

 

That Council:

 

1.   Reviews its event policies and application forms and guidelines to prohibit the sale of fur products, mislabelled fake fur products, and other exotic animal skins on Council property, including looking at how an exemption for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander vendors that may be impacted could be applied;

 

2.   Writes to the Minister for Home Affairs to call for the introduction of random forensic testing of imported fake fur products, as well as an investigation into prohibition of fur product imports into Australia;

 

3.   Writes to the NSW Minister for Better Regulation and Innovation to request a fur task force be established to assess the size and impact of illegal fur labelling;

 

4.   Promotes through its website and other suitable communications channels:

 

a)   Information to help local residents and businesses report the sale of suspected illegal animal products to the relevant authorities;

 

b)   Ethical and sustainable alternatives to reselling or throwing out old or vintage fur products.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Karnib 

 

That Council:

 

1.   Reviews its event policies and application forms and guidelines to prohibit the sale of fur products, mislabelled fake fur products, and other exotic animal skins on Council property, including looking at how an exemption for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander vendors that may be impacted could be applied;

 

2.   Writes to the Minister for Home Affairs to call for the introduction of random forensic testing of imported fake fur products, as well as an investigation into prohibition of fur product imports into Australia;

 

3.   Writes to the NSW Minister for Better Regulation and Innovation to request a fur task force be established to assess the size and impact of illegal fur labelling;

 

4.   Promotes through its website and other suitable communications channels:

 

a)   Information to help local residents and businesses report the sale of suspected illegal animal products to the relevant authorities; and

 

b)   Ethical and sustainable alternatives to reselling or throwing out old or vintage fur products.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.


ITEM NO:       NOM 02

FILE NO:        281456.2020

SUBJECT:     Liverpool Civic Place

 

BACKGROUND

 

Council’s role is to manage ratepayers funds prudently and in a transparent fashion.

Many members of the community are concerned about the significant risk that council is taking in developing its land at 55 Scott St, also known as Civic Place.

This motion calls on Council to outline the clear financial risk to ratepayers and let them know what their liability is.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Ayyad)

 

That Council:

 

1.   Provide a public report on how much the total debt will be when Civic Place is completed;

 

2.   Provide a public report on how much the total repayments will be on an annual basis and for the life of the loan;

 

3.   Inform the community of how the debt repayments will be funded if there is no tenant for Civic Place or the other vacant space in 33 Moore Street, including the library;

4.   Make public the results from the community consultation that was conducted earlier this year; and

 

5.   Report all the above back to council at the November Council meeting.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                 Seconded: Clr Hadchiti

 

That Council:

 

1.   Provide a public update on the Council’s website on how much the total debt will be when Civic Place is completed;

 

2.   Provide a public update on the Council’s website on how much the total repayments will be on an annual basis and for the life of the loan;

 

3.   Inform the community of how the debt repayments will be funded if there is no tenant for Civic Place or the other vacant space in 33 Moore Street, including the library;

4.   Make public the results from the community consultation that was conducted earlier this year;

5.   Provide Councillors and the community with sufficient information to be adequately informed in-line with the advice from the Office of the Local Government officially dated 13th October 2020; and

 

6.    Provide information about the project on Council’s website by December 2020 and links to the progress of the project.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 


 

 

CONFIDENTIAL ITEMS

ITEM NO:       CONF 01

FILE NO:        244956.2020

SUBJECT:     Order of Liverpool Awards

This item was dealt with later in the meeting in Closed Session pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 1993 because it contains personal matters concerning particular individuals (other than councillors).

 


ITEM NO:       CONF 02

FILE NO:        263224.2020

SUBJECT:     Legal Affairs Report - 1 July 2020 to 30 September 2020

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Harle                  Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council receives and notes the report concerning the legal affairs of Liverpool City Council.

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


ITEM NO:       CONF 03

FILE NO:        269006.2020

SUBJECT:     Project 24

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Harle                  Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.    Withdraw from Project 24 effective from the end of the current Industry Consultation process that Project 24 is undertaking by advising Macarthur Strategic Waste Alliance of its decision as soon as it is practical to do so;

 

2.    Take the findings from the Industry Consultation and utilise it towards the understanding of the market for the future of waste in Liverpool;

 

3.    Commence the development of a new Waste Strategy for Council addressing key opportunities that it can capitalise on based on the changes to the industry;

 

4.    Based on the new waste strategy, develop a plan to undertake the procurement of all the waste processing services that expire in June 2024;

 

5.    Explore opportunities within the Liverpool City Council Local Government Area to develop a strategy around land acquisition for waste facilities or transfer station under risk share and profit share model; and

 

6.    Review the Waste Strategy to take into account the new 20-year Waste Strategy when released by the NSW Government to move the Council’s waste management forward and in line with the NSW Government’s targets.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.


ITEM NO:       CONF 04

FILE NO:        273292.2020

SUBJECT:     Confidential Question With Notice - Management of the operating system for the parking meters

 

Please address the following:

 

Is there anything that restricts Council from seeking expressions of interest or calling for a tender to supply the management of the operating system for the parking meters throughout our LGA?

 

Response:

 

Council has the following two agreements with Duncan Solutions associated with the parking meters:

 

·         Parking Meter contract- This expired on 10 March 2020 and is currently on carryover. This can be terminated with one month’s notice.

  • Park and Pay App agreement- Under the agreement Council is required to provide 90 days notice to terminate.

Given the current contractual arrangements, there is nothing preventing Council going to tender and upon the selection of a proponent, ceasing existing arrangements with the above notice periods.

 

It is noted that Council resolved at the 30 September meeting to “undertake a market assessment to understand what technology is in the market with a view to undertaking a competitive selection process”.

 

On this basis staff are currently undertaking a market assessment which will inform the tender specifications prior to going to tender.

 


Mayor Waller advised that Council would now move into Closed Session to deal with Items CONF 01 – Order of Liverpool Awards, CONF 05 – Woodward Place Master Plan and CONF 06 – Liverpool Animal Shelter pursuant to the provisions of S10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993 as outlined below:

·         CONF 01 – Order of Liverpool Awards is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 1993 because it contains personal matters concerning particular individuals (other than councillors).

 

 

Council moved into Closed Session at 8.46pm.

COUNCIL IN CLOSED SESSION

ITEM NO:       CONF 01

FILE NO:        244956.2020

SUBJECT:     Order of Liverpool Awards

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Hagarty

 

That:

 

  1. Council endorse the awards recipients as recommended by the Civic Advisory Committee at its meeting of 2 September 2020 subject to the amendment made at its meeting of 6 October 2020; and

 

2.    The Civic Advisory Committee Charter be reviewed to ensure the suitability of the nominees and what would exclude them from the Award.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Clrs Shelton, Rhodes and Hadid asked that they be recorded as having voted against the motion.


ITEM NO:       CONF 05

FILE NO:        263698.2020

SUBJECT:     Woodward Place Master Plan

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That Council:

 

1.    Endorse the Woodward Place Master Plan for further agency and community engagements;

 

2.    Approve the commencement of negotiation with CLC, with the intention to acquire or otherwise seek compulsory acquisition of the CLC land, and report back to Council for final approval;

 

3.    Provide sufficient funding for further works as highlighted in the report; and

 

4.    Provide a separate report to Council for the masterplan adoption.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


 

 

TEM NO:        CONF 06 – Confidential Addendum Book

FILE NO:        273423.2020

SUBJECT:     Liverpool Animal Shelter

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes             Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That Council:

 

1.    Endorse Rossmore Grange, Austral (Lot 1016 DP 258344) as the preferred site for the Liverpool Animal Shelter on the basis that it would incur no additional land cost to Council with further detailed studies of the site being required;

 

2.    Direct the Acting Chief Executive Officer to proceed with the process required to amend the plan of management and prepare a planning proposal to amend the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 to permit, with development consent, an “animal boarding or training established” on the site, including an appropriate budget allocation for the necessary studies to support the planning proposal;

 

3.    Note that a further report will be submitted to Council regarding the progress of the planning proposal, including the advice of the Liverpool Local Planning Panel and detailed design/costings;

 

4.    Approve the costs associated with establishing a new Animal Shelter on the site to be funded by proceeds of sales from surplus land (which will be considered by Council at the November 2020 meeting). In the instance Council does not resolve to sell surplus land, then the Animal Shelter be funded via a T-Corp loan; and

 

5.    Approve an extension of the interim arrangements with Rossmore Vet for a further period as outlined in this report.

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for the motion.

 

 

The meeting reopened at 9.33pm.

 

Mayor Waller then read out the resolutions for CONF 01 - Order of Liverpool Awards, CONF 05 - Woodward Place Master Plan and CONF 06 - Liverpool Animal Shelter (as shown above) that were passed in Closed Session.   


 

THE MEETING CLOSED AT 9.35pm.

 

 

<Signature>

Name: Wendy Waller

Title:    Mayor

Date:    25 November 2020

I have authorised a stamp bearing my signature to be affixed to the pages of the Minutes of the Council Meeting held on  27 October 2020. I confirm that Council has adopted these Minutes as a true and accurate record of the meeting.

 

 

 


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 November 2020

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 01

Post Exhibition Report - Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 85) - Rezone land at 146 Newbridge Road, Moorebank from RE2 Private Recreation to R3 Medium Density Residential and amend development standards

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

292809.2020

Report By

Kweku Aikins - Strategic Planner

Approved By

David Smith - Acting Director City Economy and Growth

 

Property

146 Newbridge Road, Moorebank

Lot 70 DP 1254895

Owner

Tanlane Pty Ltd

Applicant

Mirvac Homes (NSW) Pty Ltd

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At its meeting on 29 July 2020, Council resolved (Attachment 1) to support a planning proposal request to rezone land at 146 Newbridge Road, Moorebank from RE2 Private Recreation to R3 Medium Density Residential and to amend development standards.

 

A planning proposal (Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 Draft Amendment 85) (Attachment 2) was prepared and submitted to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) for a Gateway determination in accordance with Council’s resolution. DPIE issued a Gateway determination on 11 September 2020 (Attachment 3), which required Council to:

·    Consult with Sydney Water, the Environment, Energy & Science Group (EES) and NSW Rural Fire Service (RFS) on the proposal for a minimum of 21 days; and

·    Place the proposal on public exhibition for a minimum of 14 days.

 

This report details the post-Gateway actions that have been undertaken, including consultation, and recommends Council finalises the planning proposal and delegates to the A/CEO (or his delegate) authority to liaise with DPIE and the Parliamentary Counsel’s Office to finalise the amendment.

 

Council has been authorised by DPIE to make Amendment 85.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Notes the Gateway determination for Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 85) and the results of public exhibition and community consultation; and

 

2.    Proceeds with Amendment 85 and delegates authority to the A/CEO (or his delegate) to liaise with the NSW Parliamentary Counsel’s Office and the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment to finalise the amendment.

 

 

Report

 

On 23 October 2017, Council received a planning proposal request to amend the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan (LLEP) 2008 for a portion of land at 146 Newbridge Road, Moorebank (Lot 70 DP 1254895).

 

The site is a portion of the land as shown below bounded by the Georges River to the east, Newbridge Road to the north and the Georges Fair residential estate to the west. The site has an area of approximately 4,190m2. Land to the east of the Georges River is located within the Canterbury-Bankstown Local Government Area is characterised as recreational open space.

Map

Description automatically generated        

Figure 1: Aerial view of the site (marked in yellow)

The planning proposal (Amendment 85) proposes changes to the planning controls as listed in Table 1.

 

Table 1: Current and proposed controls for the subject site

Control

Current

Proposed

Zoning (LZN)

RE2 Private Recreation

R3 Medium Density Residential

Maximum height of buildings (HOB)

21m

8.5m

Minimum lot size (LSZ)

10,000m2

300m2 (Area 2)

Floor Space Ration (FSR)

0.25:1

0.65:1

 

At its meeting on 29 July 2020, Council resolved to support the planning proposal request and to submit a planning proposal to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) seeking a Gateway determination.

 

Gateway determination

 

On 11 September 2020, DPIE issued a Gateway determination, which required Council to:

·    Consult with Sydney Water, the Environment Energy & Science Group (EES) and NSW Rural Fire Service (RFS) on the proposal for a minimum of 21 days; and

·    Place the proposal on public exhibition for a minimum of 14 days.

 

Consultation

 

Public Authority Consultation

 

In accordance with the Gateway determination, a copy of the relevant documentation was forwarded to the specified public authorities for comment. A copy of each submission received is included in Attachment 4. No changes are required as a result of public authority consultation.

 

Environment Energy & Science Group (EES)

 

The EES Group within DPIE made a detailed submission that raised a number of issues. Table 2 below provides a summary of these issues and the officer’s response.

 

Table 2: EES submission issues and officer responses

Issues raised

Officer’s Response

There are unlikely to be any ecological impacts as a result of the planning proposal.

Noted.

Floodplain risk management issues including emergency management considerations for the Moorebank East Precinct have been previously raised by EES and the NSW State Emergency Service (SES). The issues raised are still relevant to this planning proposal.

The Council Meeting Report, the Planning Proposal Report, and the Gateway Determination appear to have overlooked flooding or any associated constraints. Liverpool Council has a legal responsibility and a duty of care to address the concerns raised by EES and SES (both lead agencies for flooding in NSW) in previous correspondence.

 

Previous comments from the SES and EES have been applied to the planning of the wider Moorebank East Precinct. Council engaged an independent flood expert (Molino Stewart) to assess flood evacuation for the entire precinct.

At a meeting held on 22 November 2019, Council flood engineers, Molino Stewart and Tooker + Associates (specialist representative on behalf the proponent), agreed on an elevated pedestrian bridge that would provide an acceptable pedestrian evacuation route from the subject site.

The bridge has been approved as part of DA-24/2017 (issued on 24 June 2020) for the subdivision of the broader development site into three land parcels.

Additionally, the proposal has been assessed by Council officers and the Department of Planning, Industry & Environment who found that consistency with Ministerial Direction 4.3 (Flood Prone Land) had been justified. Accordingly, it is considered that Council has exercised its duty of care as a floodplain manager for the subject site in relation to Amendment 85.

The flood assessment prepared by Cardno dated 13 April 2018 should be revised to address the issues raised by the EES and SES.

The flood assessment should consider the likely adverse impacts from increased rainfall and sea level rise due to climate change. For overland flooding, the assessment can consider a 10%, 20% and 30% rainfall increase, while the 0.5% and 0.2% AEP events can be adopted as a proxy. The 0.5m freeboard should not be eroded to account for climate change impacts.

 

Note: The 1991 Georges River Flood Study has been superseded by the 2018 Georges River Flood Study prepared by BMT for Liverpool and Canterbury-Bankstown Councils.

 

The submitted flood assessment has been assessed by Council’s flood engineers who found that the proposed rezoning will not cause a net loss of flood storage below the 1% AEP flood. Cardno’s assessment of flood impacts was consistent with the consent issued for the subdivision of the broader site with regards to the proposed filling of the site above flood planning level.

