COUNCIL AGENDA

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

25 August 2021

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You are hereby notified that an Ordinary Council Meeting of Liverpool City Council will be held Online on Wednesday, 25 August 2021 commencing at 6.00pm.

 

Liverpool City Council Meetings are livestreamed onto Council’s website and remain on Council’s website for a period of 12 months.  If you have any enquiries, please contact Council and Executive Services on 8711 7584.

A close up of a logo

Description automatically generated

Dr Eddie Jackson

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

 

 


 

 

 


Order of Business

 

                                                                                                              PAGE     TAB

Opening

Acknowledgment of Country and Prayer

National Anthem

Apologies

Condolences

Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council Meeting held on 28 July 2021...................................................................... 2

Declarations of Interest

Public Forum

Mayoral Report

NIL

Notices of Motion Of Rescission

NIL

Chief Executive Officer Report

NIL

Planning & Compliance Report

PLAN 01         Draft Amendment to Liverpool Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan  2 1

PLAN 02         Post exhibition report - Amended Middleton Grange Town Centre Planning Proposal (To be included in the Addendum Booklet.)

Community & Culture Report

COM 01          Community Gardens Options Paper................................................................ 2......... 2

COM 02          Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship............................................... 2......... 3

COM 03          Report back to Council - Racism Not Welcome campaign.............................. 2......... 4

Corporate Services Report

CORP 01        Investment Report July 2021............................................................................ 2......... 5

CORP 02        Biannual Progress Report - June 2021............................................................ 2......... 6

CORP 03        Alteration to Council Meeting dates for remainder of 2021.............................. 2......... 7

CORP 04        Amendment to Council's Investment Policy..................................................... 2......... 8

CORP 05        Postponement of Council Elections, Deputy Mayor and Council Committees 2......... 9

City Presentation Report

NIL

Infrastructure & Environment Report

INF 01             2020-21 Capital Works Carryover of Projects.................................................. 2....... 10

INF 02             Impact of COVID on current contracts............................................................. 2....... 11

INF 03             Monitoring and Managing Sustainability Outcomes......................................... 2....... 12

Economy & Commercial Development Report

ECD 01           Rent Relief for Liverpool City Council Tenants (To be included in the Addendum Booklet.)

Committee Reports

CTTE 01         Minutes of the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held on 24 May 2021.. 2....... 13

CTTE 02         Minutes of the Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee meeting held on 21 July 2021........................................................................... 2....... 14

CTTE 03         Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee meeting held on 3 August 2021..... 2....... 15

Questions with Notice

QWN 01          Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Provision of “Off the Leash Dog Parks” throughout the Liverpool LGA........................................................................... 2....... 16

QWN 02          Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Council submission on Moorebank Intermodal State Significant Development......................................................................... 2....... 17

QWN 03          Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Legal Reports and Records................... 2....... 18

QWN 04          Question with Notice - Clr Harle - Shopping Trolleys, Parkbridge Estate Road Extension, Solar Energy, and Staff Changes................................................... 2....... 19

QWN 05          Question with Notice - Clr Harle - Covid and English Language Courses...... 2....... 20

QWN 06          Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Retail Hierarchy..................................... 2....... 21

Presentations by Councillors

 

Notices of Motion

NOM 01          Liverpool Animal Shelter - Animal Return Policy for previously rehomed animals       2 22

NOM 02          Liverpool Animal Shelter Social Media Animal Rehoming Service.................. 2....... 23

NOM 03          Pedestrian Bridge from Casula Railway Station to Moorebank Intermodal..... 2....... 24

NOM 04          COVID Restrictions in Western Sydney........................................................... 2....... 25

NOM 05          Naming of Western Sydney Aerotropolis......................................................... 2....... 26

NOM 06          Rates................................................................................................................. 2....... 27

Council in Closed Session

The following items are listed for consideration by Council in Closed Session with the public excluded, in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 1993 as listed below:

 

CONF 01    Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Liverpool Animal Shelter

Reason:     Item CONF 01 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(c) of the Local Government Act because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

CONF 02    Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Land adjoining Kokoda Oval, Hammondville

Reason:     Item CONF 02 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(d ii) of the Local Government Act because it contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council.

 

CONF 03    Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Basin 6, Austral

Reason:     Item CONF 03 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(c) of the Local Government Act because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

CONF 04    Update on Shepherd Street Planning Agreement

Reason:     Item CONF 04 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(g) of the Local Government Act because it contains advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

 

CONF 05    Order of Liverpool Awards 2021

Reason:     Item CONF 05 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(a) of the Local Government Act because it contains personal matters concerning particular individuals (other than councillors).

 

CONF 06    Management of Contaminated Lands

Reason:     Item CONF 06 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(g) of the Local Government Act because it contains advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

 

CONF 07    Legal advice on the public release of documents relating to Intermodal

Reason:     Item CONF 07 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(g) of the Local Government Act because it contains advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

 

CONF 08    Tender for Supply of Electricity - Renewable Energy Percentage Election

Reason:     Item CONF 08 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(d i) of the Local Government Act because it contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.  

Close


 

 

 

MINUTES OF THE Ordinary Meeting

HELD ON 28 July 2021

 

 

PRESENT:

Mayor Wendy Waller

Councillor Ayyad

Councillor Balloot

Councillor Hadchiti

Councillor Hadid

Councillor Hagarty

Councillor Harle

Councillor Kaliyanda

Councillor Karnib

Councillor Rhodes

Councillor Shelton

Dr Eddie Jackson, Chief Executive Officer

Mr George Hampouris, Acting Director Corporate Services

Ms Tina Bono, Acting Director Community and Culture

Mr David Smith, Acting Director Planning and Compliance

Mr Peter Diplas, Acting Director City Presentation

Mr Raj Autar, Director Infrastructure and Environment

Mr John Morgan, Director Economy and Commercial Development

Ms Jennifer Chenhall, General Counsel, Manager Governance, Legal and Procurement

Mr John Milicic, Manager Property Services

Mr Vishwa Nadan, Chief Financial Officer

Ms Ellen Whittingstall, Acting Internal Ombudsman

Mr George Georgakis, Manager Council and Executive Services

Ms Rose Koch, Committee Officer (Minutes)

 

The meeting commenced at 6.00pm.

 

 

STATEMENT REGARDING WEBCASTING OF MEETING

The Mayor reminded everyone that in accordance with Council’s Code of Meeting Practice, the meeting is being livestreamed.

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF COUNTRY, PRAYER OF COUNCIL AND AFFIRMATION TO BE READ BY

 

The prayer of the Council was read by Mr Eddie Jackson, Chief Executive Officer.

 

APOLOGIES

 

Nil.

CONDOLENCES

 

Nil.

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton                        Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting held on 30 June 2021 be confirmed as a true record of that meeting.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Clr Hadid declared a non-pecuniary, less than significant interest in the following item:

 

CONF 06:       Consideration of an application for the acquisition of land on the grounds of hardship – 46 Body Street, Austral identified as Lot 122 in DP 738282.

 

Reason:         Clr Hadid is a friend of the owner of the property.

 

Clr Hadid left the virtual meeting for the duration of this item.

 

 

Clr Kaliyanda declared a non-pecuniary, less than significant interest in the following item:

 

COM 01:         Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship

 

Reason:         Clr Kaliyanda knows several of the organisations that are listed in the report through her work in the community. 

 

Clr Kaliyanda left the virtual meeting for the duration of this item.

 

 

Clr Hagarty declared a non-pecuniary, less than significant interest in the following item:

 

COM 01:         Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship

 

Reason:         Clr Hagarty knows several of the organisations that are listed in the report through his work in the community. 

 

Clr Hagarty left the virtual meeting for the duration of this item.

 

 

Clr Hadchiti declared a non-pecuniary, less than significant interest in the following item:

 

CONF 01:       Tender WT3013 – Construction of stormwater basin 6 in Austral

 

Reason:         Clr Hadchiti lives in the area.

 

Clr Hadchiti remained in the meeting for the duration of this item.

 

 

Clr Rhodes declared a non-pecuniary, less than significant interest in the following item:

 

COM 01:         Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship

 

Reason:         Clr Rhodes knows organisations that are listed in the report through her work in the community. 

 

Clr Rhodes remained in the meeting for the duration of this item.

 

 

Clr Hadchiti declared a pecuniary interest in the following item:

 

MAYOR 01:    Environmental Planning and Assessment Amendment (Compliance Fees) Regulation 2021

 

Clr Hadchiti left the virtual meeting for this item.

 

Public Forum

Presentation – items not on agenda

 

Nil.

Representation – items on agenda

 

Nil.