Consideration of climate change impacts including potential changes to the assessment of overland flooding and the 0.5m freeboard are to be addressed in detail as part of the development application (DA) process.

 

Assertions that the 1991 flood study has been superseded by the 2018 study are incorrect. The Georges River Floodplain Risk Management Study & Plan 2004 is the latest relevant study which has been endorsed by Council. The 2018 study is for flood impact assessment of major projects only. Council continues to use the flood levels as identified in the 2004 plan.

The assumptions on flood evacuation in the Cardno report have not considered the nature of a flood event as there is no consideration of the ‘Timeline Evacuation Planning’ which shows the timeline of emergency to response for flood evacuation and associated uncertainties.

 

The assumptions in the Cardno report are supported by the findings of the Tooker + Associates Flood Emergency Response Plan (FERP) dated 27 February 2020.

The FERP found that Molino Stewart had already provided details of the NSW SES recommended flood evacuation timing assessment for the Georges River catchment area.

Ordinarily, the SES will issue a flood evacuation order 13 hours before a severe flood event with levels expected higher than RL 4m AHD (the 100yr ARI flood level for the site is RL 5.6m AHD).

The SES method assumes a vehicle evacuation rate of 600 vehicles per lane and assumes a rate for pedestrian evacuation of 2 km/hour. Molino Stewart indicates that there is ample time to evacuate the pedestrians for the adopted evacuation distance of 1km (30 minutes to walk this distance).

The pedestrian bridge landing in Paine Park will be at a ground level of RL 7m AHD. This level would be equivalent to a 2000yr ARI flood level. The estimated time taken for the PMF flood level to rise from RL 6.1m AHD to RL 7m AHD would be approximately 1 hour. The distance from the eastern side of the development to the pedestrian bridge and then up Horizon Circuit to the PMF level is approximately 580m. Walking at a relatively slow rate of 2km/hr, as recommended by SES, Molino Stewart agreed that people could evacuate on foot within approximately 10 to 20 minutes which is readily within the available time of 60 minutes. Accordingly, people will be able evacuate without having to walk through ponding flood waters.

EES does not support private emergency management plans. The roles and responsibilities for coordinating flood emergency management rests with the SES as the State’s combat agency. There is no clarity about the role and power of the building manager and flood warden at the site and how they will interact and communicate with the established emergency management arrangements in NSW.

 

It is advised that the subject proposal will facilitate a zone boundary adjustment for 9 dwellings only and that a private emergency management plan is not required or proposed. At a meeting held on 22 November 2019, Council flood engineers, Molino Stewart and Tooker + Associates (specialist representative on behalf the proponent), agreed on an elevated pedestrian bridge that would provide an acceptable pedestrian evacuation route from the subject site. The bridge has been approved as part of DA-24/2017 (issued on 24 June 2020) for the subdivision of the broader development site into three land parcels.

As discussed above, there is ample time to evacuate in accordance with the SES flood evacuation order 13 hours before a severe flooding event.

Properties affected by the Moorebank Voluntary Acquisition Scheme (MVAS) are only 500m to the north of the subject development site. However, while flood risk is being eliminated through the MVAS, intensified development is being sought in the Moorebank East precinct. Therefore, there appears to be an inconsistent approach between the two areas.

Properties in the MVAS are in fragmented ownership. The ownership pattern creates a barrier to negotiating an equitable outcome with regards to filling the land above the flood planning level with associated earthworks to compensate for flood storage lost.

The Moorebank East precinct is split between 3 owners. The low number of owners provides certainty that large, consolidated land parcels can be filled above the flood planning level with appropriate compensatory flood storage on-site.

 

Rural Fire Service

 

The RFS provided a submission that future development applications should include a detailed bush fire assessment that addresses the requirements of ‘Section 8.2.1 - Increased Residential Densities’ of Planning for Bush Fire Protection 2019. It is noted that the RFS raised no concerns in relation to bush fire, subject to the general terms of approval (GTA) dated 15 December 2017 for the Integrated Development referral by Liverpool City Council under reference DA-24/2017.

 

Sydney Water

 

Despite numerous requests, no formal response was provided from Sydney Water. Given the scale and nature of the proposed amendment, it is deemed that this aspect of the amendment is resolved.

 

Community Consultation

 

In accordance with the Gateway determination, the planning proposal and relevant documents were placed on public exhibition from 1 October to 16 October 2020. No submissions were received from the community. Accordingly, no changes have been made to the planning proposal.

 

Conclusion

 

The Gateway determination requirements, including public authority consultation and public exhibition for Amendment 85 have been satisfied. No objections were received from members of the community and no changes have been made to the draft amendment.

 

Council has been authorised by DPIE to make Amendment 85 and this report recommends that Council proceeds with Amendment 85 and delegates authority to the A/CEO (or his delegate) to liaise with the NSW Parliamentary Counsel’s Office and the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment to finalise the amendment.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Enhance the environmental performance of buildings and homes.

Environment

Enhance the environmental performance of buildings and homes.


Social

Regulate for a mix of housing types that responds to different population groups such as young families and older people.


Civic Leadership

Undertake communication practices with the community and stakeholders across a range of media.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision-making processes.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 

Risk

The risk is considered Low

The risk is considered within Council’s risk appetite.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Council Resolution - 29 July 2020 (Under separate cover)

2.         Planning Proposal (Under separate cover)

3.         Gateway determination (Under separate cover)

4.         Public Authority Responses (Under separate cover)  


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 November 2020

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 02

Post exhibition report - Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 69) and Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 (Amendment 36) - Signage in the B3 and B4 zones

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

292810.2020

Report By

Luke Oste - Executive Planner

Approved By

David Smith - Acting Director City Economy and Growth

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council resolved at its meeting on 27 April 2016 to pursue an amendment to the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (LEP) (Amendment 69), to permit signage with consent in the B3 Commercial Core and B4 Mixed Use zones (Attachment 1). A planning proposal was subsequently prepared (Attachment 2) and a Gateway determination issued on 23 January 2018 (Attachment 3).

 

On 28 August 2019, Council considered a report recommending that Amendment 69 not proceed following a review of the need and appropriateness for third party advertising signage within the Liverpool City Centre (Attachment 4).

 

Council subsequently resolved:

 

1.       That Council defer a decision until the public domain master plan is submitted to Council and community consultation is undertaken; and

 

2.       Publicly exhibit draft Amendment 69 and the draft DCP amendment concurrently to seek feedback.

 

Amendment 36 to the Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 (DCP) was then prepared and reported to Council at the 29 April 2020 meeting where Council provided in principle support for exhibition.

 

Public authority and community consultation have been completed for Amendment 69 to the LEP and Amendment 36 to the LDCP. No objections were received for either amendment. A submission was received from Transport for NSW (Attachment 5) and another from the Outdoor Media Association (Attachment 6). Minor amendments have been made to Amendment 36 to the DCP in response to these submissions. This is included in the post-exhibition version of the DCP (Amendment 7).

 

The post-exhibition version of Amendment 36 to the DCP provides clear guidance for third party advertising as permitted under LEP Amendment 69. These objectives and controls will avoid a proliferation of third party signage within the Liverpool City Centre as it develops into Sydney’s third CBD.

 

This report details the post-Gateway actions that have been undertaken, including consultation, and recommends that Council finalises the planning proposal and delegates to the A/CEO (or his delegate) authority to liaise with the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment and the Parliamentary Counsel’s Office to finalise the Amendment. Further, it is recommended that Council adopts Amendment 36 to the DCP in support of Amendment 69 to the LEP.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.     Notes the Gateway determination for Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 69) and the results of the public authority consultation and community consultation;

 

2.     Proceeds with Amendment 69 to the LEP and delegates authority to the A/CEO (or his delegate) to liaise with the Department of Planning, Industry, and Environment and the Parliamentary Counsel’s Office to finalise the amendment;

 

3.     Adopts Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 (Amendment 36); and

 

4.     Notifies submitters of Council’s decision.

 

 

REPORT

 

Background

 

The Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (LEP) controls applying to signage were reviewed by Council in response to a review of assets and representations received to permit third party advertising signage within the Local Government Area (LGA). Following this analysis, Council resolved at its meeting on 27 April 2016 to pursue an amendment to the LEP to permit signage with consent in the B3 Commercial Core and B4 Mixed Use zones (Attachment 1).

A planning proposal was prepared (Amendment 69) and subsequently submitted to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) for Gateway determination on 20 November 2017 (Attachment 2).

 

A Gateway determination was issued on 23 January 2018 and numerous Gateway alterations were provided in order to extend the timeframes for completion of the LEP amendment (Attachment 3).

 

The final timeframe for completion of this amendment is 23 January 2021.

 

On 28 August 2019, Council considered a report recommending that Amendment 69 not proceed following a review of the need and appropriateness for third party advertising signage within the Liverpool City Centre (Attachment 4).

 

Council resolved that:

 

1.    Council defer a decision until the public domain master plan is submitted to Council and community consultation is undertaken; and

 

2.    Publicly exhibit draft Amendment 69 and the draft DCP amendment concurrently to seek feedback.

A draft amendment to the DCP (Amendment 36) was prepared and reported to Council at its 29 April 2020 meeting. Given the opportunity afforded by this DCP amendment process, a full review of the outdoor advertising and signage provisions of the DCP was undertaken to improve clarity, rectify errors, and reduce complexity.

 

At this meeting Council resolved to:

 

1.    Place the draft amendment to the Liverpool Development Control Plan 2008 – Part 1 General Controls (Outdoor Advertising and Signage) on public exhibition for a minimum period of 28 days in accordance with Clause 18 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

 

2.    Delegates to the CEO the finalisation of the DCP amendment should no submissions in opposition be received; or receive a further report outlining details of the submissions in opposition received at the conclusion of the exhibition period.

 

Accordingly, LEP Amendment 69 and DCP Amendment 36 were placed on public exhibition and public authority consultation was undertaken.

 

Public Authority Consultation

 

In accordance with the Gateway determination, public authority consultation was required with the Roads and Maritime Services (now Transport for New South Wales) and the Liverpool Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

 

A formal response from Transport for New South Wales (TfNSW) was received on 24 July 2020 (Attachment 5). No objection was raised in relation to LEP Amendment 69. Detailed comments were provided in relation to DCP Amendment 36. A summary of the issues raised within the TfNSW submission and the corresponding Council staff responses are provided in Table 1 below. DCP Amendment 36 has been revised to incorporate responses to the submission (Attachment 7).

 

Table 1 – TfNSW Submission Issues and Council Staff Responses

Issue Raised

Council Staff Response

Signage must not include flashing lights, animations, methods of elimination or other characteristics that may confuse, distract or dazzle drivers.

The draft DCP has been updated to address this issue, specifically through a new Control 7 within Part 26.1 General Controls. Dynamic Digital Signage is now not supported to ensure this issue is addressed.

Signage along transport corridors must comply with SEPP 64 Transport Corridor Outdoor Advertising and Signage Guidelines.

The draft DCP has been updated to address this issue, specifically through a new Control 10 within Part 26.1 General Controls.

Signage must not impede a driver’s view of critical road infrastructure, directional signs, traffic signals or other information about road alignment.

The draft DCP has been updated to address this issue, specifically through a new Control 8 and 9 within Part 26.1 General Controls.

Clarify “dwell times” for Static Digital Signs visible from roads with a traffic speed of less than 80 km/h

Draft DCP text updated to address this issue, specifically through a revised Control 6.a under Static Digital Signs within Part 26.2 Signage Controls by Type.

 

The Liverpool Chamber of Commerce and Industry was contacted on numerous occasions and no submission or points of concerns were provided. It is deemed that this referral requirement is satisfied.

 

Community Consultation

 

Amendment 69 to the LEP and Amendment 36 to the DCP were placed on public exhibition during which a single submission was received from the Outdoor Media Association (OMA) (Attachment 6). A summary of the issues raised within the OMA submission and the corresponding Council staff responses are provided in Table 2 below. DCP Amendment 36 has been revised to incorporate Council staff responses (Attachment 7).

 

 

Table 2 – OMA Submission Issues and Council Staff Responses

Issue Raised

Council Staff Response

Restore the terms ‘building identification signs’ and ‘business identification signs’ to Section 26 of Part 1 of LDCP 2008, to help clarify controls applying to advertising signage.

Draft DCP text updated to address this issue, specifically by reintroducing the terms ‘building identification signs’ and ‘business identification signs’ to the “Applies to” subsection of Section 26 of Part 1 LDCP 2008.

It’s unclear in Part 26.5 Third Party Advertising what Control 1.a refers to. This control could be interpreted to mean that only one sign would be allowed, regardless of what type of sign it is.

Draft DCP text updated to address this issue, specifically through a revised Control 1.a in Part 26.5 Third Party Advertising that specifies that the control is to limit numerous signs for the purpose of third-party advertising signage.

The restriction on signage size contained in Clause 26.5 (1) (b) is too small to be widely commercially viable as per industry standard billboard sizes.

Draft DCP text updated to address this issue, specifically by amending Control 1.b) within Part 26.5 Third Party Advertising. This control has been amended to provide greater flexibility and allow for signage up to 50sqm in area. The same has been applied to Control 7 within Part 26.3 Signage Controls in Zones under the “Business Zones” subsection.

Reconsider Control 26.5 (5) which discourages third-party advertising on stand-alone structures.

Liberalising restrictions on advertising on stand-alone structures is not supported. The object of the amendment is to provide additional income to existing businesses in the city centre (by way of leasing space for signage on existing business premises).

Stand-alone advertising structures may tend to substitute for existing businesses, rather than advertising signage being developed as an ancillary use.

It’s unclear what the term “signage allowance” referenced in Control 26.5 (2) refers to.

Draft DCP text updated to address this issue, specifically by amending Control 2 within Part 26.5 to clarify that signage allowance applies to the overall signage size and locational limitations described in Section 26.2.

 

 

Liverpool City Centre Public Domain Masterplan

 

The Liverpool City Centre Public Domain Masterplan (LCC PDMP) is a 10-year vision to guide the development of the public realm within the city centre with an aim to improve the quality of the public domain. The LCC PDMP was adopted by Council at its meeting on 24 June 2020.

 

A report considered by Council at the 28 August 2019 meeting (Attachment 4), outlined a concern that a proliferation of third-party signage could have negative impacts on the city centre, detracting from the amenity of the city and that this would be inconsistent with the objectives of the LCC PDMP.

 

The post-exhibition version of Amendment 36 to the DCP offers clear guidance for third party advertising as permitted under LEP Amendment 69. These objectives and controls will help to avoid a proliferation of third-party signage within the Liverpool City Centre as it develops into Sydney’s third CBD.

 

Conclusion

 

The Gateway requirements, including consultation for Amendment 69 to the LEP have been satisfied. This report recommends that Council proceeds with Amendment 69 to the LEP and liaises with the Parliamentary Counsel’s Office and DPIE for the amendment to be gazetted.

 

Additionally, it is recommended that Council adopts Amendment 36 to the DCP, as amended in response to the submissions received.

 

CONSIDERATIONS 

Economic

Further develop a commercial centre that accommodates a variety of employment opportunities.

Facilitate economic development.

Facilitate the development of new tourism based on local attractions, culture and creative industries.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Provide cultural centres and activities for the enjoyment of the arts.

Preserve and maintain heritage, both landscape and cultural as urban development takes place.


Civic Leadership

Undertake communication practices with the community and stakeholders across a range of media.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision-making processes.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Risk

The risk is considered to be Low

The risk is considered within Council’s risk appetite.

  ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Council Resolution and Report - April 2016 (Under separate cover)

2.         Planning Proposal Amendment 69 (Under separate cover)

3.         Gateway determination (Under separate cover)

4.         Council Resolution and Report - August 2019 (Under separate cover)

5.         TfNSW Submission (Under separate cover)

6.         Outdoor Media Association Submission (Under separate cover)

7.         Post-Exhibition Draft LDCP 2008 (Amendment 36) (Under separate cover)  


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 November 2020

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 03

Street Naming Request - Austral

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Advocate for, and develop, transport networks to create an accessible city

File Ref

296553.2020

Report By

Christopher Jattan - Administration Officer - Planning & Transport Strategy

Approved By

David Smith - Acting Director City Economy and Growth

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report seeks a Council resolution on a street renaming request to rename a future north-south road, located between Bantam Street and Twelfth Avenue, Austral from Gournay Street to Beuk Street.  

 

The proposed name has been assessed using Council’s Naming Convention Policy and have been granted pre-approval by the NSW Geographical Names Board (GNB).

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Supports the renaming of Gournay Street to Beuk Street, Austral;

 

2.    Forwards the name to the Geographical Names Board, seeking formal approval;

 

3.    Publicly exhibit the name in accordance with Council’s Naming Convention Policy, for a period of 28 days, following formal approval from the GNB; and

 

4.    Authorises the Acting Chief Executive Officer to undertake the process of gazettal, if there are no submissions received during public exhibition.

 

 


 

REPORT

 

One street naming proposal was received during August 2020 to rename a future north-south road, located between Bantam Street and Twelfth Avenue, Austral from Gournay Street to Beuk Street.  

 

The proposed street name has been assessed using Council’s Naming Convention Policy and the Geographical Names Board has granted pre-approval.

 

Beuk Street is consistent with the Austral street naming theme and has been checked for duplication using the Geographical Names Board’s Online Road Naming System.

 

Beuk Street, Austral

 

This future street has already been named as Gournay Street as shown in Figure 1. Council approved this name, along with most other future streets in Austral in 2018. These names have subsequently been gazetted by the Geographical Names Board of NSW.

 

This street has not yet been constructed and will run through the applicant’s property (Figure 2). The applicant has requested that the street be renamed as Beuk Avenue in memory of his late father. The applicant has provided information about his late father, to support the application (Confidential Attachment 1).

 

                 

Figure 1 – Current assigned name                                Figure 2  – Proposed renaming to Beuk Street

 

Next Steps

 

If supported by Council, the above naming request will be placed on public exhibition for 28 days on Council’s website. If no objections are received, the naming request will be forwarded to the Geographical Names Board for formal approval and gazettal.

 

Council officers will consider all submissions during the public notification period. The following three potential scenarios are likely to arise:

 

·   No objections received - The naming request will be forwarded to the Geographical Names Board for formal approval and gazettal to the NSW Parliamentary Counsel’s Office (PCO) under the delegation of the Acting Chief Executive Officer (or delegate).

 

Relevant stakeholders including the following will be notified to update their mapping systems - Australia Post, NSW Ambulance, Fire and Rescue NSW, NSW Rural Fire Service, NSW State Emergency Service, NSW Volunteer Rescue Association, Transport for NSW and NSW Police Force.

 

·   Objections from the relevant agencies - Council will not proceed with the naming request. The applicant will be notified of the outcome. A report to Council will be prepared for the next available meeting outlining the reason for rejection.

 

·   Submissions received from the community - If there is a strong community objection, or reason to reconsider the proposed name, a report will be prepared for the next available Council meeting recommending withdrawal of the naming request.

 

If Council decides to support the proposal, the naming request will proceed to the PCO for gazettal under the delegation of the Acting Chief Executive Officer (or delegate). If Council decides not to adopt the naming request, the applicant will be notified in writing outlining the reason for rejection.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Preserve and maintain heritage, both landscape and cultural as urban development takes place.


Civic Leadership

Foster neighbourhood pride and a sense of responsibility.

Legislative

Roads Act 1993.

Risk

The risk is considered to be Low.

The risk is considered within Council’s risk appetite.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Street Naming Application Form - Confidential


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 November 2020

City Economy and Growth Report

 

EGROW 04

Liverpool Health and Innovation Trade Delegation to New Zealand 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Attract businesses for economic growth and employment opportunities

File Ref

299268.2020

Report By

Brei Montgomery - International Engagement and Trade Advisor

Approved By

David Smith - Acting Director City Economy and Growth

 

 

Executive Summary

 

At its meeting held on 29 May 2019, Council resolved to adopt the International Trade Engagement Strategy.

 

The strategy identified New Zealand (NZ) as number one for ease of doing business and a primary focus area for the Council to develop activities to accelerate trade success for the business community. The strategy recommended targeting the medical and education sectors, including cross-border collaboration and inviting leading researchers for exchanges and tours with the Liverpool Innovation Precinct (LIP).

 

On 1 May 2019, the Mayor, CEO, and senior Council managers hosted a business lunch with the NZ Consul General where there were discussions around a potential trade and civic delegation traveling to Auckland for business opportunities coinciding with their annual Pasifika Festival.

 

At the 25 September 2019 Council meeting, Council resolved that the CEO should facilitate arrangements for a trade and civic delegation to Auckland, New Zealand in March 2020.

 

The COVID-19 health pandemic changed the plans for the Health and Innovation Trade Delegation to New Zealand in March 2020. It resulted in only a small number of businesses completing parts of the mission. However, business to business relationships have been established over the last seven months. Some of these successes include Trans-Tasman partnerships in medical technology and food innovation, and an upcoming event between the Auckland Business Chamber and Western Sydney Business Chamber.


 

 

A second trip inclusive of Council’s civic delegation would:

·    Mature Council’s relationship with Auckland Council and Austrade in New Zealand;

·    Provide learnings from Auckland’s urban placemaking and innovation precinct success;

·    Solidify the recent Trans-Tasman MoU agreements with face to face meetings;

·    Provide the opportunity to officially invite New Zealand’s senior administrative leaders to tour and view the Liverpool Innovation (LIP) and Aerotropolis Precinct concepts. This would assist to build on the Trans-Tasman collaborations developing across health and medical technology, food innovation, and education sectors.

 

This report recommends a part two continuation of the original civic and business delegation, which will align with the Liverpool Innovation Precinct priorities. Council will partner with the Western Sydney Business Chamber to facilitate arrangements for the delegation to visit New Zealand in March 2021 and with an anticipated budget of a maximum of $20,000. These trade delegation plans are based on the premise that Australia and New Zealand’s international borders will be open by March 2021.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Approves the Trade and Civic delegation to Auckland, New Zealand in March 2021, (or as soon as practicable following the easing of Covid restrictions) and notes the A/CEO will facilitate the necessary arrangements;

 

2.    Determine which Councillors will attend as members of the delegation;

 

3.    Endorse expenditure for this delegation of up to $20,000 from the City Economy budget; and

 

4.    Receive a future report on the outcomes of the visit.

 

 

REPORT

 

Background

 

At its meeting held on 29 May 2019, Council resolved to adopt the International Trade Engagement Strategy.

 

The strategy is underpinned by the quadruple bottom line approach of Liverpool’s Community Strategic Plan, particularly Direction 3: Generating Opportunity. The strategy will assist the Council in meeting its commitment to:

·    attract businesses for economic growth and employment opportunities; and

·    create an attractive environment for investment.

 

The strategy identified New Zealand (NZ) as number one for ease of doing business and a primary focus area for Council to develop activities to accelerate trade success for the business community.

 

The strategy recommended several sectors that should be immediate areas of focus for the Council, including aerospace and defense, medicine, and education. It highlighted the opportunity of “an open environment of medical innovation across the Tasman.”

 

The strategy recommended that Council:

·      Invite leading researchers for staff exchanges at Liverpool Hospital and Liverpool Innovation Precinct tours. This would assist the integration of the Trans-Tasman collaborations developing across health and medical technology, food innovation and education sectors;

·      Encourage cross-border collaboration on data gathering and research into shared problems. An example of this is the University of Auckland (NZ), Callaghan Innovation (NZ), Western Sydney University, Liverpool Hospital and Ingham Institute of Research who recently collaborated on a grant submission for the Australian COVID-19 Research Grants Program. The submission focus was for a non-contact patient care solution;

·      Build relationships/programs with leading NZ universities in growth fields (i.e. medical, engineering);

·      Lobby for increasing mutual recognition of TAFE NSW qualifications; and

·      Invite senior administrative members of major NZ cities to tour the Liverpool Innovation Precinct, to promote the region as a landing pad for NZ start-ups and accelerators to commercialise into Australia.

 

On 1 May 2019, the Mayor, CEO and senior Council managers hosted a business lunch with the NZ Consul General, Bill Dobie and NZ Commercial Business Advisor, Anna Booth, to share information about respective portfolios and identify opportunities for trade and export between Liverpool, Auckland, and other NZ precincts. 

 

An overview was provided about Council’s International Trade Engagement Strategy and discussion was held about a potential trade and civic delegation to be led by the Mayor with Councillors and local businesses traveling to Auckland for business opportunities.

 

 

Program Overview

 

A proposed part two draft itinerary* would involve:

Fri 12 March 2021

The delegation flying from Sydney to Auckland

 

Sat 13 - Tues 16 March 2021

A civic program with the Mayor and Councillors. Opportunity to meet with Auckland Council to discuss their urban design and innovation strategy, visit Manukau Institute of Technology whose mission is to help the local community obtain great jobs, and travel to Hobsonville, a master planned community where people like to live, work and play.

 

A business matching program to be facilitated by Austrade.

 

Wed 17 March 2021

Delegation to depart Auckland

 

*The program is subject to Auckland Council and Austrade reviewing the local events calendar and suggesting the most appropriate dates to travel.

 

Proposed Delegation

 

Successful trade missions are typically sector focused. Based on recommendations in the strategy, it is suggested that the trade delegation be tailored to the health and education sector in relation to the Liverpool Innovation Precinct (LIP). The trade delegation will provide opportunities for LIP members to showcase their business capabilities, promote their research and connect them with New Zealand markets, buyers, researchers and business leaders.

 

It is proposed that this delegation would include the following attendees:

 

Council Representatives:

 

·    Mayor

·    2 Councillors

·    CEO (or delegate)

·    Senior Council Officer and/or Manager LIP

 

Other Councillors and Council support staff may be identified to join this delegation as needed.

 

Liverpool Innovation Precinct Members

 

Liverpool Innovation Precinct members and their representatives will be invited to participate in the delegation on the basis that they fund their own travel and accommodation expenses.

 

·    David Borger, Executive Director, Western Sydney Business Chamber

·    Darryl Harkness, Chief Executive Officer, Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research

·    Amanda Larkin, Chief Executive Officer, South Western Sydney Local Health District

·    Josephine Chow, Director of Strategic Projects, South Western Sydney Local Health District

·    Representatives from Western Sydney University, University of Wollongong, University of New South Wales and TAFE NSW.

Business Matching

 

The following institutions have been identified for potential business matching and knowledge sharing:

 

Auckland Council

 

Auckland is New Zealand’s leading economic region, generating more than a third of the country’s GDP. Auckland is an economic hub of the Asia Pacific region and one of the world’s most business-friendly markets. More than 100 multinational corporations call Auckland their Asia-Pacific home.

 

Auckland’s technology and knowledge-intensive industries employ thousands of STEM workers, undertaking high levels of research and development powering their economic growth. Auckland’s tech sector comprises ICT and software companies across fields including cyber security, big data and fin-tech, and high-tech manufacturing such as medical devices and aerospace engineering.

 

Key Initiatives in Auckland:

 

·    GRIDAKL is part of the innovation precinct in Auckland’s Wynyard Quarter, designed to maximise innovation by harnessing the power of collaboration. Creating pathways for innovative individuals, entrepreneurs and businesses to connect, share ideas and access the tools they need to help them grow. GridAKL’s role is to assist high-impact, growth-oriented, technology-focused businesses and entrepreneurs to develop and commercialise their innovations.

 

·    The Southern Initiative (TSI) plans and delivers a long-term programme of co-ordinated investment and actions to bring about transformational social, economic and physical change in Auckland. Areas of focus include social innovation, entrepreneurship and sustainable procurement practices.

 

 

·    Auckland Co-Design Lab is funded by Auckland Council and sponsored by eight central government departments. The Lab was established to provide a neutral space to explore the use of co-design and other innovative approaches to address complex social issues. A key focus is for multi-agency teams to collaborate, work alongside citizens and to support and broker innovative ideas and solutions.

 

The University of Auckland

 

The University of Auckland is NZ’s largest university with over 40,000 students.

 

·    Uniservices partners with the best minds at the University of Auckland to apply intelligent thinking to ideas that have the potential to change the world. They pull together three key ingredients for innovation success – IP identification and protection, market knowledge and connectivity – with best practice proof of concept and pre-seed investment management to transfer IP to the private sector as fast and efficiently as possible.

 

·    Through the University of Auckland Inventors Fund, Uniservices has been providing early proof of concept and pre-seed investment to support the University’s research discoveries, enabling them to reach a point where commercial usefulness can be demonstrated and the first steps are taken to ensure commercial viability.

 

·    The Newmarket Innovation Precinct (NIP) connects industry professionals with the University’s research and technical experts. The R&D community collaborates on high-risk challenges with the potential to create new technologies.

 

·    The National Institute for Health Innovation (NIHI) are experts in providing researchers with complex project management, IT, data management and analytics support, delivery of commercial health projects and commercialisation/deployment of health initiatives.

 

·    The Centre for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CAMRI) is the first MRI venture in New Zealand to focus on high-end research work as well as routine clinical imaging.

 

·    Auckland Medical Research Foundation had a lead role in the establishment of a Medical School in the University of Auckland with successful research in stroke, dementia, skin cancer, and tendons.

 

·    New Zealand’s Medtech Centre of Research Excellence is the single point of contact for NZ’s capability and resources in Medtech. It is a national industry research network led by a partnership between Auckland University of Technology, Callaghan Innovation, Universities of Auckland, Canterbury and Otago and Victoria University of Wellington.