 


 

Clr Hadchiti declared a pecuniary interest in MAYOR 01 and left the virtual meeting at 6.08pm.

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

ITEM NO:       MAYOR 01

FILE NO:        245497.2021

SUBJECT:     Environmental Planning and Assessment Amendment (Compliance Fees) Regulation 2021

 

On Friday 16 July 2021, Council was notified by the Chief Executive of LGNSW of the passage by the NSW State Government of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Amendment (Compliance Fees) Regulation 2021 (NSW). Liverpool City Council is one of 29 councils in NSW which charges compliance levies to support council development and compliance activities.

 

Earlier this year, while Council was finalising its 2021/2022 budget, the Government announced it intended to prohibit the ability of councils to charge a compliance levy from 1 July 2021. Following strong advocacy from LGNSW and councils, the Government announced it would defer this imposition on councils so it could consult with the sector and introduce a new compliance funding regime.

 

Regrettably, in the absence of any consultation and despite ongoing advocacy by LGNSW, the Environmental Planning and Assessment Amendment (Compliance Fees) Regulation 2021 was published on Friday 16 July 2021 with the effect of prohibiting councils from collecting compliance levies. For those councils that currently collect compliance levies, this prohibition now takes effect from 31 December 2021.

 

This regulation was made in the same month the Government saw the passage of new legislation which facilitates 'compliance levies' for the NSW Building Commissioner's Office. Councils will be required to collect the new compliance levies for the Building Commissioner's Office and remit the funds but won’t be able to collect compliance levies to fund their own development and compliance activities.

 

LGNSW considers this an outrageous impost on councils. LGNSW will be strongly responding to the Government's action and has requested our Council’s assistance by providing information about the financial impacts of this change.

 

For Liverpool City Council, the compliance levy has raised, on average, $3 million per year (since the levy was introduced in FY 2015/16). This Council has previously resolved that all revenue from the levy be used to fund council development and compliance activities. Removing the ability for councils to collect a compliance levy will result in at least a $3 million shortfall in Council’s operational budget position in future years (potentially more depending on the level of development activity in the LGA) and will significantly affect our capacity to deliver the level of compliance activities expected by the community.

 

For high growth Councils like Liverpool, the Compliance Levy is an opportunity to ensure adequate oversight and resourcing of our regulatory responsibilities. Coming on top of changes to the contributions planning framework, the removal of the compliance levy is yet another cut to local government funding without any reduction in demand.

 

The State Government should reverse this decision or implement, at least, a 2-year moratorium on the removal of the levy for high growth Councils like Liverpool to enable a transition to any new scheme. This would enable a transition to alternative budget arrangements for future financial years without impacting so significantly on service delivery over the short term.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Mayor Waller 

 

That Council write to the Hon Rob Stokes, Minister for Planning and Public Spaces requesting the Government reverse the decision to prohibit council from collecting compliance levies from 31 December 2021, or in the alternative, for the State Government to implement (at least) a 2 year moratorium on the removal of the levy for high growth Councils like Liverpool to enable a transition to any new scheme.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

Clr Ayyad voted asked that she be recorded as having voted against the above motion.

 

 


ITEM NO:       MAYOR 02

FILE NO:        245450.2021

SUBJECT: 2021 COVID-19 Lockdown ITEM NO: MAYOR 02

 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Liverpudlians for staying home and doing the right thing. We are living through very unusual and challenging times.

 

While virus case numbers across Greater Sydney are concerning, Liverpool’s numbers remain lower compared to other named Local Government Areas.

 

Due to the pandemic the local government elections have been postponed until 4 December 2021.

 

Like everyone in our community I’m in lockdown with my immediate family members including children and can very much relate to the challenges of home schooling and working life. It’s not easy and we are all doing it tough

 

We are a resilient community and when faced with adversity we stand together. 

 

If you are at home and experiencing distress, please reach out via phone or use technology to reach out to someone you trust. Support is available through the Beyond Blue Helpline, Lifeline, the National Sexual Assault, Domestic Family Violence Counselling

Service and the National Debt Hotline.

 

This pandemic is serious because the virus has mutated and this time people of all ages in our community are vulnerable and it’s extremely contagious. As a parent and grandparent, automatically you wish to protect those most vulnerable in your family. I would like to stress that health guidelines are provided regarding care for family members not of your household - please follow these instructions.

 

The Minister for Health and Medical Research, Brad Hazzard has explained recently that a number of community infections had occurred due to families intermingling to pay their respects after a death in the family.

 

This would indeed be a very sad time with plenty of rituals and traditions involved, but it is crucial that you do not visit other households during this time. My own cousin recently passed away and sadly I cannot attend the household nor attend the funeral. We will use technology and yes, we were close.

 

I have lobbied for more vaccination centres in Liverpool and there has been some success. From 2 August, pop-up mobile vaccination centres will be set up in nominated suburbs in our community.

 

It is important that you get tested if you are unwell.

 

Currently, the Whitlam Centre is offering a 24-hour testing service.

 

Getting Australians vaccinated is important now more than ever and we’re proud to be doing our bit to help bolster the vaccine roll-out in South West Sydney which is the only way to safeguard the community against COVID-19.

 

We saw the eradication of polio and tetanus through vaccinations and we hope to see the same result during this pandemic. Consult your GP if you are in need.

 

We really need to think of the safety of each other. Don’t take risks, don’t ignore health directives. Stay home, get tested and get vaccinated if you can.

 

The wellbeing of our residents seriously weighs heavily on my mind and my fellow Councillors’ minds - this is a pandemic, a national emergency and it’s serious.

 

To get the numbers down we will need to stick to the necessary but sometimes restrictive health directives.

 

Please stay home and stay safe, so we all stay safe.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Mayor Waller 

 

That Council note the report.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 


 

 

Chief Executive Officer Report

ITEM NO:       CEO 01

FILE NO:        222812.2021

SUBJECT:     Annual Report to Council by the Internal Ombudsman

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That Council receive and note the annual report presented by the Internal Ombudsman.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Planning & Compliance Report

 

ITEM NO:       PLAN 01

FILE NO:        174998.2021

SUBJECT:     Planning Proposal to amend the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 to realign Liverpool Hospital's Helicopter Flight Paths

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

1.    Notes the advice of the Liverpool Local Planning Panel;

 

2.    Endorses the planning proposal to amend the relevant Key Site Maps in the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 relating to hospital helicopter airspace in accordance with the updated helicopter flight paths;

 

3.    Delegates to the CEO to make any typographical or other editing amendments to the planning proposal if required;

 

4.    Forwards the planning proposal to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment pursuant to Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, seeking a Gateway determination, with a request that Council be authorised as the local plan making authority;

 

5.    Subject to Gateway determination, undertake public exhibition and community consultation in accordance with the conditions of the Gateway determination and the Liverpool Community Participation Plan; and

 

6.    Receive a further report on the outcomes of public exhibition and community consultation.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       PLAN 02

FILE NO:        195713.2021

SUBJECT:     Post-exhibition report - Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 Amendment 79 - rezoning land and amending development standards at 4-8 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Harle                  Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council:

 

1.    Notes the Gateway determination for Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Amendment 79) and the results of the public authority consultation and community consultation; and

 

2.    Subject to the execution of the planning agreement, proceeds with Amendment 79 to the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008 and delegates authority to the CEO (or his delegate) to liaise with the Parliamentary Counsel’s Office and the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment to finalise the amendment.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Vote for:         Mayor Waller, Clr Ayyad, Clr Balloot, Clr Hadchiti, Clr Hadid, Clr Hagarty, Clr Harle, Clr Kaliyanda, Clr Karnib and Clr Rhodes.

 

Vote against: Clr Shelton.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       PLAN 03

FILE NO:        201856.2021

SUBJECT:     Issues and Options Report - Permitting Dual Occupancies in the R2 and R3 zones of the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receive and note this report; and

 

2.    Investigates including ‘Dual Occupancies’ as a land use permitted with development consent in the R2 Low Density Residential and R3 Medium Density Residential zones of the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan as part of Phase 2 of the LEP Review.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Vote for:         Mayor Waller, Clr Ayyad, Clr Balloot, Clr Hadchiti, Clr Hadid, Clr Hagarty, Clr Harle, Clr Kaliyanda, Clr Karnib and Clr Shelton.

 

Vote against: Clr Rhodes

 

 

 


Clr Hagarty and Clr Kaliyanda temporarily left the meeting at 6.20pm.