 

Manukau Institute of Technology

 

As Liverpool is to City of Sydney, Manukau is a satellite town to Auckland. The purpose of the Manukau Institute of Technology is to get people into great jobs. Their mission is to deliver vocationally focused tertiary education, research and technology transfer that ensures Auckland’s economy, graduates, employers and communities have the capability and skills to achieve their potential.

 

Medical Technology Association of New Zealand

 

The leading industry body representing medical technology manufacturers, importers and distributors of medical devices in New Zealand.

 

Fisher & Paykel Healthcare

 

Respiratory and sleep apnea devices. Based in East Tamaki, Auckland.

 

In addition to these institutions and initiatives, a full business program will be developed and coordinated by Austrade. This will support LIP & WSBC members to conduct business, export, and investment activities for potential trade opportunities.

 

Resources

 

An estimated cost for this delegation is up to $20,000, which includes travel costs, accommodation, transport, food, gifts and other incidental expenses. Whilst there were some budget savings from the March 2020 visit, it is still anticipated that additional expenditure will be required to deliver the 2021 Mission. This expenditure will be sought through the normal Council budgetary processes.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Further develop a commercial centre that accommodates a variety of employment opportunities.

Encourage and promote businesses to develop in the hospital health and medical precinct (of the City Centre).

Facilitate economic development.

Budget estimate of up to $20,000 does not include an Austrade business matching service fee or associated costs to host an event in market.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Facilitate the development of community leaders.

Legislative

The trade delegation plans are based on the premise that Australia and New Zealand’s international borders will be open by March 2021.

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting 25 November 2020

City Community and Culture Report

 

COM 01

Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Implement access and equity for all members of the community

File Ref

270327.2020

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Tina Sangiuliano - Acting Director City Community and Culture

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council is committed to building strong and resilient communities in the Liverpool Local Government Area (LGA) and to maximising social wellbeing. Council helps achieve these goals by providing financial support through grants and sponsorships to develop leadership skills, increase participation in community activities and address identified social issues.

 

Impacts from COVID-19 and respective social distancing requirements continue to limit the capacity and eligibility of programs, projects, or events. To ascertain community safety, demonstrate compliance with NSW Health guidelines, and demonstrate evidence of proactive and measurable program governance, all applicants have been requested to provide a COVID-19 safety plan.

 

This report provides funding recommendations totalling $15,850 under the Sustainable Environment Grants Program. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council endorses the recommendation of $15,850 (GST exclusive) under the Sustainable Environment Grants Program for the following project:

 

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Holy Spirit Catholic Primary School Carnes Hill

Holy Spirit Catholic Primary School Carnes Hill Sustainable Garden

$3,000

Ashcroft Public School

Vege Garden Project

$5,000

Wattle Grove Public School P&C

School Garden

$4,700

Liverpool Women's Health Centre

Darug Plants for Darug Land

$3,150

REPORT

 

Sustainable Environment Grants

 

The Sustainable Environment Grants Program received 4 applications which met the eligibility criteria and are recommended for funding as follows:

 

Applicant 

Holy Spirit Catholic Primary School Carnes Hill

Project 

Holy Spirit Catholic Primary School Carnes Hill Sustainable Garden

Amount Requested

$3,000

Total Project Cost

$3,000

Description 

Objectives:

 

The aim of the project is to repurpose the existing garden spaces into an authentic learning space and develop responsible sustainable environment practices that are beneficial to students and staff. The project will include:

·     Revitalising existing garden space consisting of four garden beds and establish an additional two garden beds;

·     Creating an area to engage students in waste reduction and sustainable composting;

·     Improving the current use of water in the area by installing rainwater tanks and water saving hoses;

·     Dedicating a portion of garden space to develop a native environment with native plants; and

·     Provide storage solutions for the equipment students will need to use to access the garden.

 

The project will enable students and staff the opportunity to learn and connect with the idea of sustainability, have ownership, and take charge of maintaining their local environment.

 

Outcomes:

 

·     Establish a revitalised garden space with six garden beds, a small native garden to attract native species, a dedicated compost and waste reduction system, and an area to grow plants from seed and propagate from existing plants; 

·     Enable harvesting and selling of produce as part of a market garden to reinvest back into purchasing new plants and seeds;

·     Create solutions for the school’s goal of diminishing a contribution to landfill; and

·     Generate an opportunity for students and staff to engage in sustainable practices and take ownership of garden spaces.

COVID-19 Safety Plan

Only teaching staff allowed on the school site are permitted to work on this project. All staff will maintain appropriate COVID-19 social distancing guidelines whilst working in small groups, as well as undertaking the mandatory recommendations made by NSW Health in regard to schools and educational settings. Students will work on the project in small groups and in segregated grade groups as per the instructions of NSW Health.

Beneficiaries 

·     Students and teaching staff of Holy Spirit Catholic Primary School Carnes Hill; and

·     Parents and carers of students.

Assessment 

Recommended for Funding - $3,000

 

The applicant’s project aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 2 Strengthening and Protecting Our Environment and meets the Sustainable Environment Grants Program’s funding outcomes. The project will create a revitalised garden space for the school to share, inform, and connect on sustainable practices and lead to significant real-world learning experiences for students and staff.

 

 

Expected program outcomes 7.5.1 - a), d), and e). 

 

Applicant 

Ashcroft Public School

Project 

 Vege Garden Project

Amount Requested

$5,000

Total Project Cost

$5,015

Description 

Objectives:

 

The aim of this project is to develop and maintain fruit and vegetable gardens across 12 classes and 1 preschool class. Each class will have their own garden bed where they will plant, grow and maintain a fruit and vegetable garden. The food garden will comprise of compost bins and a water tank to support learning about the nutrient cycle. The project will include:

·     13 raised garden beds to be assigned to 12 primary classes and 1 preschool class;

·     Compost bins, fertiliser and garden compost to create and educate students on mulching; and

·     Fruit and vegetable seed packets for distribution across garden beds for classes to grow, harvest, and develop healthy eating habits.

 

The school has already installed rainwater tanks and intends to expand sustainable water use practices by teaching students about rainwater harvesting techniques in the garden, such as moisture trapping. The project will also incorporate environmental improvement outcomes, including addressing and minimising carbon footprints, learning how to reduce ground, air, and noise pollution, and organic recycling and food production.

 

Outcomes:

·     Developing and improving student and staff understanding of the essential requirements for plants to grow and how to reduce organic waste in the environment through compost bins;

·     Raising awareness within the school on the importance of the immediate and local environment;

·     Providing opportunities for hands-on learning, inquiry, observation and experimentation across the school curriculum;

·     Providing a location to model sustainable practices and present environmental education lessons; and

·     Motivate students on healthy eating habits, promote physical activity and generate a sense of achievement.

COVID-19 Safety Plan

The school is following and working closely with the Australian Health Protection Principal Committee (AHPPC), NSW Health and other agencies to ensure it continues to operate in the safest ways possible during the COVID-19 pandemic. Currently, no parents or carers are allowed to partake in any school activities. A newsletter will be circulated informing parents and carers of the School’s Sustainable Garden Project (SSGP). When restrictions are lifted it is the intention to have families and the community assist with the garden project.

Beneficiaries 

·     295 students across 12 primary school classes and 1 preschool class; and

·     Teaching staff and parents and carers.

Assessment 

Recommended for Funding - $5,000

 

The applicant’s project aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 2 Strengthening and Protecting Our Environment and meets the Sustainable Environment Grants Program’s funding outcomes. The project supports students’ understanding of environmental sustainability and improves the school’s overall attitude towards caring for the environment. It promotes life-long healthy eating habits and connect students to practical exercises and experiences.

 

 

Expected program outcomes 7.5.1 - a), b), d), and e). 

 

Applicant 

Wattle Grove Public School P&C

Project 

School Garden

Amount Requested

$4,700

Total Project Cost

$4,700

Description 

Objectives:

 

The aim of the project is to create garden beds within the school grounds to grow fruit and vegetables. The garden beds will grow from seeds, early plants, developed plants and mature trees. The project will include:

·     Dedicated timber garden beds and soil;

·     Compost bins and worm farms to create mulch for the gardens;

·     Seedlings, plants, and mature trees to create gardens at various levels of propagation and harvesting; and

·     Tools and equipment to safely and individually tend to the garden.  

 

Students will learn the nutrient cycle through composting and depositing into worm farms to create fertilizer. Students will harvest the produce and replenish the garden as required with new and seasonal fruit and vegetables.

 

Outcomes:

·     Grow, produce, and harvest a continuous supply of various seasonal fruits and vegetables;

·     Reinvest yielded produce back into the garden to purchase seedlings and plants and ensure garden maintenance;

·     Demonstrate and regulate sustainable composting and mulching practices through organic waste and worm farm cultivation; and

·     Teach students the importance of eating healthier, less processed and packaged foods through incorporating the benefits of produce in lessons.

COVID-19 Safety Plan

There will be minimal people working on the garden at any one time. As per the school policy, all school visitors must sign in and out of the school, maintain distancing and ensure hands are washed and sanitised. Volunteer parents will not be in the playground at the same time as the students. There will be 1 volunteer per garden bed to ensure we are keeping to safe distances. Gardening tools will not be shared between volunteers and will be sanitised prior to and following use in the garden.

Beneficiaries 

·     Students and teaching staff of Wattle Grove Public School;

·     Parents and carers of students; and

·     Community members accessing the garden.

Assessment 

Recommended for Funding - $4,700

 

The applicant’s project aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 2 Strengthening and Protecting Our Environment and meets the Sustainable Environment Grants Program’s funding outcomes. The project supports practical integration of sustainable practices into the school curriculum, educates on the importance of healthy eating, and provides tangible pathways for students and staff to create ongoing environmental benefits for the school and community.

 

 

Expected program outcomes 7.5.1 - a), d), and e). 

 

 

Applicant 

Liverpool Women’s Health Centre

Project 

Darug Plants for Darug Land

Amount Requested

$3,150

Total Project Cost

$9,022

Description 

Objectives:

 

The aim of the project is to replant the Campbell Street boundary fence garden bed with native plants and extend the native corridor, providing habitat and food sources for native birds and wildlife. Invasive, non-native species will be removed from existing garden beds and replaced with local, drought tolerant evergreen plants. The project will include:

·     Removal of non-native and invasive species and improving soil quality;

·     Installation of timed irrigation system to reduce water wastage;

·     Sourcing and planting native species recommended through local stakeholder engagement; and

·     Creating a natural privacy screen using a variety of native screening plants.

 

Consultation with Council, Aboriginal Elders and the Australian Botanic Garden, Mount Annan will be conducted to inform the decision on what native varieties are indigenous to Liverpool LGA and appropriate to deliver the project.

 

Outcomes:

·     Contribute to Liverpool’s native habitat corridor by planting Indigenous flora;

·     Provide natural screening for the Centre and enable privacy for women and community members accessing the service;

·     Develop smarter water wastage solutions and reduce the Centre’s water consumption; and

·     Strengthen connection with Aboriginal community members who will be invited to share stories and insights of native plant selection.

COVID-19 Safety Plan

All participants will be required to wear masks and adhere to social distancing requirements outlined in NSW Health guidelines and the existing Liverpool Women’s Health Centre COVID Safety Plan.

Beneficiaries 

·     Community members accessing the Centre and services.

Assessment 

Recommended for Funding - $3,150

 

The applicant’s project aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 2 Strengthening and Protecting Our Environment and meets the Sustainable Environment Grants Program’s funding outcomes. The project addresses practical solutions for introducing and increasing the coverage of native plants in the Liverpool LGA and promotes sustainable water use and community participation.

 

 

Expected program outcomes 7.5.1 - a), b), c), d), and f). 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$100,000

$80,000

Nil

$80,000

COMMUNITY GRANTS

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$102,000

$97,000

Nil

$97,000

MATCHING GRANTS

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$200,000

$185,000

Nil

$185,000

SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT GRANTS*

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$75,000

$75,000

$15,850

$59,150

COMBINED FUNDING BALANCE

Combined Budget

Combined Balance

Total recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$477,000

$437,000

$15,850

$421,150

* Sustainable Environment Grants funding is via a rate levy and is only eligible to be used for the Sustainable Environment Grants Program.

Environment

Support schools and community groups to play an active role in reducing their impact on the environment and implementing environmentally sustainable actions.

Social

Support community organisations and groups to deliver services.

Civic Leadership

Role model to applicants, residents, and general public COVID-19 safe practices and procedures when supporting funding requests.

Legislative

Local Government Act 1993 - s356.

Risk

Risk of supporting these activities is considered low. Applicants have provided information on their compliance with COVID-19 safety guidelines published by NSW Health.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.       Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship Policy (Under separate cover) 

 


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 November 2020

City Community and Culture Report

 

COM 02

Post Public Exhibition report-Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage II Masterplan

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Implement access and equity for all members of the community

File Ref

297863.2020

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Tina Sangiuliano - Acting Director City Community and Culture

 

 

Executive Summary

On 21 November 2018, Council resolved to investigate a suitable use for the site known as Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage 2 (CHRPS2), in consultation with the community. Subsequently in July 2019, Council considered an Options Report and resolved to further investigate the proposed options through a Masterplan process.

The Draft Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage Two Masterplan was presented to Council at its meeting held on 29 July 2020. The Draft Masterplan presented four options for Council’s consideration, with Option 1 as the preferred option, recommending the following facilities:

·     Indoor swimming pool to deliver multiple programs including a 50m indoor pool;

·     Learn-to-swim and programmable water space;

·     Interactive leisure and water activities;

·     Gymnastics and multi-purpose dry spaces;

·     Associated aquatic support spaces include change rooms, storage and plant spaces;

·     External informal recreation space; and

·     External playing fields.

At this meeting, Council resolved to:

1.    Adopt the Draft Masterplan for Public Exhibition for community information and feedback for a period of 28 days; 

2.    Delegate to the A/CEO the finalisation of the draft Masterplan if no submissions are received; or

3.    Receive a further report outlining details of the submissions received at the conclusion of the exhibition period;

4.    Subject to Council adoption of the Masterplan, commission a detail design process to include a feasibility study and a funding strategy for the delivery of the project through a staging process; and

5.    Council prepare a lobbying brochure for this project.

The Draft Masterplan was placed on Public Exhibition from 19 August to 21 September 2020. A total of 27 online submissions and feedback from three Focus Groups were received. Public submissions and feedback from Focus Group consultations have been compiled and are presented as Attachment 1 of this report.

This report presents the key findings from the Public Exhibition period and the revised Draft Masterplan for Council’s consideration.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.      Receives and notes the report;

 

2.      Adopts the revised Draft Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage Two Masterplan, inclusive of the Public Exhibition feedback; and

 

3.    Subject to Council adoption of the Masterplan, commission a detail design process to include a feasibility study and a funding strategy for the delivery of the project through a staging process.

 

 

REPORT

1.   BACKGROUND

On 21 November 2018, Council resolved to investigate a suitable use for the site known as Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage 2 (CHRPS2), in consultation with the community. Subsequently in July 2019, Council considered an Options Report and resolved to adopt the Draft Masterplan for Public Exhibition for community information and feedback and receive a further report outlining details of the submissions received. Further, Council resolved to:

·     Subject to Council adoption of the Masterplan, commission a detail design process to include a feasibility study and a funding strategy for the delivery of the project through a staging process; and

·     Council prepare a lobbying brochure for this project.

The Draft Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage Two Masterplan was presented to Council at its meeting held on 29 July 2020. The draft Masterplan recommended the provision of the following facilities:

·    An aquatic facility with an indoor 50m competition pool, indoor learn-to-swim pool, indoor leisure pool and an indoor spa/steam/sauna area;

·     Associated aquatic support spaces, including change rooms, family and group/competition change areas, storage and plant spaces;

·     Two sporting fields with sizing suitable for rugby union, soccer and rugby league;

·     Outdoor water play area and children’s playground;

·     Basketball/multi-purpose courts;

·     New walkways and cycleways, and boardwalk connections to and from Precinct 1;

·     Access road from Cowpasture Road;

·     Passive recreational spaces and preservation of natural vegetations; and

·     Parking.

 

Additionally, the draft Masterplan identifies potential funding sources for detailed design and staged delivery.

Council officers developed a consultation plan seeking community and other key stakeholders’ input on the Draft Masterplan. This report responds to the above Council resolution of 29 July 2020, inclusive of Public Exhibition outcomes. 

 

2.   PUBLIC EXHIBITION OUTCOMES

In response to Item 1 of the Council Resolution from 29 July 2020, Council officers developed a plan seeking community and other stakeholders’ input, with a focus to inform and engage the local and neighbouring residents, as well as community and retail services. The Plan took into consideration the COVID-19 social distancing restrictions, and measures were taken to ensure adhering to NSW Health guidelines.

The table below outlines the Public Exhibition stages, inclusive of a description of the activities undertaken at each stage.

 

Engagement Stage

Action

Stage 1

Develop a communication and engagement plan

Stage 2

 

Communication and engagement methods

Online Surveys

·    Public Exhibition period was open from 19 August 2020 to 21 September 2020

·    Placement of surveys on Liverpool Listens from 19 August

Public Notifications

·    Notice on Council’s Facebook page to inform and direct community members to Liverpool Listens page to provide input. Two Facebook notices were posted on 28 August and 13 September respectively

·    Developed A3-posters and A5-flyers directing residents to the Liverpool Listens page

·    The posters/flyers were displayed on the notice boards at Carnes Hill Community Centre, Michael Clarke Recreation Centre, Carnes Hill Library, Black Elk Café and Liverpool Library

Focus Group Consultations

·    Presentation on the Draft Masterplan at the New Release/Established District Forum on 31 August 2020

·    Consulted Belgravia Leisure on 8 September 2020 seeking feedback on proposed facilities

·    Consulted Charter Hall-Carnes Hill Marketplace management on 8 August 2020 seeking feedback on proposed plans

Stage 3

Compiling feedback received through online surveys and stakeholders’ consultations

2.1 Liverpool Listens

The Draft Masterplan was placed on Public Exhibition from 19 August to 21 September 2020. An online survey was published on Liverpool Listens page seeking community input on the proposed plans.

Two notices on Council’s Facebook page was posted on 28 August and 13 September, reaching around 4,700 people, to inform and direct residents to Liverpool Listens page. The notices were viewed 171 times and received 76 reactions, comments and shares. There were no negative comments posted.

 

During the exhibition period, Council received a total of 27 submissions through the online surveys. Attachment 1 records all received submissions along with the officer and consultant’s response to the comments received.

The key comments and themes received through Liverpool Listens are as follows:

·    Congratulating Council and support for the Draft Masterplan;

·    Suggestion to explore vehicular connection from Precinct One to Precinct Two;

·    Concerns on future traffic congestion on Cowpasture Rd and Pacific Palms Circuit;

·    Concerns on the proposed roundabout near Hoxton Park Public School entry;

·    Concerns on the number of proposed parking spaces and lighting provisions;

·    Provision of spectator seating, benches and sideline referees between the sports fields;

·    Suggestion on provision of running tacks.

·    Suggestion on pedestrian or signalised crossing at Cowpasture Rd;

·    Suggestion on provision of bicycle lane and its connectivity to the broader bicycle lane network;

·    Suggestions for outdoor tennis courts, badminton courts and volleyball, and outdoor roller skating and winter outdoor skating;

·    Suggestions of outdoor swimming pool; and

·    Suggestions for sensory garden.

2.2 Focus Group consultations

New Release/Established District Forum

The Draft Masterplan was presented to the New Release/Established District Forum on 31 August 2020. At the Forum, residents inquired and provided feedback on provision of parking spaces and delivery timeline for the proposed facilities.

Belgravia Leisure and Charter Hall (Carnes Hill Marketplace)

Council officers and the consultants met with Belgravia Leisure and Charter Hall (Carnes Hill Marketplace) management on 8 September 2020 to understand their plans and identify any concerns and/or feedback regarding the Draft Masterplan. Belgravia Leisure and Charter Hall expressed their support for the proposed facilities in the Draft Masterplan. The key feedback provided related to provision of parking spaces, traffic assessment and vehicular connectivity to avoid future traffic congestions on Cowpasture Rd and Pacific Palms Circuit. Details of feedback and responses are included in Attachment 1.

2.3 Summary of feedback received during Public Exhibition

The table below provides summary of the comments and feedback received from the Public Exhibition and Focus Group consultations.

Feedback

Council Officer/Consultant response

Most of the respondents had concerns around the traffic congestion on Cowpasture Rd and the roundabout proposed on Pacific Palms Circuit.

This will be addressed through a detailed Traffic Engineering Study that will form part of the detailed Business Case.

The respondents expressed concerns around the provision of parking spaces in Stage Two and considered it insufficient.

The proposed number of parking spaces is based on annual visitation assumption model. The current preferred benchmark is 1 space per 2,500 visitations. This warrants for 200 parking spaces and the Draft Masterplan provides for 270 spaces.

The respondents recommended consideration of other outdoor sports (badminton and tennis) to be integrated with the outdoor basketball courts.

The revised Draft Masterplan will include outdoor basketball courts as multi-use courts (line marked for minimum 4 sports).

Including a cricket pitch between soccer fields.

The revised Draft Masterplan recommends a cricket pitch between the two soccer fields.

Inclusion of sensory experience/garden/play.

The revised Draft Masterplan recommends sensory experience in the outdoor children’s play area.

Vehicular connection from Precinct One.

Indicative location is recommended in the revised Draft Masterplan. The location will be confirmed through detailed Traffic Engineering Assessment Study.

 

Feedback from Focus Group consultations

What number of parking spaces will be delivered along with the sports fields as a part of the Phase 1 delivery of the project?

This will be determined through the detailed Business Case, which will also explore funding resources for the staged delivery of the project.

Detailed traffic assessment to avoid congestion on Cowpasture Rd and Pacific Palms Circuit

Traffic and parking implications will be the subject of a detailed Traffic Engineering Study that will form part of the detailed Business Case

Further details of vehicular connection from Stage Two to Carnes Hill Marketplace

Traffic and parking implications will be the subject of a detailed Traffic Engineering Study that will form part of the detailed Business Case

 

3.   REVISED DRAFT MASTERPLAN

In consideration of the submissions received during Public Exhibition period and the feedback from Focus Group consultations, this report recommends the following amendments to the Draft Masterplan:

1.   No changes to the proposed number of parking spaces;

2.   Inclusion of a cricket pitch between the two soccer fields;

3.   Inclusion of sensory experience/garden/play within the outdoor children’s play area;

4.   Mark outdoor basketball courts for provision of multi-use netball and tennis courts. Multi-use courts are usually marked for four sports. Marking basketball courts for compatibility with netball and tennis, with capacity to add one more sport in future;

5.   Inclusion of an indicative location of the vehicular connection from Precinct One to Precinct Two. The location to be confirmed through the detailed Traffic Engineering Assessment Study; and

6.   Inclusion of a running track through/around the site.

 

4.   PROJECT LOBBY BROCHURE

At the Council meeting on 29 July 2020, Council resolved to prepare a lobby brochure to promote and source funding for the project. The Community Development and Planning team have collaborated with the Communications team and have developed a draft brochure. The draft brochure outlines Council’s vision for the precinct, a summary of recommended facilities and concept designs, and benefits to the Liverpool community. A copy of the draft brochure is attached to the report.

 

5.   GRANT APPLICATION

The Metropolitan Greenspace Program is an annual grants program that provides seed funding to assist councils in Greater Sydney and the Central Coast region to deliver projects that improve regional open space and community livability. Council has used this grant opportunity and applied for the Site Investigations and Feasibility Study. Council has applied for $250,000 to match with funds ($250,000) identified in the Capital Works Budget 20/21.

Applications were assessed in October 2020 and an announcement on the successful applicants are expected in November 2020.

 

6.   HIGH LEVEL PROGRAM

Subject to Council’s endorsement of the final Masterplan, it is recommended that necessary investigations and studies be undertaken to determine the feasibility of proposed facilities, develop a funding strategy, and delivery staging options to suit funding. The following table presents a high-level timeline for the various critical stages of this project.

Activity

Estimated Duration

Estimated Start

Estimated Finish

1.   Feasibility study and/or business case, funding strategy and site investigations (traffic etc)

26 weeks (excluding Christmas/New Year closure period)

December 2020

April 2021

2.   Council approval of project and funding

4 weeks

May 2021

May 2021

3.   Detailed design

26 weeks

June 2021

November 2021

4.   Development consent

24 weeks

December 2021

May 2022

5.   Tender documentation

24 weeks

June 2022

November 2022

6.   Tender process

14 weeks

December 2022

March 2023

7.   Council acceptance of tender

4 weeks

April 2023

April 2023

8.   Contract formation and award

8 weeks

May 2023

June 2023

9.   Construction

The project will be delivered in two stages (Part 1 and Part 2), subject to the availability of funds.

96 weeks

July 2023

June 2025

 

6.1 Budget Phasing

The following budget provisions will need to be made to enable the necessary investigations, detailed designs and planning approvals to be completed.

Description

Estimated Budget

Estimated Year/s

Status

STAGE 1:

Detailed Business Case:

·    Site feasibility study;

·    Environmental Assessment study;

·    Traffic Engineering Study; and

·    Funding strategy

$250,000

2020/21

Applied for $250,000 under the MGP 2019/20.

STAGE 2:

·    Detailed Design of the adopted Masterplan; and

·    DA preparation

$1M

2021/22 and 2022/23

Not commenced

STAGE 3: Construction and project management

 

Part 1: Construction and delivery of sporting fields, outdoor courts and adjacent parking

 

Part 2: Construction and delivery of the aquatic facilities and the remainder parking

$77M

2023/24 and 2024/25

Part 1: $5,1716,419 identified within the Contributions Plan for the sporting fields.

On 26 August 2019, Council resolved to dedicate funds from the disposal of Lot 88 DP1236888. Additional $4,638,995 is available from the above land disposal for the development of CHRPS2.

NOTE: Approximately $4M identified for a local or district community facility within Cecil Hills, Hoxton Park and Carnes Hill. Further investigation is required to determine the feasibility of transferring these funds to CHRPS2.

Part 2: Not commenced.

Estimated Total

$78,250,000

 

10. CONCLUSION

In consideration to community and other stakeholders’ feedback through the Public Exhibition period, this report presents the revised Draft Masterplan for Council’s consideration. The revised Draft Masterplan is attached to this report as Attachment 1.

Subject to Council’s endorsement of the Draft Masterplan, Council officers will commence the necessary investigations and studies to develop an implementation and funding strategy, through a staged delivery.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Funds required for the development and construction stages.

Enhance the environmental performance of buildings and homes.

Facilitate economic development.

Environment

Enhance the environmental performance of buildings and homes.

Protect, enhance and maintain areas of endangered ecological communities and high quality bushland as part of an attractive mix of land uses.


Social

Support access and services for people with a disability.

Deliver high quality services for children and their families.


Civic Leadership

Undertake communication practices with the community and stakeholders across a range of media.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

Risk

The risk is deemed Low.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage Two-Revised Masterplan (Under separate cover)

2.         Facebook Post Performance Report

3.         Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage Two-Public Exhibition feedback and response

4.         Draft Advocacy Brochure CRPMPS2


1

COM 02

Post Public Exhibition report-Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage II Masterplan

Attachment 2

Facebook Post Performance Report

 

 


1

COM 02

Post Public Exhibition report-Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage II Masterplan

Attachment 3

Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage Two-Public Exhibition feedback and response

 

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1

COM 02

Post Public Exhibition report-Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage II Masterplan

Attachment 4

Draft Advocacy Brochure CRPMPS2

 

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1

Ordinary Meeting 25 November 2020

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 01

Investment Report October 2020

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Seek efficient and innovative methods to manage our resources

File Ref

292649.2020

Report By

John Singh - Accountant - Investments & Treasury Management

Approved By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer

 

 

executive summary

 

This report details Council’s investment portfolio and its performance for the month ended 31st  October 2020:

·    Council held investments with a market value of $299 million;

·    The economic environment globally, including Australia, suffered significantly from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in March. The market value of Council’s investment in Floating Rate Notes (FRN) has since improved;

·    RBA has decided to lower cash rate to 0.10% with an indication to keep it at this level for next three years. This will have significant impact on Council interest earnings;

·    The portfolio yield was 123 basis points above the AusBond Bank Bill index;

 

AusBond Bank Bill Index (BBI)

Benchmark

0.51%

Portfolio yield

1.74%

Performance above benchmarks

1.23%

 

·    Return on investment was $701k lower than the original budget;

·    Council’s investment advisor, Amicus Advisory, has completed its review of Emerald Mortgage Backed Securities and recommends Council continue to hold its investments in the “Class A” and both “Class C” securities given current poor market pricing. MBS Securities are now not rated;

·    Council’s investments and reporting obligations fully complied with the requirements of section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993 and clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005;

·    Council’s portfolio also fully complied with limits set out in its current Investment Policy; and

·    Council is committed to NSW TCorp’s balanced investment framework and held 19.32% of its portfolio in ADI’s rated BBB and below.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

REPORT

 

Clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the Responsible Accounting Officer must provide Council with a written report setting out details of all money that Council has invested under section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Council’s Portfolio

 

At 31st October 2020, Council held investments with a market value of $299 million. Council’s investment register detailing all its investments is provided as an attachment to this report. In summary, Council’s portfolio consisted of investments in:

 

         

         

The ratio of market value compared to face value of various debt securities is shown in the table below.