 

Community & Culture Report

 

ITEM NO:       COM 01

FILE NO:        196466.2021

SUBJECT:     Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council endorses the recommendation of $28,950 (GST exclusive) under the Corporate Sponsorship Program for the following projects subject to the projects going ahead due to Covid restrictions;

 

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Friends of India Australia Incorporated

Ganeshotsava

$10,000

Southern Districts Soccer Football Association

Annual Liverpool Knockout Competition (Soccer)

$8,950

Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research

Robotics, Health Technology & Industry Symposium

$10,000

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 


Clr Hagarty and Clr Kaliyanda returned to the meeting at 6.22pm

 

ITEM NO:       COM 02

FILE NO:        198692.2021

SUBJECT:     Review of the Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship Policy

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council endorse the Grants, Donations, and Community Sponsorship Policy and place it on public exhibition for a period of 28 days.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Corporate Services Report

 

ITEM NO:       CORP 01

FILE NO:        176706.2021

SUBJECT:     Investment Report June 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       CORP 02

FILE NO:        206185.2021

SUBJECT:     Western Sydney City Deal - Participation Evaluation

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Karnib

 

That Council notes the report which provides an overview of Council’s costs and benefits associated with the Western Sydney City Deal to date.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Committee Reports

 

ITEM NO:       CTTE 01

FILE NO:        170965.2021

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council meeting held Tuesday 8 June 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Clr Hadid 

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council Meeting held on Tuesday 8 June 2021.

 

2.    Endorse the recommendations in the Minutes.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       CTTE 02

FILE NO:        191038.2021

SUBJECT:     Liverpool Sports Committee Minutes of meeting held 27 May 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the Minutes of the Liverpool Sports Committee meeting held on 27 May 2021.

 

2.    Endorse the recommendation in the minutes

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       CTTE 03

FILE NO:        200415.2021

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Companion Animals Advisory Committee meeting held on 1 June 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council receive and note the minutes of the Companion Animals Advisory Committee meeting held on 1 June 2021.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       CTTE 04

FILE NO:        201301.2021

SUBJECT:     Meeting notes of the Liverpool Access Committee meeting held on 15 April 2021 and minutes of the Liverpool Access Committee meeting held on 10 June 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the meeting notes of the Liverpool Access Committee meeting held on 15 April 2021;

 

2.    Receives and notes the minutes of the Liverpool Access Committee Meeting held on 10 June 2021; and

 

3.    Endorses the recommendations in the notes and minutes. 

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       CTTE 05

FILE NO:        214065.2021

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Tourism and CBD Committee Meeting held 29 June 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the Minutes of the Tourism and CBD Meeting held on 29 June 2021; and

 

2.    Endorse the recommendations in the Minutes.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       CTTE 06

FILE NO:        214288.2021

SUBJECT:     Minutes of Strategic Panel meeting held on 15 June 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Strategic Panel Meeting held on 15 June 2021.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       CTTE 07

FILE NO:        216781.2021

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Environment Advisory Commitee Meeting held on 15 June 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee Meeting held on 15 June 2021.

 

2.    Endorse the recommendations in the Minutes.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       CTTE 08

FILE NO:        220289.2021

SUBJECT:     Intermodal Precinct Committee 7th June 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Ayyad                Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Intermodal Precinct Committee Meeting held on 7th June 2021 and considers the following recommendations:

 

1.    That the Committee write to Woolworths to seek an ongoing scholarship program for:

a.    at least one local student from the Liverpool LGA to study an engineering or advanced technologies undergraduate program at a local university; and

b.    at least one scholarship for a local student to attend TAFE to study in an emerging field such as electrotechnology.

 

2.    Council to consider engagement with the NSW and Federal governments as well as relevant parties to retain the current Moorebank Avenue upgrade and seek alternative solutions to the realignment such as overpass bridges;

 

3.    Council consider engagement with the NSW and Federal governments as well as relevant parties to construct an eastbound M5 weave upgrade at the same time as the Moorebank Ave Interchanges and westbound weave projects are undertaken, and to place appropriate transparent noise walls in both directions, similar to those on the M7;

 

4.    Council to write to the NSW government and EPA NSW to advise that Council is no longer the authorised regulatory authority for air and noise pollution, that this role is assumed by the EPA NSW and that Council provide a list of location metrics for air and noise pollution enforcement to the Committee; and

 

5.    That Council consider engaging with NSW and Federal government to redesign the Moorebank Precinct West Masterplan to be consistent with concept approvals at 300,000 square metres of warehousing.

 

 On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


 

Questions with Notice

 

ITEM NO:       QWN 01

FILE NO:        196276.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Animal Welfare

 

Please address the following:

 

1.    What is the process from when rangers attend to a found pet?

 

2.    What is the average time between an animal being taken to the shelter and appearing on:

·      Council's website?

·      The facilities Facebook page?

 

3.    What other channels are used?

 

4.    What details are posted?

 

5.    Are there KPIs for this?

 

6.    Are Council meeting these KPIs?

 

7.    Are there KPIs in place for rehoming animals?

 

8.    Are Council meeting these KPIs?

 

9.    How much time each day are dogs given out of their kennels?

 

10.  What enrichment are they provided each day?

 

11.  What strategies are in place to prevent dogs from suffering significant kennel stress such as aggressive behaviour, barking and lunging at people?.

 

12.  What training and information do rangers and rehoming officers undertake and have access to in relation to:

·      Animal handling, enrichment and recognising body language?

·      The latest methods in animal rehoming?

·      Dangerous dog handling?

 

 

 

 

Response

 

1.    What is the process from when rangers attend to a found pet?

 

Council officers will scan the animal, and if microchipped, will contact the owner and return the animal home within 2 hours and update Council’s records. If the animal is not identified, then the animal is taken to the Liverpool Animal Shelter at Rossmore Vet.

 

Under the Companion Animals Act, a companion animal must be identified (microchipped) from 12 weeks of age and it is an offence not to do so and is subject to an on the spot fine. In addition, the Act requires a dog to wear a collar which shows the name of the dog and the address or phone number of the owner. It is also an offence for a dog not to have a collar.

 

2.    What is the average time between an animal being taken to the shelter and appearing on:

·      Council's website?

·      the facilities Facebook page?

 

Lost animals that are not identified are posted on both pages within 24 hours of entering the shelter on a Monday to Friday. If an animal enters the animal shelter on the weekend, details are posted on Monday. However, the shelter can be contacted 7 days a week for residents to enquire about lost animals or to pick up lost animals.

 

3.    What other channels are used?

 

Council monitors local lost & found Facebook pages. Where an owner has posted details regarding their lost pet, Council officers will contact them directly. Staff also circulate Lost Pet Alerts amongst the team, so officers are aware of missing animals in the area.

 

Council also keeps a log of all calls made to the shelter regarding lost pets in the Liverpool LGA and surrounding areas which is referred to when an animal is impounded, to reunite the pet and owner sooner.

 

4.    What details are posted?

 

Species, breed, gender, name (if known), suburb found, and a photo.

 

5.    Are there KPIs for this?

 

As identified above, lost animals that are not identified are posted on both pages within 24 hours of entering the shelter on a Monday to Friday. If an animal enters the animal shelter on the weekend, details are posted on Monday. However, the shelter can be contacted 7 days a week for residents to enquire about lost animals or to pick up lost animals.

 

 

 

6.    Are Council meeting these KPIs?

 

Yes.

 

7.    Are there KPIs in place for rehoming animals?

 

The Delivery Program and Operational Plan (DPOP) (C.4.06) target is 65% of dogs to be rehomed within two months and 40% of cats to be rehomed within two months.

 

8.    Are Council meeting these KPIs?

 

Council reports on how it is meeting targets in the DPOP through the biannual report. Council is currently exceeding this target. In the January to June 2021 period, 94% of dogs were rehomed and 100% of cats were rehomed within 2 months.

 

9.    How much time each day are dogs given out of their kennels?

 

Dogs are out of their kennels all day. Dogs are taken out of their night kennels and taken to their outdoor runs every morning. Dogs are also walked by staff and have one on one training and enrichment time in Council’s off-leash area.

 

10.  What enrichment are they provided each day?

 

As outlined above, dogs are taken to their outdoor runs every morning, walked by staff, have one on one time with staff, provided with toys, kongs with food / treats, and training with treats for mental stimulation.

 

11.  What strategies are in place to prevent dogs from suffering significant kennel stress such as aggressive behaviour, barking and lunging at people?

 

As outlined above, dogs are out of their kennels all day. Dogs are taken out of their night kennels and taken to their outdoor runs every morning. Dogs are also walked by staff and have one on one training and enrichment time in Council’s off-leash area. 

 

The welfare and enrichment of animals is Council’s priority. Staff spend time with each animal to build a relationship with them and gain their trust. Keeping the dogs mentally stimulated and physically active along with one on one training time helps ensure dogs are happy while at the shelter. Council officers are at the facility Monday to Friday to work with and monitor the welfare of each animal. Animals are cared for by Rossmore Vet staff on the weekends.

 

12.  What training and information do rangers and rehoming officers undertake and have access to in relation to:

 

·    animal handling, enrichment and recognising body language?

 

 

Formal training sessions have been held at the Liverpool Animal Shelter and included all shelter staff. The training was carried out by an Animal Behaviourist. There is also ongoing training on a one to one basis when a particular dog is identified that requires assessment to deal with a behavioral issue.

 

·    the latest methods in animal rehoming?

 

Council’s officers have access to online information, communication with other shelter rehoming officers and connection with rescue groups.

 

·    dangerous dog handling?

 

Dangerous dog training has been conducted for Rangers and Shelter staff by an external trainer. Ongoing training and development is available to Council staff and forms part of Council’s continuous learning and development program.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

1.      That Council staff investigate ways and means of posting animals on Council’s website, prior to Monday, if found on Friday evening or over the weekend;

 

2.      Investigate implementing an expression of interest waitlist for people interested in a particular breed of animal;

 

3.      The ongoing statistics and information detailed in this item be regularly reported to the Companion Animals Advisory Committee;

 

4.      Council investigates updates to its website in relation to animal rehoming; and

 

5.      Council investigate the ability of the public to surrender cats and different ways of rehoming cats.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       QWN 02

FILE NO:        196334.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Kaliyanda - Digitisation of Services

 

Please address the following:

 

1.    What Council services or functions have been digitised (partially or completely) as a response to the impacts of COVID-19?

 

Since the commencement of the pandemic, Council has re-prioritised some of its IT projects to better enable the way both its staff operate whilst working from home and the Community engages with Council. Some examples are the upgrade of Council’s security infrastructure which has allowed for remote working without compromising on security. Council’s full suite of corporate software has been made accessible both to corporate and personal devices. Other implementations have been the Online booking management system, the digitisation of GIPA lodgements and the expansion of virtual and hybrid meetings throughout our Community Engagement This includes the Liverpool District Forums, Council Committees and consultation methodologies.  

 

In regards to CPAC, a series of digital initiatives have been implemented and are available in the below links;

 

https://www.casulapowerhouse.com/visit/cpac-digital-program

 

https://www.casulapowerhouse.com/visit/cpac-digital-program/art-activities

 

CPAC was the first NSW Arts Centre to do so during the initial 2020 lockdown. The Digital Program is still ongoing during the 2021 lockdown period with more activities coming online each week. These include virtual tours, online film screenings, online exhibitions, artist talks, activities for kids and families, music, cooking lessons and gardening tips.

 

In the Events space, NAIDOC Week 2021 was heavily impacted by Covid restrictions and has transitioned partially to the digital realm. Some examples of video contents and activities are included in the below links.

 

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=907245306472147

 

https://www.casulapowerhouse.com/visit/naidoc-week

 

2.    Has follow up been conducted as to which of these were successful and which were not?

 

As Council continues to navigate through the challenges of the pandemic delivery of some services in alternative formats have been assessed for their effectiveness. For example, the review of Liverpool District Forums identified some challenges and opportunities when they are delivered solely online. The alternative method of hybrid is currently being investigated to allow residents’ participation in-person and or online.  Other services such as library and CPAC have been innovative in their approach to communicate information and engage service users through virtual sessions.

 

What Council has learnt though, is that large sections of the community are happy to be engaged in a virtual environment. This has in some areas increased participation due to the ease of accessibility, resolves the problem for those whom lack the transport means and enhances flexibility. Notwithstanding this, Council is acutely aware that a section of the community still prefers face to face interaction.

 

During government stay at home orders periods, Council has no option but to rely on online channels to inform and consult with the community. As the pandemic continue, for all other times outside the lockdown, in accordance to NSW Health advice and through a COVID Safe Plan, Council will adopt innovative and flexible arrangements to maximise engagement and interaction with residents.

 

Council will review the Community Engagement Plan to provide overarching framework and guidelines for diverse and flexible community engagement methods during the pandemic.

 

For CPAC, Google Analytics and Social Media metrics are analysed regularly to ensure content is being used by as many as possible. Encouragingly, total virtual visitation to the centre has at least matched and often exceeded usual attendance figures.

 

3.    If so, what factors have been identified in the successful digitisation of a service or function?

 

While Council certainly couldn’t have predicted the COVID-19 pandemic, this event has acted as a catalyst for the shift in community engagement by accelerating the speed at which local governments are adapting to meet the community’s changing needs. As a case in point, preliminary data from the online booking system shows that the community’s utilisation of the online bookings portal is increasing steadily month to month.

 

Based on the “Building stronger communities in an increasingly digital post pandemic society” report (a community focused research assessment co-published by CIVICA and UTS in May 2021), 79% of citizens expect the main interactions with their council to be through self-service technologies in the next five years. In addition, 47% of citizens agree they will primarily use social media to connect with their local council in the future. This broad appetite for digital engagement is consistent with Council’s own observation of its community and business. Council is acutely aware that there are sub-groups in the community who might miss out where digital engagement is the predominate approach and this needs to be catered for.

 

In the arts and culture space, some of the most successful digitised services have been in the film screening, virtual exhibitions/tours and kids/family areas. The latter being especially so when the online activity is paired with downloadable activity sheets/instructions for parents.

 

4.    What factors have been identified in the unsuccessful digitisation of a service or function?

 

Council recognises that there are sub-groups  in the community (seniors, people with a disability or socio-economic disadvantage groups) which lack the technological skills or equipment to connect via digital engagement. Council has also recognised that there is a large part of the community which prefers engagement of services when they are digitised.

 

Council’s Library Services and Community Development teams have existing strategies and programs that are currently being explored to provide training and assistance to the residents who lack the access to technology and/or require upskilling in the utilisation of technology. It is envisaged that the staff will host and facilitate these sessions when the state’s lockdown eases. 

 

At CPAC, music performances have been identified by the measurement mechanisms mentioned above to be the least successful digitised translation of service, so they have been discontinued in response. This has probably been as a result of the increased volume of digitised concert experiences made available to people during the pandemic from across Australia and around the world.

 

5.    Please outline what aspects of Council’s functions or services have explored, or are currently exploring, digital transformation to improve resident experience, effectiveness or efficiency.

 

Council has been working on a digital transformation strategy which will position Council to future proof itself as a “connected Council”. In other words, digitising its community, service and back office functions in a seamless and integrated way to both improve organisational efficiency, community engagement and the overall customer experience. This will also form the foundation to leverage off the technological future which includes Smart Cities, open data, IoT and 5G. This is expected to be presented to Council later in the calendar year.

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       QWN 03

FILE NO:        234116.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Provision of “Off the Leash Dog Parks” throughout the Liverpool LGA

 

Can Council explain what process does Liverpool Council use when determining:

 

a)    Where “off the leash dog parks” are situated throughout the Liverpool LGA?

 

b)    How many “off the leash Dog Parks” should be provided in Liverpool LGA?

 

A response to these Questions with Notice will be provided in the 25 August 2021 Council Meeting Business Papers.

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       QWN 04

FILE NO:        234120.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Council submission on Moorebank Intermodal State Significant Development

 

Can Council answer the following:

 

1.    Did Liverpool Council submit an objection to NSW Government Planning – Major Projects – Project 271156 submissions – 13111 – 3251

 

2.    Can Council confirm if they received a Notice of Determination of Application Moorebank Intermodal Precinct West - Stage 3 (SSD-10431), from the Department of Planning Industry and Environment that they would have received on or around 18 June 2021, like the other Objectors within our community?

 

3.    Can Council provide a copy of the letter if received, to all Councillors?

 

4.    Can Council confirm that as an Objector; as is listed on the DPIE major projects portal; that Liverpool City Council has until August 13th [56 days from June 18th] to exercise its right as an Objector as per s8.8 and s8.10 of the Act (Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 No 203)?

 

A response to these Questions with Notice will be provided in the 25 August 2021 Council Meeting Business Papers.

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       QWN 05

FILE NO:        234143.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Legal Reports and records

 

Does Council:

 

1.    Make available on the Councillor intranet, Liverpool Council’s Legal reports of all legal engagements on an Annual Basis listed first under:

a)    The years of a Council elected term, and also

b)    Year that the Council engagement was first initiated, eg: 2016 – 2021/ 2016 – 2017 etc,

 

That can be accessed by Councillors at any time, and also provide the use of a historic record for the transition of different elected members onto Council per term?