Asset Class

Oct-20

Jun-20

Senior Debts (FRN's ,TCD's & FRB)*

101.46%

100.75%

MBS (Reverse Mortgage Backed Securities)

67.01%

62.11%

T-Corp Unit Trusts

103.06%

102.81%

 

 

 

*Definition of terms

·      Transferrable Certificate of Deposit (TCD) - security issued with the same characteristics as a Term Deposit however it can be sold back (transferred) into the market prior to maturity. A floating TCD pays a coupon linked to a variable benchmark (90 days BBSW).

·      Fixed Rate Bond (FRB) – returns Fixed Coupon (interest) Rate and is tradeable before maturity.

 

The economic environment globally, including Australia, suffered significantly from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in March. The market value of Council’s investment in FRN’s has since improved. Council has sufficient funds in its current account and has no plans at this stage to sell off any of its FRN’s to meet its short-term cashflow requirements.

 

Council is fully compliant with the requirements of the Ministerial Investment Order including the grandfathering provisions. The grandfathering provisions state that Council may continue to hold to maturity, redeem or sell investments that comply with previous Ministerial Investment Orders. Any new investments must comply with the most recent Order. Council continues to closely monitor the investments in its portfolio to ensure continued compliance and minimal exposure to risk.

 

Council is committed to NSW TCorp’s balanced investment framework and held 19.32% of its portfolio in ADI’s rated BBB and below.

 

Emerald – Mortgaged Backed Securities

Council’s new investment advisor, Amicus Advisory, was asked on appointment to review Council’s investments in “grandfathered” mortgage backed securities. Amicus has completed its review and recommends Council continue to hold its investments in the “Class A” and both “Class C” securities given current poor market pricing. Notwithstanding this recommendation, Amicus has assessed both “Class C” securities are likely to eventually default. However, Council will continue to receive interest up until default which is likely many years away. Fitch Rating Agency has decided to withdraw its rating on mortgage backed securities and as a result, Council investments in these securities are now classed non-rated.

 

 

Portfolio Maturity Profile

 

The table below shows the percentage of funds invested at different durations to maturity.

 

 

Market Value by Issuer and Institution Policy limit as per Investment Policy

 


 

Overall Portfolio Credit Framework compliance to Investment Policy

 

 

 

Portfolio performance against relevant market benchmark.

 

Council’s Investment Policy prescribes the AusBond Bank Bill Index (ABBI) as a benchmark to measure return on cash and fixed interest securities. The ABBI represents the average daily yield of a parcel of bank bills. Historically there has been a positive correlation between changes in the cash rate and the resulting impact on the ABBI benchmark.

 

The portfolio yield to 31st October 2020 exceeded the AusBond Bank Bill index by 123 basis points (1.74% against 0.51%)

 

Council portfolio continues to perform at above benchmark rates despite ongoing margin contraction and significantly lower market term deposit yields. Comparative yields for the previous months are charted below:

 

 

 

 

 


 

Performance of Portfolio Returns against Budget

 

Council’s investment income for October 2020 is lower than the original budget by $701k.

 

 

Investment Portfolio at a Glance

 

 

Portfolio Performance

MCWB01114_0000[1]

The portfolio yield to 31st October 2020 exceeded the AusBond Bank Bill index by 123 basis points (1.74% against 0.51%).

Annual Income vs. Budget

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Council’s investment interest income is lower than the original budget by $701k as at 31st October 2020 and will be closely monitored.

 

Investment Policy Compliance

 

Legislative Requirements

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Portfolio Credit Rating Limit

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Institutional Exposure Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Overall Portfolio Credit Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Term to Maturity Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

 

 

Economic Outlook – Reserve Bank of Australia

 

The Reserve Bank decided to lower the cash rate by 15 basis point in its meeting on 3rd 

November 2020.The current 0.10 per cent cash rate is at a historically low level and impacts returns on investment.

 

Certificate of Responsible Accounting Officer

 

The Chief Financial Officer, as Responsible Accounting Officer, certifies that the investments listed in the attached report have been made in accordance with section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 and Council’s Investment Policy at the time of their placement. The previous investments are covered by the grandfathering clauses of the current investment guidelines issued by the Minister for Local Government.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Council’s investment interest income is lower than the original budget by $701k as at 31st October 2020 and will be closely monitored.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Council is fully compliant with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1993 – Investment Order (authorized investments) and with reporting requirements under clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

Risk

The capital value and return on investment is subject to market risks. Investment limits prescribed in Council’s policy framework is aimed to mitigate these risks.

Market interest is expected to stay at its lowest rate for a long period and will continue to put pressure on Council’s budget.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Investment Portfolio - October 2020

   


1

CORP 01

Investment Report October 2020

Attachment 1

Investment Portfolio - October 2020

 

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1

Ordinary Meeting

25 November 2020

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 02

Council Meeting Dates - January to December 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Increase community engagement

File Ref

294354.2020

Report By

George Georgakis - Manager Council and Executive Services

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director City Corporate

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The purpose of this report is to confirm the Council meeting schedule for 2021. It is proposed that Council meetings for the 2021 calendar year continue to be held monthly commencing at 6.00pm and be held on the last Wednesday of the month, with exceptions where required.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Confirms the Council meeting time as 6.00pm and Council meeting dates for the 2021 calendar year as follows:

 

·    3 February 2021

·    24 February 2021

·    31 March 2021

·    28 April 2021

·    26 May 2021

·    30 June 2021

·    28 July 2021

·    25 August 2021

·    20 October 2021

·    17 November 2021

·    15 December 2021

 

2.   Advertises the Council meeting dates and commencing times of Council meetings for the 2021 calendar year. 

 

 


 

REPORT

 

Section 365 of the Local Government Act 1993 stipulates that Councils must meet at least 10 time per year, each time in a different month. Section 366 of the Act makes provision for additional meetings to be called if necessary.

 

To assist in meeting statutory requirements and provide reporting consistency, it is proposed that the Council meetings for the 2021 calendar year remain on a monthly cycle, on the last Wednesday of each commencing at 6.00pm. The exception to this will be January (no meeting), September (no meeting), October (first meeting of the new Council) and November (meeting proposed for the third Wednesday of the month) and December (meeting proposed for the third Wednesday of the month).

 

As in previous year, a meeting in early February 2021 is recommended to be held to deal with business accumulated during the January break.

 

It is proposed that no meeting be held in September due to the Local Government Election which will be held on 4 September 2021. The first meeting of the new Council is proposed for 20 October 2021.

 

In 2016, the year of the previous Council elections, the last meeting of the outgoing Council was held on 31 August 2016, and the first meeting of the current Council was held on 12 October 2016.

 

The November meeting is recommended to be held on the third Wednesday of November to allow for more even spacing of meetings at the end of the year. The December meeting is recommended to be held on the third Wednesday, to allow time for resolutions to be actioned (where possible) before the Christmas break.

 

Additional meetings can be called at any time if necessary, subject to appropriate notice provisions. These could cater for extraordinary matters that arise from time to time or to prevent agenda items becoming too voluminous.

 

It is recommended that Council adopts the meeting dates for the 2021 calendar year as outlined in Table 1.


 

Table 1 – Proposed Council meeting dates 2021

Meeting date

Comments

3 February 2021

First meeting after January break to deal with accumulated business.

24 February 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

31 March 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

28 April 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

26 May 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

30 June 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

28 July 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

25 August 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

No meeting in September due to Local Government Elections

 

20 October 2021

First meeting of the new Council.

17 November 2021

Third Wednesday of the month.

15 December 2021

Third Wednesday of the month.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Raise awareness in the community about the available services and facilities.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct

Legislative

Section 365 and 366 of the Local Government Act 1993

Risk

The risk is deemed to be low and is considered to be within Council’s risk appetite.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 November 2020

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 03

Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

295736.2020

Report By

Jessica Saliba - Acting Coordinator Governance

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director City Corporate

 

 

Executive Summary

 

On the 22nd June 2018 the NSW Audit Office released their report on the sector-wide performance audit of fraud controls in Councils. The report assessed Councils’ fraud controls against the Audit Office’s Fraud Control Improvement Kit.

 

The Office of Local Government recommended that Council’s review their fraud controls and assess their efficacy against the Audit Office’s Fraud Control Improvement Kit.

 

The Fraud and Corruption Policy was last reviewed and adopted on the 25th February 2015. A systemic review of the policy which now incorporates recommendations of the NSW Audit Office Fraud Control Improvement Kit, has been undertaken.  The revised version is attached to this report for consideration by Council.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopt the Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy.

 

 

REPORT

 

The Audit Office of New South Wales released the findings of the performance audit of Fraud Controls in Local Government. As a result, the Governance Unit has completed a systematic review of the Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy incorporating both the recommendations of the NSW Audit Office (via the performance audit undertaken) and the strategies detailed in the Fraud and Corruption toolkit developed by the NSW Audit Office.

 

The fundamentals for corruption prevention include elements such as leadership styles and the ethical climate within Council and formalised systems and processes (such as the code of conduct and an internal reporting system).

The success of the fraud and corruption prevention framework will be dependent on the commitment of the organisation and the adequate resourcing required to implement and maintain a viable risk-defined fraud and corruption framework.

 

This policy will establish Council’s Fraud and Corruption Control framework and will implement strategies and actions to manage fraud and corruption. The policy looks at Prevention, Detection and Response. These are all components that were not identified in the previous policy. The previous policy also lacked in the area of identifying a prevention system, fraud and awareness notification systems and detection and investigation systems. These have now been incorporated in the new policy. 

 

After the policy was drafted Governance consulted with the following stakeholders:

·    Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee on 26 July 2019 and subsequently endorsed.

·    Internal Audit on 11 July 2019.

·    3 union organisations which consist of Development and Environmental Professionals’ Association (DEPA), New South Wales Local Government, Clerical, Administrative, Energy, Airlines & Utilities Union (USU) and LGEA. No feedback received.

·    Executive Management Team and the Acting Chief Executive Officer endorsed the policy on 23 October 2020.

·    Joint Consultative Committee (JCC) on 5 November 2020 and was endorsed.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Independent Commission Against Corruption Act 1988 and the Local Government Act 1993.

Risk

The risk is deemed to be Low

If the Council does not have a Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy, the Council will not have a framework that will implement strategies and actions to manage fraud and corruption in the workplace.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy


1

CORP 03

Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy

Attachment 1

Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy

 

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1

Ordinary Meeting 25 November 2020

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2020

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Meet the challenges of Liverpool’s growing population

File Ref

297880.2020

Report By

Earl Paradeza - Senior Management Accountant

Approved By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer

 

 

Executive Summary

 

In July 2020 Council adopted its 2020/21 operating budget with projected revenue of $295.8m and expenditure of $205.1m. In terms of the net operating result before grants and contributions provided for capital purposes, Council is budgeted for an operating deficit of $5.691m.

 

The proposed budget changes will further increase the budgeted operating deficit before grants and contributions for capital purposes to $6.736m ((Ref attachment 1 – Note D).

 

The first quarter budget review for 2020/21 has resulted in $0.158m overall increase in Council’s capital expenditure program (Ref attachment 1 – Note E)

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council approves the identified budget variations in accordance with this report.

 

 

 

REport

 

Legislative Requirements

Clause 203(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires the Responsible Accounting Officer to provide a quarterly budget review not later than two months after each quarter's end. This report provides an overview of the results on the financial review for the quarter ended 30 September 2020.


 

 

Commentary

 

Operating Budget

 

In July 2020, Council adopted its 2020/21 operating budget with projected revenue of $295.8m and expenditure of $205.1m. In terms of the net operating result before grants and contributions provided for capital purposes, the Council budgeted for an operating deficit of $5.691m.

 

A comprehensive budget review conducted at 30 September 2020 has resulted in further budget adjustments, as detailed in Attachment 2. As part of the Budget Review, managers have conducted a review of their programs with a view to providing a revised forecast for the financial year ended 30 June 2021. Managers take into consideration events that have occurred to date and/or information that has become available since the adoption of the original budget and the impact of which provides the basis for the budget adjustments.

 

The review has resulted in $5.693m (Ref attachment 1 – Note A) increase in total revenue mainly attributable to the following:

·    +$3.0m    Western Sydney Planning Partnership funding from Dept of Planning;

·    +$1.4m    Local Roads and Community Infrastructure Grants for Schoeffel Park;

·    +$1.3m    DITRDC Grant funding under the Western Sydney Infrastructure Plan;

·    +$1.3m    Liveability Grant for Phillip Park – Lurnea Community Hub redevelopment;

·    +$0.6m    Additional contribution from Canterbury Bankstown Council towards repairs to Georges River Footbridge Voyager Point;

·    -$2.0m     50% of settlement received from Federal Government for repairs to Georges River Footbridge Voyager Point last financial year; and

·    -$200k     Decrease in ex-gratia payment from Moorebank Intermodal Company

 

Total expenditure is projected to increase by net $3.831m (Ref attachment 1 – Note B), mainly comprising:

·    +$3.0m    Consultancy works funded from Western Sydney Partnership Planning grant;

·    +$500k    Retrospective adjustment to ex-gratia payments from Moorebank Intermodal Company (from 1/1/17 – 30/6/20);

·    +$160k    Consultancy to review Dam Safety Emergency Plan to comply with new legislative requirements;

·    +$100k    Liverpool Collaboration Area Open Space Assessment; and

·    +$50k      Grant funded Creation Station art workshop run through local schools.

 

The proposed budget changes will increase the budgeted operating deficit before grants and contributions for capital purposes to $6.736m (Ref attachment 1 – Note D).

 

Capital Budget

 

In July 2020, Council approved its $148.3m capital works program for 2020/21. Council subsequently approved carry over of projects valued $23.4m that were planned but not completed in 2019/20.

 

The first quarter budget review has resulted in $0.158m increase to Council’s capital expenditure program (Ref attachment 1 – Note E). The budget adjustments include the following:

·    +$1.4m    Funds to match allocated grants for landscape and park upgrade works at Schoeffel Park;

·    +$1.3m    Grant funded upgrade works  at Heathcote and Walder Roads; and

·    -$2.6m     Reversal of LCP design and documentation costs already included in the total construction costs.

·    -$500k     Reversal of Council Website Modernisation project

 

At 30 September 2020, Council has a capital expenditure program of $172.1m as detailed in Attachment 3.

 

The YTD capital expenditure to 30 September 2020 was $15.6m.

 

The Table 1 below provides summary of the budget results:

 

 

Details of the proposed budget changes are provided in the attachments.

 

Attachment 1 - Quarter 1 Budget Review Summary (QBRS): This report presents a summary of Council's budgeted financial position at end of the quarter. The key indicators include:

1.   The revised budgeted income and expenditure for the year against the original estimate of annual income and expenditure as shown in Council’s Operational Plan

2.   Changes following Quarter 1 budget review

3.   The proposed revised budget for 2020/21 financial year

 

Attachment 2 – This report provides details of operating budget adjustments

 

Attachment 3 – This report provides details of capital budget adjustments

 

Attachment 4 & 5 – Grants Status Report: Has two components, first listing all annual grant submissions and second, listing all grants that have been applied for during the quarter detailing the project title, amount sought, funding body and status of the application. Council officers are continually seeking alternate sources of funding as opportunities arise.