 

2.    Would it be possible for all past legal report records to be filed and made available in a similar fashion on the Councillor intranet for Councillors referral?

 

A response to these Questions with Notice will be provided in the 25 August 2021 Council Meeting Business Papers.

 

 

 

 

 


PRESENTATIONS

 

Clr Harle advised that he would like to make a presentation relating to CONF 01.

 

Mayor Waller advised that he could make his presentation prior to discussion of that item during the Closed Session part of this meeting.

 


 

Notices of Motion

 

ITEM NO:       NOM 01

FILE NO:        236016.2021

SUBJECT:     Proposed Changes to Developer Levies

 

BACKGROUND

 

Recently the NSW Government released draft legislation that proposed changes to reduce the type of community projects that could be eligible for funding from developer contributions. This is one component of an overhaul of NSW’s infrastructure contributions system, which is due to come into force by July 2022.

 

However, these changes, if adopted, could shift more of the cost of infrastructure from developers onto ratepayers. It also means there is no guarantees that the money collected as part of these developments would be directed back into projects in the local areas that these levies had been collected.

 

Liverpool, as part of the south-west growth corridor, is already under significant pressure to meet the infrastructure needs of our fast-growing community. We need to juggle the responsibilities associated with developing infrastructure from scratch in many of the new release areas of our LGA. Furthermore, there is a risk that these changes could result in the NSW Planning Minister having discretion over what these developer contributions are spent on, rather than having extensive input and determination by the local communities that would need and use this infrastructure.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Kaliyanda)

 

That Council:

 

1.      Write to the NSW Government expressing our concern over the impact of these proposed changes to the legislation on our local community;

 

2.      Seek a guarantee from the NSW Government that contributions levied in a local area will be spent on that community; and

 

3.    Seek a guarantee from the NSW Government that community consultation and voices of the local community will be given specific importance in the determination of infrastructure spending and delivery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Kaliyanda          Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council:

 

1.    Write to the NSW Government expressing our concern over the impact of these proposed changes to the legislation on our local community;

 

2.      Seek a guarantee from the NSW Government that contributions levied in a local area will be spent on that community;

 

3.      Seek a guarantee from the NSW Government that community consultation and voices of the local community will be given specific importance in the determination of infrastructure spending and delivery; and

 

4.      The matter to also be raised and explained at the Rural and Development area forums and any other relevant community forums.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       NOM 02

FILE NO:        236043.2021

SUBJECT:     COVID Support

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Hagarty)

 

1.    Testing and Vaccination

 

That Council lobby for:

a.    More locations and resources to conduct testing; and

b.    A mass vaccination hub in a highly accessible location in Liverpool.

 

2.    Parking for essential workers

 

That Council provides parking for essential workers including health care providers.

 

3.    Vulnerable community groups

 

That Council:

a.    Re-establish the ‘COVID-19 Emergency Response Program’ to support critical and essential services for vulnerable community groups in Liverpool.

b.    Lobby the State and Federal Government for long term funding and resources in local targeted services, including but not limited to:

·     mental health support for communities from non-English speaking backgrounds; and

·     youth unemployment.

 

4.    Rate relief

 

That Council extend hardship provisions for rates implemented at 16 April 2020 Council meeting.

 

5.    Community facilities and sporting fields

 

That Council provide a full refund for hirers/licence holders of any parks, sporting fields and other community facilities where a fee has been paid and the use of that facility is not possible due to restrictions being put into place for the duration of those restrictions.

 

6.    Animal Shelter

 

That Council direct the CEO to keep the Liverpool Animal Shelter open with restricted access and in line with relevant public health orders.

 

7.    Local Business

 

That Council:

a.    Support businesses to facilitate effective pivots of their existing business models;

b.    Promote successful examples of local business pivots since the beginning of the pandemic; and

c.    provide ongoing information and support to local businesses about relevant State and Federal business relief and support services.

 

8.    Retail tenants

 

That Council provide rent abatement for all existing retail and small tenants/licence holders for the duration of the lockdown.

 

9.    Outdoor dining

 

That Council waive all out-door dining fees for the duration of the lockdown.

 

10.  Supplier payments

 

That Council ensure all payments that can be made to suppliers where the goods/services have been delivered in full (noting some may be staged payments) be made immediately and not wait until the due date should that be a period of less than 2 months.

 

11.  Planning and Development

 

That Council commit to drive down the outstanding Development Applications and Planning Proposals.

 

12.  Staff

 

That Council direct the CEO to, where practical, retain staff during the lockdown, through meaningful means such as redeployment to other duties.

 

13.  Stimulus

 

That Council seek funding from the State and Federal Government for accelerated capital works projects that can be delivered in the Liverpool LGA within a short timeframe.

 

 

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

1.      Testing and Vaccination

 

That Council write to the State Government to advise that Council is willing to work with the government to help with offering locations for testing clinics, and vaccination hubs. 

 

2.      Parking for essential workers

 

That Council provides parking for essential workers including health care providers.

 

3.      Vulnerable community groups

 

That Council:

 

1.      Re-establish the ‘COVID-19 Emergency Response Program’ to support critical and essential services for vulnerable community groups in Liverpool;

 

2.      Lobby the State and Federal Government for long term funding and resources in local targeted services, including but not limited to:

a.      mental health support for vulnerable communities; and

b.      youth unemployment.

 

4.      Rate relief

 

That Council:

 

a.      Take the following measures in relation to hardship provisions:

1.      extends hardship provision to all rateable properties (i.e. residential, business and farmland);

2.      apply hardship provisions to rates that fall due from July 2021 onwards only;

3.      assign the Rates Department to undertake initial assessments of hardship applications;

4.      re-establishment the Hardship Committee to review all applications rejected for final determination;

5.      Council suspend debt recovery action until state-wide COVID related restrictions are lifted; and

6.      provide an online form to enable residents to submit hardship applications.

 

b.      Exhibit its intentions for the minimum statutory period for a one off reduction of 10% on properties that sit within the definition residential use subject to a criteria that would include but not limited to:

·           Property being used for owner occupier purposes;

·           At least one owner has claimed a government COVID disaster payment;

·           The property is in the name of an individual.

 

Present a report back to Council after the exhibition period. 

 

Note: Following the Council meeting, Councillors were advised that the information in italics above relating to the provision of a rate reduction within NOM 02 is unlawful. Therefore, section 4 (b) of NOM 02 cannot be enacted.

 

5.      Community facilities and sporting fields

 

a.      That Council:

 

1.      Provide a full refund for hirers/licence holders of any parks, sporting fields and other community facilities where a fee has been paid and the use of that facility is not possible due to Covid-19 restrictions being put in place for the duration of those Covid-19 restrictions; and

 

2.      If Covid-19 restrictions return, that this become a policy position of Council. 

 

6.      Animal Shelter

 

That Council direct the CEO to keep the Liverpool Animal Shelter open with restricted access and in line with relevant public health orders.

 

7.      Local Business

 

a.      That Council:

 

1.      Support businesses to facilitate effective pivots of their existing business models;

 

2.      Promote successful examples of local business pivots since the beginning of the pandemic;

 

3.      provide ongoing information and support to local businesses about relevant State and Federal business relief and support services;

 

4.      Create a business directory for free online services and investigate integrating this to Council’s What’s On page; and

 

5.      Write to the State Government calling for a resumption of construction in the Liverpool local government area (LGA) and allow construction workers living in the Liverpool LGA to resume work in line with Covid-19 health regulations.

 

8.      Retail tenants

 

That Council defer a decision on rent abatement for all existing retail and small tenants/licence holders until the August 2021 meeting.

 

9.      Outdoor dining

 

That Council waive all out-door dining fees for the 2021/22 and 2022/23 financial years.

 

10.   Supplier payments

 

That Council ensure all payments that can be made to suppliers where the goods/services have been delivered in full (noting some may be staged payments) be made immediately and not wait until the due date should that be a period of less than 2 months.

 

11.   Planning and Development

 

That Council commit to drive down the outstanding Development Applications and Planning Proposals.

 

12.   Staff

 

That Council direct the CEO to, where practical, retain staff during the lockdown, through meaningful means such as redeployment to other duties in accordance with the “splinter award”.

 

13.   Stimulus

 

That Council:

 

a.      Seek funding from the State and Federal Government for accelerated capital works projects that can be delivered in the Liverpool LGA within a short timeframe; and

 

b.      Direct the CEO to present a report to the next Council meeting of all capital expenditure which has a contract value of more than $500,000, excluding any projects fully funded by Section 7/11 or State or Federal grants, detailing:

·           The project/spend;

·           Importance of the project/spend; and

·           Whether a force majeure clause is included in the contract

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.


COUNCIL IN CLOSED SESSION

 

Mayor Waller advised that Council would now move into Closed Session to deal with items CONF 01 to CONF 06 because:

 

CONF 01 and CONF 05 are confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(d i) of the Local Government Act because they contain commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.

 

CONF 02, CONF 03 and CONF 04 are confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(g) of the Local Government Act because they contain advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

 

CONF 06 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

Council moved into Closed Session at 7.31pm. 

 

Clr Balloot retired from the meeting at 7.31pm.

 

Confidential Items

 

ITEM NO:       CONF 01

FILE NO:        201850.2021

SUBJECT:     Tender WT3013 - Construction of Stormwater Basin 6 in Austral

 

During this item, Clr Harle made a presentation to Councillors on Stormwater Channels in Urban Areas. The presentation is shown below:

 

 


 

Text, letter

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A picture containing text, grass, outdoor, tree

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COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Harle                  Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

1.      Accepts the Tender from Devcon Civil Pty Ltd for Tender WT3013 – Construction of Stormwater Basin 6 at Austral and Leppington North for an 8 month contract term and an additional 12 months defects liability period at the GST inclusive price of $3,885,957.23;

 

2.      Makes public its decision regarding Tender WT3013 – Construction of Stormwater Basin 6 at Austral and Leppington North;

 

3.      Delegates the Chief Executive Officer to finalise all details and sign the Letter of Acceptance following publication of draft Minutes on Council website for the tender, giving it contractual effect, in accordance with delegated authority;

 

4.      This report has been brought to Council because the Chief Executive Officer’s instrument of delegation, approved by Council in accordance with the current provisions of section 377 of the Local Government Act 1993, only permits the Chief Executive Officer to accept tenders up to a value of $2 million.

 

5.      Keeps confidential the details supplied in this report containing information on the submissions received, pursuant to the provisions of Section 10A(2)(d)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993 as it contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; and

 

6.      Identify suitable areas where underflow drainage would possibly work and report back to the September Council meeting.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 

Clr Balloot had left the meeting prior to this item and was not in the meeting when this item was discussed.

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       CONF 02

FILE NO:        206958.2021

SUBJECT:     Fire and Rescue NSW Referrals

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Hagarty

 

That Council:

 

1.    Note the inspection report by Fire and Rescue NSW, as shown in Attachment 1; and

 

2.    Exercise its power to issue a Fire Safety Order as recommended by Council’s Fire Safety Officer to address the identified fire safety deficiencies.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       CONF 03

FILE NO:        225644.2021

SUBJECT:     Legal Affairs Report - 1 April 2021 - 30 June 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

1.      Receive and note the report concerning the legal affairs of Liverpool City Council; and

 

2.      A report to be received at the August Council meeting once a response is received in relation to line item 28 of the confidential report.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       CONF 04

FILE NO:        230833.2021

SUBJECT:     Report back on CONF 04 - NOM from Clr Rhodes - Moorebank Intermodal Development possible negative impact on Liverpool residents from 26 May 2021 Council meeting

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Karnib 

 

That Council receive legal advice on whether the documents received can be publicly released.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 


 

ITEM NO:       CONF 05

FILE NO:        234109.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Liverpool Animal Shelter

 

 

A response to the Questions with Notice will be provided in the 25 August 2021 Council Meeting Business Papers.

 

 

 

 


 

 

Clr Hadid temporarily left the meeting at 8.54pm.

ITEM NO:       CONF 06

FILE NO:        237867.2021

SUBJECT:     Consideration of an Application for the acquisition of land on the grounds of hardship - 46 Boyd Street, Austral identified as Lot 122 in DP 738282

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council:

 

1.    Approves the hardship application and the acquisition of 46 Boyd Street, Austral identified as Lot 122 in DP 738282 on the basis that there is no income being derived from the property by the owner and on the terms outlined in this report;

 

2.    Delegates authority to, and directs the CEO and his delegates to enter into negotiations with the property owner and/or their representative to acquire the property by agreement on the basis recommended in this report without having to submit a further report to Council for approval;

 

3.    Delegates authority to, and directs the CEO and his delegates in the event that agreement cannot be reached, to proceed with all necessary steps to give effect to the compulsory acquisition of the property;

 

4.    Delegates authority to, and directs the CEO and his delegates, to proceed with making the necessary application to the Minister for Local Government and the Governor in accordance with the Local Government Act, 1993 to obtain approval to acquire the property in accordance with the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991;

 

5.    Resolves that, upon acquisition, 46 Boyd Street, Austral identified as Lot 122 in DP 738282 is classified as operational land in accordance with the Local Government Act, 1993;

 

6.    Authorises its delegated officer to execute any document, under Power of Attorney, necessary to give effect to this decision; and

 

7.    Keeps this report confidential pursuant to the provisions of Section 10(A)(2)(c) of the Local Government Act, 1993 as this information would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


 

OPEN SESSION

 

Council moved back into Open Session at 9.04pm. Mayor Waller read out the resolutions that were passed in Closed Session (as shown on the previous pages).

 

Clr Hadid returned to the meeting at 9.07pm

 

 

THE MEETING CLOSED AT 9.09PM.

 

 

 

 

<Signature>

Name: Wendy Waller

Title:    Mayor

Date:    25 August 2021

I have authorised a stamp bearing my signature to be affixed to the pages of the Minutes of the Council Meeting held on  28 July 2021. I confirm that Council has adopted these Minutes as a true and accurate record of the meeting.

 


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Planning & Compliance Report

 

PLAN 01

Draft Amendment to Liverpool Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

247426.2021

Report By

Masud Hasan - Senior Strategic Planner

Approved By

David Smith - Acting Director Planning & Compliance

 

Executive Summary

 

Council received a planning proposal request from Vicliz Pty Ltd to rezone land at 1370 Camden Valley Way, Leppington (Lot E in DP28997), to amend development standards and expand the existing Neighbourhood Centre retail floor area. Supporting amendments to Schedule 3 - East Leppington Precinct of the Liverpool Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan (the DCP) are required to reflect the changes proposed under the planning proposal.

 

At its meeting on 30 September 2020, Council resolved among other matters:

 

That Council:

 

2.    Endorses in principle the planning proposal request, subject to the proponent finalising the required amendments to the Liverpool Growth Centres Precinct DCP;

 

6.    Forwards the planning proposal to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment pursuant to Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, seeking a Gateway determination with a recommendation that amendments to the Liverpool Growth Centres Precinct DCP is included as a Gateway condition to be satisfied prior to public exhibition;

 

On 22 December 2020, the planning proposal received a Gateway determination from the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE).

 

As required by points 2 and 6 of the 30 September 2020 Council resolution, the draft amendments to the DCP have been finalised (Attachment 1) in consultation with the proponent. The amendments include changes to the local road network, pedestrian and cycleway network and the layout of the Neighbourhood Centre in the DCP. This is achieved by amending the relevant DCP controls, maps and figures, including the Indicative Layout Plan (ILP). The proposed DCP amendments ensure that the DCP planning controls are consistent with the planning proposal.

 

It is recommended that Council endorses the proposed DCP amendments and proceeds to publicly exhibit the draft DCP in accordance with Council’s Community Participation Plan.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Place the draft amendment to the Liverpool Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan on public exhibition for 28 days in accordance with Clause 18 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 and the Liverpool Community Participation Plan 2019; and

 

2.    Receive a further report on the outcomes of public exhibition and community consultation on the planning proposal, voluntary planning agreement and DCP amendment.

 

REPORT

 

Background

 

Council received a planning proposal request (LLEP Amendment 88) from Vicliz Pty Ltd, the landowner of 1370 Camden Valley Way, Leppington (Lot E in DP28997), to rezone part of the land. The planning proposal also sought to amend the development standards applying to the land and expand the existing Neighbourhood Centre retail floor area to accommodate additional retail floor area demand in the precinct. Supporting amendments are required to Schedule 3 - East Leppington Precinct of the Liverpool Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan (the DCP) to ensure the DCP is consistent with the planning proposal. 

 

Council at its meeting on 30 September 2020 provided in principle support for the planning proposal and resolved to forward the planning proposal to DPIE seeking a Gateway determination. Council further resolved to finalise any required DCP amendments with the proponent before it is publicly exhibited.

 

On 22 December 2020, the planning proposal received a Gateway determination from DPIE, which advised the planning proposal and its associated supporting documents be publicly exhibited, subject to conditions. Consequently, the draft DCP amendments have been prepared, in consultation with the proponent, and it is recommended that Council endorse the DCP amendment for public exhibition and community consultation.