 

Attachment 6 - Cash and Investments Statement: Providing a reconciliation of restricted and unrestricted funds to the level of Cash and Investments held as at 30 September 2020

 


 

Attachment 8 - Consultancy and Legal Expenses

 

Attachment 9 - Contracts and Other Expenses

 

Attachment 10 - City Development Fund and Environment Levy

 

This Report recommends that Council receives and notes the report and votes the budget variations in accordance with this report.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

The revised budget net operating result before Grants and Contributions following Quarter 3 Budget Review and Council resolutions to 30 September 2020 will be a deficit of $6.736m.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Risk

Clause 203(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires the Responsible Accounting Officer to provide a quarterly budget review not later than two months after each quarter's end. Breach of legislation if not done.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         QBRS - Consolidated Financial Results

2.         Operating Budget Adjustments

3.         Capital Budget Adjustments

4.         Grant Status Report - Applications

5.         Grant Status Report - Received

6.         Cash & Investment Report

7.         Key Performance Indicators

8.         Consultancy & Legal Expenses Budget Review Statement

9.         Contracts & Other Expenses Statements

10.       City Development Fund & Environment Levy Reserves     


1

CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2020

Attachment 1

QBRS - Consolidated Financial Results

 

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1

CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2020

Attachment 2

Operating Budget Adjustments

 

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1

CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2020

Attachment 3

Capital Budget Adjustments

 

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1

CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2020

Attachment 4

Grant Status Report - Applications

 

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1

CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2020

Attachment 5

Grant Status Report - Received

 

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1

CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2020

Attachment 6

Cash & Investment Report

 

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1

CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2020

Attachment 7

Key Performance Indicators

 

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1

CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2020

Attachment 8

Consultancy & Legal Expenses Budget Review Statement

 

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1

CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2020

Attachment 9

Contracts & Other Expenses Statements

 

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1

CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2020

Attachment 10

City Development Fund & Environment Levy Reserves

 

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1

Ordinary Meeting

25 November 2020

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 05

Proposed Funding - Edmondson Park Basin 14

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Meet the challenges of Liverpool’s growing population

Key Policy

Long-Term Financial Plan

File Ref

299079.2020

Report By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director City Corporate

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s in principle approval to borrow funds and accelerate the delivery of a specific s7.11 infrastructure project that has a cost in excess of that identified in the Liverpool Contributions Plan 2008 – Edmondson Park. The proposal is to repay principal loan and interest by using a portion of interest earned on s7.11 contribution funds held.

 

The proposal will enable the delivery of local infrastructure projects without the need to borrow funds from other contributions plans, reduce the need to source funding through general revenue or special rate variation, and provide funds in the most timely manner, which will accelerate the delivery of local infrastructure envisioned in relevant Contributions Plans.

 

It is proposed that this approach be used initially for the Basin 14 Edmondson Park project and subsequently for other key s7.11 infrastructure projects.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1.    Approves in principle to borrow funds to accelerate the delivery of s7.11 infrastructure;

2.    Delegates authority to the A/CEO to make an application to NSW TCorp to borrow $4.7m as a contribution to the Basin 14 Edmondson Park Project;

3.    Notes that the loan principal and interest repayments will be made from interest earnings on funds held in s7.11 reserve;

4.    Delegates authority to the A/CEO and Council’s nominated Power of Attorney holder to execute any required documentation to give effect to this resolution; and

5.    Delegates authority to the A/CEO to apply for interest subsidy in the next round of NSW Government’s Low Cost Loan Initiative.

 

 

REPORT

 

This report seeks Council’s in principle approval to borrow funds from NSW TCorp to fund the shortfall in s7.11 contributions for Basin 14 in Edmondson Park.

 

Project Description

 

The proposed flood detention basin (Basin 14) in Edmondson Park release area provides a 48ML flood storage capacity to facilitate land filling and occupation of lands that would otherwise remain flood prone and unable to be developed. The project has provision for water quality improvement, pedestrian walkways and wetland with viewing platform. The overall project also includes a provision for children's play area at the southern side of the basin. The cost breakdown and funding sources are tabulated as follows:

 

Land acquisition (Bain & Children’s play area

$18.8m

Basin construction

$12.7m

Children’s play area construction

$1.0m

Total

$31.5m

Funded by:

 

 S7.11 Contributions Reserve

$16.0m

 Housing Acceleration Fund (HAF) Grant

$10.8m

Total

$26.8m

 

 

Shortfall

$4.7m

 

 

S7.11 Background

 

Council collects financial contributions from developers to fund local infrastructure identified in response to growth and increased demand generated by new development. These contributions are determined and provided in accordance with the relevant Contribution Plan applicable to the development.


 

 

A shortfall in funds to deliver local infrastructure is an industry wide issue. Two key reasons for the shortfall are the cap on contributions councils can collect imposed by the NSW Government and the significant increase in land prices (much more than quarterly indexation applied). Councils are consistently on a lookout for State/ Federal grants to fund any shortfalls.

 

Proposal

 

Council, like many other Councils in NSW, is holding large sum of contributions collected over many years. The investment earnings are allocated to various plans, however, is not significant enough to decrease the gap in funding shortfall. Council staff have a number of different options to fast track the delivery of S7.11 infrastructure. This initiative will accelerate delivery of critical infrastructure especially those that can be co-funded by grants. Basin 14 in Edmondson Park is considered an ideal project that can be used to pilot this initiative. This initiative will not resolve the funding shortfall but will assist Council to deliver at least a few priority projects.

 

Benefits of this approach

 

This proposal will enable delivery of local infrastructure projects without needing to borrow funds from other contributions plans, therefore removing the issue of an inability to recoup funds. This approach will also reduce the need to find additional funding through general revenue or special rate variation. Finally, this is an approach that will provide the funds required in the timeliest manner, enabling work to continue unabated and provide the local infrastructure envisioned in the relevant Contributions Plan.

 

Legal advice

 

Given the increased focus on the way in which councils use externally restricted funds, especially after a recent report by NSW Audit Office, it was considered appropriate to obtain legal advice as to the efficacy of the approach.

 

Council received legal advice from Bartier Perry Lawyers on 28 August 2020. It is their opinion that:

 

“there is no legal impediment to Council using the developer contributions (including interest accrued by Council in respect of those contributions) towards payment of a loan, but only on the basis that the loan is taken out for the purpose of providing the public amenities or public service for which the contribution was made.” 


 

 

In addition to this, they also identified several alternate options to funding, including pooling of contributions funds and using general revenue to address the funding gap. These are initiatives that Council has explored and dismissed previously as they do not appropriately minimise direct funding for infrastructure that is to be delivered under a Contributions Plan.

 

Based on the legal advice, there is no impediment towards payment of a loan using interest earned from developer contributions accounts, but only on the basis that the loan is taken out for the purpose of providing the relevant public amenity for which the contribution was made and not for an unrelated purpose for which the contribution was intended. The initiative proposed in this report is consistent with this advice.

 

Financial Analysis

 

At 30 June 2020, Council held $169m in developer contributions.

 

Based on current projected collections and expenditure on planned infrastructure, Council will still hold funds in excess of $85m after 10 years from now.

 

Council anticipates receiving annually on average $1.5m in interest on the money held as a restricted asset in our contribution account. Given current market conditions, the interest earning has dropped significantly (last 5-year average was approximately $3m in interest).

 

Based on current cost estimates, Council will need to borrow $4.7m for Edmondson Park – Basin 14 which will incur $521,000 per year in repayments over a 10 - year term for full repayment.

 

This project will ultimately optimise stormwater management within Edmondson Park and will support the release of land in a high-priority development area, supporting increased and accelerated housing supply. The outcomes would qualify Council for NSW Government’s Low Cost Loan Initiative (LCLI) and Council can seek 50% interest subsidy if the program continues in 2021.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

The proposal will accelerate delivery of critical infrastructure identified in s7.11 contribution plans. The principal and interest repayments will be made from interest earnings on s7.11 contribution funds held by Council.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Basin 14 includes the provision of a park and open space which will deliver social benefits to the local community.


Civic Leadership

There are no Civic Leadership and Governance considerations. 

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

Risk

The earnings on investment margin are very tight in the current market. There is a risk of Council being unable to earn sufficient interest to cover principal and interest payments.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 November 2020

City Corporate Report

 

CORP 06

Mayoral Direction pursuant to Section 226(d) of the Local Government Act 1993

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

300677.2020

Report By

George Georgakis - Manager Council and Executive Services

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director City Corporate

 

 

Executive Summary

 

To report to Council on one instance where the Mayor pursuant to Section 226(d) of the Local Government Act 1993 exercised in cases of necessity, the policy-making functions of the governing body of the Council between meetings of the Council. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council note and endorse the Mayoral Direction dated 5 November 2020 attached to the report.

 

 

REPORT

 

Section 226 of the Local Government Act 1993 outlines the role of the Mayor and Section 226(d) states that the role includes the following:

 

“To exercise, in cases of necessity, the policy-making functions of the governing body of the Council between meetings of the Council”.

 

On 5 November 2020, the Mayor made a determination/direction pursuant to the policy-making responsibilities under s.226(d) of the Act.

 

The Mayoral Direction relates to directing the Acting CEO to amend the wording of two of the motions (on the issues of “Fast track major rail projects” and “Tolls in NSW”) to be submitted to the NSW Local Government Conference to be held on Monday 23 November 2020. The reason for this is because the Acting CEO received correspondence from LGNSW advising that to be accepted for debate at the conference, motions need to be sufficiently broad enough to apply to local government as a sector and can’t favour individual councils or projects. The email to the Acting CEO which outlines the wording adopted by Council and the amended new wording which was approved by the Mayor is attached to the Mayoral Direction.

 

The determination/direction was necessary and could not be delayed until the next Ordinary Meeting of Council for the following reason:

 

The NSW Local Government Conference is being held on 23 November 2020 which is prior to the November Council meeting.

 

The Mayoral Direction is attached to the report. Also attached is the email received by the Acting CEO from LGNSW in relation to this matter.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.

Support the delivery of a range of transport options.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Act as an environmental leader in the community.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Actively advocate for federal and state government support, funding and services.

Legislative

Section 226(d) of the Local Government Act 1993.

Risk

The risk is deemed to be low and is considered within Council’s risk appetite.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Mayoral Direction dated 5 November 2020

2.         Email from LGNSW to the Acting CEO


1

CORP 06

Mayoral Direction pursuant to Section 226(d) of the Local Government Act 1993

Attachment 1

Mayoral Direction dated 5 November 2020

 

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1

CORP 06

Mayoral Direction pursuant to Section 226(d) of the Local Government Act 1993

Attachment 2

Email from LGNSW to the Acting CEO

 

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1

Ordinary Meeting

25 November 2020

City Infrastructure and Environment Report

 

INF 01

Revision and Update of the Environment Advisory Committee Charter

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Encourage community participation in decision-making

File Ref

283016.2020

Report By

Michael Zengovski - Manager City Environment

Approved By

Raj Autar - Director City Infrastructure and Environment

 

 

Executive Summary

 

The Environment Advisory Committee (EAC) was established by Liverpool City Council in 2012 to consider environmental issues and provide input into Council’s environmental programs. In December 2016, Council resolved to dissolve the Floodplain Management Committee with its functions absorbed by the EAC.

 

The current two-year membership term of the EAC expires in December 2020. A review of the current Charter (version 7, 21 November 2018) has been undertaken before calling for expressions of interest for new membership.

 

This report seeks Council’s endorsement to the proposed changes made to the Charter and to seek expressions of interest for the next term of EAC membership. The changes involve correction of typographical errors, clarification around the scope of the Committee and clarifying the role of Councillors and staff in the EAC.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Endorses the minor amendments to the Environment Advisory Committee Charter; and

 

2.    Calls for expressions of interest for the next term of the Environment Advisory Committee membership.

 

 

 

 

 

REPORT

 

Background

 

The EAC Charter was last reviewed at the end of the previous term of membership, in November 2018.  The amended Charter was adopted at the 21 November 2018 ordinary Council Meeting in conjunction with the appointment of the current term’s EAC membership.

 

The EAC consists of Councillors, community members, industry representatives and the local Land Councils.

 

The purpose of the EAC is to provide an opportunity for community participation in decision making on environmental matters, including floodplain and water management.

 

Charter Review

 

A review of the Charter commenced in July 2020, to clarify the functions of the committee, address outstanding changes, correct errors with version numbering, and apply consistent formatting.

 

At the 17 August 2020 meeting of the EAC, the proposed changes were tabled for the EAC members to provide their comments on the Charter.

 

The EAC sought clarification regarding the full scope of environmental issues addressed by the Committee and recommended inclusion of references to waste and sustainability as specific environmental issues.

 

The EAC valued a diversity of opinion amongst its membership. As such, the EAC recommended that a reduction in membership numbers was not desirable.

 

Committee members were provided a copy of the revised Charter on 23 September 2020 for their review and comment. Feedback has been received and incorporated into the amended Charter.

 

Proposed Changes to the Charter

 

The key proposed changes to the Charter are:

 

General

·     Language of the Charter has been updated to align with the statutory functions of Council Committees.

·     Version history has been corrected to address discrepancy introduced in the November 2018 version.

·     Typographic errors have been addressed.

 

Scope

·     Under the ‘Functions’ and ‘Outcomes’, the broader ‘environmental' discipline has been broken down to include specific reference to ‘sustainability’ and ‘waste’.

 

Membership

·     Council officers have been removed from the membership table and their role in Committee meetings has been clarified under ‘Support Staff’.

·     Language regarding the appointment of Councillors to the Committee and their function as Chairperson has been updated.

 

Conclusion

 

The attached EAC Charter improves clarity in the scope and functions of the Committee. This will provide prospective members a better understanding of how they may contribute to addressing environmental issues in the Liverpool LGA.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.


Social

Support community organisations, groups and volunteers to deliver coordinated services to the community.


Civic Leadership

Act as an environmental leader in the community.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         DRAFT Environment Advisory Committee Charter


1

INF 01

Revision and Update of the Environment Advisory Committee Charter

Attachment 1

DRAFT Environment Advisory Committee Charter

 

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1

Ordinary Meeting

25 November 2020

City Infrastructure and Environment Report

 

INF 02

Management of Contaminated Lands

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Develop, and advocate for, plans that support safe and friendly communities

File Ref

292432.2020

Report By

Michael Zengovski - Manager City Environment

Approved By

Raj Autar - Director City Infrastructure and Environment

 

 

Executive Summary

 

This report provides an update on the various remediation works and associated activities that are currently underway to manage a range of contamination issues affecting Council owned lands, predominantly comprising asbestos contamination.