 

Subject to Council’s endorsement, the DCP amendments will be exhibited with the planning proposal and the supporting planning agreement. This will enable members of the community to comment on all aspects of the proposal.

 

Amendments to the Liverpool Growth Centre Precincts Development Control Plan

 

Amendments to the DCP have reflected changes to the zone boundaries and the increase in retail GFA provision (from 2,500m2 to 4,800 m2), consistent with the planning proposal. The amendments include further changes to the local road network, pedestrian and cycleway network and the layout of the Neighbourhood Centre in the DCP. This is achieved by amending the DCP controls, maps and figures, including the Indicative Layout Plan (ILP) as detailed below:

 

·     ILP Map – The ILP is a map in the DCP which shows the future road network, and the land uses in the precinct (e.g., residential, open space etc.). This provides Council, developers, and landowners with certainty as to how the land will be developed in a coordinated manner. The ILP is proposed to be amended as follows:

 

1.    The road currently located to the north of the Neighbourhood Centre is relocated to the northern boundary of the subject site. This is to reflect the extended Neighbourhood Centre area and to provide a road connection with residential developments to the north of the centre.

 

2.    The local road along the western edge of the open space area, is realigned to make it consistent with the reconfigured zoning boundaries.

 

3.    The local road connecting the Neighbourhood Centre to the reconfigured open space area, is envisaged to be widened to allow for a tree lined boulevard with pedestrian and cycleway emphasis. This will provide pedestrian and cycleway connection between the Neighbourhood Centre and the public recreation area, facilitating easy access and visual connection to the open space area.

 

4.    The ILP road section connecting the precinct with the intersection of Camden Valley Way and Cowpasture Road, is realigned. The road realignment will make the ILP consistent with LEP Map Amendment 1 adopted by Council on 31 March 2021, and subsequently gazetted on 18 June 2021. 

 

The draft ILP amendments are demonstrated in Figure 1 and 2.

Figure 1: Current ILP road network

 

Diagram

Description automatically generated

Figure 2: Proposed amendments to the ILP road network

·     Section 3.1 – The numerical restriction on retail Gross Floor Area (GFA) of the Neighbourhood Centre under Section 3.1 of the East Leppington Precinct DCP is amended. The upper limit of the permissible retail GFA within the centre has been increased from 2,500m2 to 4,800m2. This is to reflect the proposed increase of retail GFA under the planning proposal.

 

·     Figure 3-2 – A revised layout is proposed to replace the current layout of the neighbourhood centre at ‘Figure 3-2: Desired future layout of the Neighbourhood Centre’ of the DCP (refer to Figure 3 and 4 below). The proposed layout represents the extended area of the Neighbourhood Centre. It outlines public domain interfaces such as points of entry, active facades, vehicle access points and loading areas to guide the future development of the centre.

Figure 3: Current ‘desired future layout of the Neighbourhood Centre’ figure

Figure 4: Proposed amended desired future layout of the Neighbourhood Centre figure

 

·     A new clause (Clause 7) and new Figure 3-3 (refer to Figure 5 below) are included to subsection 3.1 East Leppington Neighbourhood Centre under Section 3 - Centre Development Controls of the DCP. This is to ensure the design and construction of the street (tree lined boulevard) is consistent with the proposed DCP amendments.

 

The proposed clause of the DCP will read:

 

Despite section 3.3.1 of the Main DCP, the design and construction of the street (tree lined boulevard) that connects the Neighbourhood Centre with the local park and Bonds Creek corridor, are to be consistent with Figure 3-3, Council’s Engineering Design Guide and Austroads.

 

Figure 5: Layout of the street (tree lined boulevard) connecting the Neighbourhood Centre with the local park and Bonds Creek corridor.

 

·     Additional site-specific controls for the subject site are included under the newly added Section 4.6 of the DCP. This is to ensure that future development within the subject site will create active frontage with public domain, including the public open space area. This will further assist in providing passive surveillance, limiting opportunities for concealment and other crime related activities as well as enhancing community safety.

 

Miscellaneous Amendments to the DCP

 

The following maps and figures in the East Leppington Precinct DCP are amended to reflect the changes to zoning boundaries, the local road network, the Neighbourhood Centre layout and the pedestrian and cycleway network (Attachment 1). Respective page numbers of the amended DCP figures in the draft DCP are provided below.

 

·     Figure 2-3: Key elements of water cycle management and ecology strategy (at page no. 13)

·     Figure 2-7: Bushfire risk and asset protection zone requirements (at page no. 18)

·     Figure 2-10: Potential noise attenuation measures (at page no. 22)

·     Figure 2-11: Residential structure (at page no. 24)

·     Figure 2-12: Precinct road hierarchy (at page no. 26)

·     Figure 2-13: Pedestrian and cycleway network (at page no. 28)

·     Figure 2-19:  Desired future subdivision layout – Very Low Density Residential – Upper Canal (at page no. 37)

·     Figure 3-1: Location of Neighbourhood Centre (at page no. 40) 

·     Figure 3-2: Desired future layout of the Neighbourhood Centre (at page no. 44)

 

Consultation

 

Consultation was undertaken with Council’s internal departments including Community Planning, Transport Management and City Design and Public Domain teams.

 

Subject to Council endorsing the draft DCP, community consultation will be undertaken for 28 days, as required by Council’s Community Participation Plan.

 

Next Steps

 

Subject to Council endorsement, the draft DCP will be publicly exhibited with the planning proposal, draft VPA and supporting documents. A post-exhibition report to Council will be prepared following the public exhibition period detailing submissions received and any amendments proposed to the planning proposal and the DCP.

 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Facilitate economic development

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations


Social

Regulate for a mix of housing types that responds to different population groups such as young families and older people.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision-making processes.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Draft DCP Amendment (Under separate cover)

2.         ASIC - Current Extract - VICLIZ PTY LTD - Confidential


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Community & Culture Report

 

COM 01

Community Gardens Options Paper

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Implement access and equity for all members of the community

File Ref

179274.2021

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Tina Bono - Acting Director Community & Culture

 

Executive Summary

 

At its meeting of 2 February 2021, Council resolved to:

 

1.    Explore the feasibility of expanding community gardens, including footpath gardening and their long-term operation and financial sustainability; and

 

2.    Report back the finding to Council at the June 2021 Council meeting.

 

Council staff have conducted a comprehensive review of Liverpool’s existing community gardens, including current and historical gardens. This review included:

·     The cost of establishing and maintaining existing gardens (both monetary and staff resources);

·     The benefits and limitations of existing gardens;

·     A review of opportunities and limitations of community and verge garden models by other councils; and

·     A review of alternative models of supporting the community with gardening opportunities, including developer and community driven gardens.

 

This report outlines the key findings of the review and presents three options for Council’s consideration:

 

1.    To expand the existing community gardens network and allocate funding of $100,000 per annum to engage a dedicated Community Gardens officer and to cover operational costs. Establishment costs of each new community garden is estimated at $50,000-$70,000. This option is not recommended as there is no expressed demand to justify this level of investment.


 

2.    Encourage community and developer driven opportunities for individual and communal gardening on private property in Liverpool. This could include rooftop gardening, balcony gardening and garden beds in common areas.

 

3.    Make no changes, maintain the existing community garden network with no further expansion.

 

A detailed overview of options, associated costs, benefits and limitations and potential risks are outlined for Council’s consideration.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes this report; and 

 

2.    Encourages community and developer driven opportunities for individual and communal gardening on private property in Liverpool. This could include rooftop gardening, balcony gardening and garden beds in common areas.

 

REPORT

 

1.   Background

Liverpool’s community gardens network was predominately initiated under the Living Streets Program (LSP). The LSP was a grant-funded project which commenced in 1997 and ceased in 2015. The LSP included a dedicated part-time Program Coordinator, whose role was to engage and work with communities in areas of identified disadvantage across Liverpool. They worked closely with various agencies and community groups; and applied community cultural development techniques to engage with residents to create sustainable and vibrant new urban spaces, such as community gardens and public art initiatives. Initiated by LSP, there are currently three community gardens in Liverpool that are being supported by Council.

 

Hart Park

 

In 2004, LSP received funding for two years from the Western Sydney Area Assistance Scheme (WSAAS) to work with the residents of Warwick Farm in developing a set of creative and engaging community programs. The project was delivered in partnership with Liverpool Health Service, Liverpool Migrant Resource Centre (now Western Sydney Migrant Resource Centre), NSW Housing Tenancy Services, University of Western Sydney Cultural Studies Centre and Warwick Farm Neighbourhood Centre, now known as Liverpool Neighbourhood Connections (LNC). 