 

Council’s task of managing its contaminated lands effectively and safely continues to intensify, mainly due to the nature and extent of contamination affecting Council owned lands, which includes:

·     asbestos containing materials either from legacy insitu asbestos or illegal waste dumping;

·     contaminated solid waste, contaminated groundwater, heavy metals and hydrocarbons arising from former landfills;

·     hydrocarbons arising from a former gas works site; and

·     PFAS (per- and poly-fluorinated alkyl substances) ground contamination arising from historic use of firefighting foams.

 

Council has a substantial portfolio of open space and community facilities that may be impacted by some form of contamination, and while it is impossible to know the condition of all sites, Council’s Asbestos and Waste Management System (AWMS) provides a systematic process for the identification, investigation and remediation of contaminated sites to ensure they continue to remain fit for their intended purpose.

 

Best practice asbestos and contaminated waste management is now a key function of Council, with a clear management structure and corresponding budget to enable delivery of identified remediation works. Ongoing improvements are also being made to continue to build technical capacity in this important area of Council’s operation.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

 

REPORT

 

1.   Background

 

Council conducted an Environmental Waste Audit in 2015 to review and improve its practices in the management of asbestos, and construction and demolition waste generated from its ongoing activities. The findings of this Audit became the impetus for a range of vital changes to the management of Council’s contaminated lands. One of the most significant outcomes of the Audit was the development of Council’s own Asbestos and Waste Management System. Council continues to make significant progress in its management of contamination issues affecting council owned lands. This report provides an update on management of contaminated lands.

 

2.   Management of Council’s contaminated lands

 

Council has identified 158 sites across the LGA that have been impacted by a range of contamination from illegal dumping to insitu contamination from various sources. Of these 158 sites, 66 sites do not require further work or monitoring following site inspections and removal of contamination. The remaining 92 sites are impacted by contamination from asbestos containing materials, glass containing envirosoils used for top dressing, legacy waste from former gasworks, landfill related contamination and PFAS and require ongoing investigations and/or remediation. The following provides a summary of progress to date on these sites with details presented later in this report.

 

Nature of contamination:

·     81 sites have been found to contain asbestos containing materials, mostly within the subsurface soils, however with some surface contamination as well. 

·     3 sites are impacted by a range of contamination relating to the historic use of these sites as landfills.

·     4 sites have PFAS contamination due to previous uses for firefighting training purposes by RFS.

·     3 sites had Envirosoils applied for landscaping purposes, which were later found to contain glass. These sites have now been remediated.

·     1 site in Liverpool housed a gas manufacturing plant, known as gasworks, which was used to produce town gas for heating, lighting and cooking. The operation of gasworks has left a legacy of soil and groundwater contamination. The main contaminants include tars, oils and hydrocarbon sludges. While many of these materials were recycled or reused, some remain buried at the gasworks site.

Status of investigation and remediation works:

·     57 sites - preliminary visual inspections completed and detailed subsurface investigations will be undertaken progressively over the next 3-5 years.

·     12 sites - necessary investigations have been completed and a range of remediation works will be programmed over the next 2 years.

·     5 sites - are currently being remediated. Examples include BMX Tracks at Powell Park, and McGirr Park.

·     9 sites - have been remediated and will be managed in accordance with site specific Environmental Management Plans to ensure ongoing integrity of the remediation works.

·     9 sites - have been investigated and fully remediated.

 

3.   PFAS contamination

 

As part of due diligence undertaken by the Rural Fire Service (RFS) on sites they have occupied in the LGA for operational purposes, they identified several Council owned sites where historically PFAS containing firefighting foams were used for fire training/operations. PFAS is an acronym for per- and poly-fluorinated alkyl substances.  These are manufactured

chemicals that have been used for more than 50 years to make a range of products. Foam containing PFAS has been used in firefighting activities, such as fuel type fires and training by some Rural Fire Brigades since 1975 for the protection of people and property. 

 

The release of PFAS into the environment is an emerging concern because these chemicals are highly persistent, have been shown to be toxic to fish and some animals, and can accumulate in the bodies of fish, animals and people who come into contact with them. However, there is currently no consistent evidence that exposure to PFAS causes adverse human health effects.

 

The RFS, NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) and Council are working to investigate the presence of PFAS at Council owned former RFS training facilities and fire stations across the LGA.  There are currently four former RFS sites known to be contaminated with PFAS and subject to ongoing investigations and remediation, these are:

·     Western Depot, 245 Devonshire Road, Kemps Creek former RFS training facility.

·     1662 Elizabeth Drive, Kemps Creek former RFS training facility.

·     59 Ninth Avenue, Austral former fire brigade station.

·     8-10 First Avenue, Hoxton Park former fire brigade station.

 

The Department of Defence (Defence) is also investigating Council owned land near Holsworthy Barracks and the Liverpool Fire Station (former Defence fire station, owned by

Fire and Rescue NSW) located on Anzac Road, Moorebank to determine the nature and extent of PFAS.  These investigations are due to start in late November 2020.

 

The current status of investigations and remediation planning at these sites are summarised below in Section 7.

 

4.   Management of Council’s buildings with asbestos

 

Council has care and control of numerous buildings and facilities that were built around the middle to late twentieth century when asbestos containing materials were considered a viable choice for construction. Consequently, parts of Council’s building portfolio have asbestos containing materials in areas such as electrical switchboards, eaves and ceilings.

 

In accordance with SafeWork NSW requirements for ongoing monitoring of asbestos containing buildings and facilities, Council undertook a comprehensive review and inspection of all its buildings in 2018 and subsequently updated all asbestos registers.

 

Further, Council continues to undertake asbestos remediation works in buildings when required.  Since May 2020, Council has completed asbestos remediation work in four of its buildings, ranging from kiosks in parks to a storeroom at the Rose Street depot.  In all cases, asbestos containing materials were removed and managed in accordance with relevant procedures.

 

5.   Asbestos and Waste Management System (AWMS)

 

The magnitude, complexity and the importance of appropriately managing contamination risks requires a systematic and a whole-of-council approach. Council’s overarching Asbestos and Waste Management System together with the underlying guidelines and procedures provides that structured framework. These guidelines are continually being reviewed and updated to ensure it is current and relevant to Council’s operations. Detailed procedures are also being developed to better guide building, grounds maintenance and waste handling areas, which are anticipated to be completed by December 2020.

 

Further, an Asbestos Working Group (AWG) has been formed to facilitate improved levels of awareness and communication between the various areas of Council involved in managing asbestos and construction waste. The AWG, comprising members from Work Health and Safety, City Presentation and Infrastructure Directorates, has proven effective in strengthening the oversight of asbestos and contaminated waste management across Council with improved communication and collaboration between key areas and departments of Council.

 

6.   Waste Tracking System

 

Council continues to ensure that illegally dumped waste as well as waste arising from Council’s own construction operations are appropriately tracked, waste classified as per NSW EPA requirements and transported to a facility licensed to receive the waste. 

 

The following table presents an update of illegally dumped asbestos waste removed and disposed with its corresponding costs since November 2018.

 

Period

Volume

(tonnes)

Total disposal cost

Amount recovered from EPA

Nov - Dec 2018

301

$134,107

Nil

2019

1,575

$691,409

$35,150

2020

438

$192,401

Nil

 

The low recovery from the EPA is due to stringent requirements the EPA has in place regarding making claims.  Claims can only be made if the illegally dumped asbestos is regarded as high risk i.e. friable or dumped in a sensitive area.  Council’s illegally dumped asbestos waste typically consists of bonded asbestos and does not meet the EPA’s requirements for cost recovery. 

 

As shown above, there has been a general decline in the volume of illegally dumped asbestos waste. Although still in its early days, it is considered that increased surveillance by Council and the numerous initiatives by the NSW Government may be having a favorable impact. The removal of the levy on asbestos waste weighing up to quarter of a tonne (250 kg), and the doubling of penalties to $2 million for corporations and $500,000 for individuals caught dumping illegally are considered likely drivers for the decline in illegal dumping of asbestos waste.

 

7.  Key highlights and achievements 

 

Council’s efforts in the area of asbestos management recently received major recognition when Liverpool Council won the 2020 LGNSW Excellence in Environment Awards in Asbestos Management. The collaborative efforts of the Asbestos Working Group were cited as a factor in receiving this recognition. The LGNSW has shared Council’s AWG initiative with the EPA and Public Works Advisory as a great example of communication and education.

 

Further, Council’s Asbestos and Contaminated Waste Management framework was audited in September 2020 in accordance with LCC’s Strategic and Annual Internal Audit Plan 2019 to 2022.  The audit report highlighted a number of positive findings and acknowledged that Council has established an appropriate and fit for purpose framework for managing key risks involved with asbestos and contaminated waste.

In accordance with the AWMS, Council is currently rolling out asbestos awareness training to all departments.  Since May 2020, 58 training sessions have been provided to 192 staff.  Asbestos awareness training sessions will also be provided for new staff, where required.

 

8.   Status of major investigation and remediation works

 

The following table provides the current status of Council’s major investigation and remediation projects.

 

Site name and location

Type of contamination

Status of investigation/remediation works

PFAS Contaminated sites (in conjunction with RFS)

1. Western Depot,

245 Devonshire Rd, Kemps Creek

PFAS in soil and stormwater

·  All investigation works have been completed and a remediation action plan has been prepared. 

·  Council is working with the RFS on remediation planning.

·  The existing concrete stormwater drainage system is to be removed and replaced.  The design for the new stormwater drainage will be completed by late Dec.  Construction of the new stormwater system will be completed by June 2021.

·  Approximately 7 tonnes of soil and 700 tonnes of concrete will require removal and offsite disposal to a licensed landfill.

·  Up to approximately 135,000 litres of dam water, 400 tonnes of sediment from the dam and 3000 tonnes of soil in the adjoining property at 95 Lee and Clark Road and drainage lines will require removal and disposal to a licensed facility.

·  Remediation works are estimated to cost $400,000.

·  Anticipated remediation completion date: September 2021. 

2. 59 Ninth Avenue, Austral

PFAS in soil, stormwater and groundwater

·  Preliminary investigations have been completed at the site and within Austral Public School grounds located to the north.

·  PFAS was detected at the site in soil and groundwater and within Austral Public School grounds adjacent to the site.

·  Additional investigations will be undertaken by December 2020 to determine the extent of PFAS contamination in the school adjacent to the site.

·  Remediation cost estimates will be determined following completion of the additional investigations and preparation of a remediation action plan.

3. 8-10 First Avenue, Hoxton Park

PFAS in soil

·  All investigations have been completed.

·  A remediation action plan has been prepared.  Remediation planning is currently underway.

·  Remediation will require excavation and offsite disposal to a licensed landfill of approximately 1800 tonnes of soil from the site and approximately 115 tonnes of soil from the neighbouring residential property located at 12 First Avenue.

·  Remediation works are estimated to cost $450,000.

·  Anticipated remediation completion date: June 2021.

4. Holsworthy Barracks and Liverpool Fire Station

Potential PFAS in soil and groundwater

·  Defence has requested permission to access Council property near Liverpool Fire Station to install groundwater monitoring wells to investigate the nature and extent of PFAS in the environment.

·  The Defence investigations on Council land will start in late November 2020.

5. 1662 Elizabeth Drive, Kemps Creek

PFAS in soil and groundwater

·  Detailed site investigations were completed in September 2020.  PFAS contamination was identified in shallow soils at the site up to 300 mm depth. 

·  A remediation action plan will be prepared, this will include removal and disposal of soil up to a depth of 300 mm to a licensed landfill, removal and replacement of the concrete driveway.  The estimated volume of soil to be excavated and disposed is 1100 tonnes.

·  Remediation works are estimated to cost $350,000

·  Anticipated remediation completion date: Dec 2021.

Former landfills

6. Helles Park, Helles Avenue, Moorebank

 

 

Former landfill -asbestos in soil, landfill gas, hydrocarbons and heavy metals in groundwater

·  Soil investigations have been completed with significant contamination from former landfill identified, including putrescible waste.

·  Landfill gas monitoring continuing.

·  Investigation report and remediation action plan preparation is underway.

7. Lighthorse Park, Liverpool

 

Former landfill - asbestos in soil, landfill gas, hydrocarbons and heavy metals in groundwater.

·  Preliminary investigations have been completed. 

·  Additional soil and groundwater investigations completed in October 2020.

·  Investigation report and remediation action plan preparation is underway.

·  Required remediation works will be undertaken in conjunction with Lighthorse Park redevelopment works.

8.   Angle Park, Chipping Norton

 

Former landfill - asbestos in soil.

·  Additional investigations have been completed with significant asbestos contamination from the former landfill identified.

·  During the historical sand mining operations and subsequent backfilling, the land was owned by the Public Works Department.  Following completion of sand mining operations, backfilling and restoration of the site surface into a park, the ownership of the land was transferred to LCC (around the early 1990s).

·  Asbestos contamination has been found to be confined to the park, and additional testing has confirmed that contamination does not extend to the adjacent streets.  The impacted area is 36,500 m2.

·  Remediation works are estimated to cost $500,000.

·  Anticipated remediation completion date: June 2022. 

Other sites

9.   BMX Tracks, Powell Park, Cartwright

 

 

Asbestos in imported soil.

·  Remediation works commenced in October 2020.

·  Site has been cleared and construction of the retaining wall has started to allow onsite encapsulation of contaminated materials.

·  Remediation works are estimated to cost $990,000 (excluding historical costs).

·  Anticipated remediation completion date: Dec 2020.

10. Former gas works site, 68 Speed Street

 

 

Hydrocarbon compounds in soil and groundwater

·  The site was notified to the NSW EPA in Feb 2019 under Section 60 of the Contaminated Land Management Act 1997.

·  Site has been capped and is now an at-grade car park.

·  Offsite soil and groundwater investigations continuing. 

·  Long term groundwater monitoring up to 5 years will likely be required.

 

9.   Remediation expenditures

 

Activity

Annual Expenditure

Total

$000

2015/16

$000

2016/17

$000

2017/18

$000

2018/19

$000

2019/20

$000

2020/21

$000

1. Investigation and remediation of contaminated lands

$6,536

$2,591

$3,741

$950

$2,924

$631

$17,373

2. Asbestos Registers and Management Plan

-

-

-

$72

$162

$45

$279

3. Illegal dumping

$4

$692

$1,201

$738

$806

$62

$3,503

4. Asbestos and Waste Management System

$195

$245

$183

$15

$52

$3

$693

Total

$6,735

$3,528

$5,125

$1,775

$3,944

$741

$21,848

 

As can be seen, the highest expenditure continues to be costs incurred on remediating contaminated sites and removal and disposal of illegally dumped asbestos waste. This level of expenditure is anticipated to continue until all the major contaminated sites identified in Section 8 above have been remediated. The total budget provision for the current program year is $5.3M.

 

10.   Conclusion

 

Council continues to manage its asbestos task effectively, with Council’s Asbestos and Waste Management System providing the necessary framework to drive required change management processes.  While the full extent of the asbestos task is unable to be quantified, Council’s systems and proce