 

The funds were used to establish a community cultural development program providing opportunities for local people to be engaged in creative artworks and gardening projects. The key objective was to transform public spaces and create a sense of place which promotes livability, safety, and beauty within the urban environment. As part of this project, the Hart Park Organic Community Garden and Orchard was established in 2007. Once established, the Hart Park Community Garden incurred further running costs including gardening materials, tools, seedlings, a shed, and a rainwater tank.

 

The Hart Park Community Garden was established in an area of high-density apartment living to increase opportunity for community activities and access to healthy foods. The garden consists of 16 individual garden beds and a shared fruit orchard and vegetable garden space. Access to the garden is by membership only. This garden is managed by a diverse group of residents and includes public art installations.

 

Since its establishment, the Hart Park Community Garden has demonstrated an overreliance on Council staff for the day-to-day operations, compared to other community gardens in Liverpool. In addition to the establishment costs of over $35,000, the garden also receives occasional financial support from Council for maintenance purposes, including the donation of materials.

 

Light Horse Park

 

The Light Horse Park Community Garden was funded by the Department of Planning through the Georges River Foreshore Improvement Program. The Light Horse Park Community Garden was completed by Working Proudly, a community-based transition to employment program. Work on the Light Horse Park Community Garden commenced in March 2003 and over 190 Working Proudly participants spent a combined 104 weeks developing this garden. The garden was officially opened in 2006 and incurred establishment costs of more than $300,000.

 

The garden contains 18 raised garden beds measuring 5m x 5m each and includes a shade structure, fence, irrigation system and storage bays. Access to the garden is by membership only. This garden is largely self-sufficient and is managed by a diverse group of residents. Members of the garden meet regularly to update each other on garden news and maintain the common areas.

 

Dunbier Park

 

Not much is known about the origins of the Dunbier Park community garden and who was involved in its establishment. However, it is understood the garden was supported in part by the LSP (likely after establishment) with the supply of materials, including fencing, engagement with gardeners, and the development of garden rules. The garden was launched in 2010. The establishment cost of this garden is unknown.

 

The garden consists of 14 raised garden beds growing a variety of seasonal and fresh produce. Access to the garden is by membership only. The garden membership consists of women only and is largely self-managed. This garden also receives occasional financial support from Council for maintenance purposes.

 

Living Garden

 

In 2004, The Living Streets Project was awarded a grant of $39,440 from the Australian Council for Arts. The funds were passed on to the Uniting Church Liverpool and the project was managed by the Living Streets Project Coordinator.

 

The Living Garden at the corner of Pirie and Speed Streets, Liverpool was a partnership project between the Uniting Church and Liverpool City Council. The Uniting Church donated an unused parcel of land (approximately 14 m x 13.8m) for at least 5 years, for the creation of a mosaic flower garden for the enjoyment of all residents and visitors. The project commenced on 15 May 2005, with artists running a series of design consultations and ceramic & mosaic workshops with the local community and schools. This was followed by several flower/shrub planting weekends and the launch of the garden on 26 May 2006. The site was planned as a place for people to relax, reflect and enjoy a safe and peaceful environment, with a welcoming flower garden and fountain.

 

The Uniting Church agreed to the full community use of the space on the provision that a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) be drawn up between the Church and Council. An Advisory Committee was established to direct the project and it consisted of the Living Streets Program Coordinator and representatives from STARTTS, Liverpool Migrant Resource Centre, NSW Refugee Health Service, Liverpool Uniting Church, Liverpool TAFE Outreach, and the community garden group. The garden space still exists but is not currently open to the public.

 

Food4Life Market, Warwick Farm

 

The Food4Life Market was established in Warwick Farm by the Salvation Army and Sydney South-West Local Health District (then Area Health Service). Due to its track record of establishing sustainable community gardens, Council’s Living Streets Project was invited by SWSLHD to support the establishment of a community garden in the large backyard of the food market to sustain the Food4Life Market with fresh edible produce. Living Streets introduced new partners to the garden project including Liverpool TAFE and Warwick Farm Neighbourhood Centre. The community garden has since ceased operation.

 

The Gathering Place, Heckenberg

 

Launched in 2009, The Gathering Place was a partnership project between the LSP, Miller TAFE, Green Corps, and the Heckenberg Neighbourhood Centre. The garden was designed with two large seating areas with public art installations and assorted planted herbs and garden beds. The garden was located outside the Heckenberg Community Centre at Busby and was enjoyed and cared for by residents accessing the community centre. Over the years, the garden was abandoned, and the seating structures were considered unsafe resulting in the garden being removed in early 2020.

 

The Resting Place community garden, St Mark’s Anglican Church, Spica St, Sadleir

 

This community garden was facilitated by Council’s LSP in partnership with Anglicare, St Mark’s Anglican Church, Ashcroft High School, Crossroads Christian Centre Casula and MTC Work Solutions. In 2008, Anglicare hosted the ‘Celebrate 2168’ event to develop a design concept with resident input. Once the design was developed and approved, the ‘Work for the Dole’ program was engaged to develop the garden including paving, garden beds and construction of a pergola. Ashcroft High School students developed a mosaic mural installed on the garden shed. Church members and Anglicare were responsible for the continued maintenance of the garden by providing access to fresh produce such as herbs and vegetables as well as a meeting place for families and children. This community garden has since ceased operation. 

 

Schools Gardens

 

Many school gardens benefit from Council’s Sustainable Environment Grants Program through the provision of funding toward establishment and operational costs of gardens within school grounds, including funding to:

·     Wattle Grove Public School;

·     Ashcroft Public School;

·     Holy Spirit Catholic Primary School Carnes Hill;

·     Heckenberg Public School;

·     Hoxton Park Public School; and

·     Marsden Road Public School.

 

In 2009, a community garden was coordinated by LSP in partnership with Miller Technology High School, Community 2168 Project, MTC Work Solutions and Green Corps. This garden allowed residents, particularly those who may live in units, to access plots of land to grow organic fruit and vegetables. The design had input from many students at the school as well as residents. A group of young people participating in a Green Corps project developed the garden, including plots and a nursery. The school provided water tanks and built a fence and gate to allow for separate access to the garden. Residents participated in an organic gardening course through Miller TAFE Outreach and were provided with keys. A gardening club was established with rosters for maintenance and upkeep. Membership fees were put towards communal tools and resources. Stage two of the project involved an art overlay of the area, a pergola, kitchenette, and community space. This garden is now primarily used by Miller Technology High School for sustainability education purposes.

 


 

 

2.   Traditional Community Gardens

 

A review of the traditional community garden model and their operations and a comparative analysis of their benefits and limitations to that of a verge garden model has been undertaken.

 

Benefits and Limitations of traditional community gardens

 

Community gardens are a part of the sharing economy within an area. In an urban setting, community gardens are referred to as Urban Gardens or Urban Farming. They make it possible for many people to enjoy a resource - in this case, land for gardening that they may not have access to or could not afford on their own. However, it’s not just the gardeners themselves who gain from community gardens – the benefits extend to the rest of the neighbourhood and even to society.[1]

 

Community Gardens can benefit a community in different ways, including beautification, access to fresh produce, community participation and connections, educational opportunities and generating income locally. 

 

Figure 1: Image of a traditional community garden

 

Liverpool’s community gardens were developed to be largely self-managed with sporadic input from Council on matters such as membership, gardener participation and conduct, and financial support. However, historically the sustainability and operations of all gardens were highly dependent on Council and other stakeholders’ financial and management support.

 

The following is an analysis of benefits and limitations of Liverpool community gardens:

 

Benefits of the existing model

Limitations/ risks of the existing model

Gardeners are not under any formal deed or agreement with Council to use the public space. There are no upfront costs associated with third party Public Liability Insurance or Incorporation fees.

‘Top down’ approach with establishing the community gardens can place less onus on the communities resulting in some community gardens depending heavily on Council for support or are at risk of becoming unsustainable.

Some have become largely self-managed community gardens with only occasional requests to Council, such as the Light Horse Park Community Garden

Following the discontinuation of the LSP there is no designated position that can assist with building autonomy and the capacity of the gardeners. This includes funding advice, operational funds, ongoing engagement and gardening and workshops.

No fixed tenure allows residents to manage a garden plot indefinitely.

With no fixed tenure, gardeners can hold onto a garden plot for decades. This makes it next to impossible for residents on a long waiting list to get an opportunity to participate in the garden.

No cost to gardeners for initial set up of the gardens as they were delivered through a funding model. 

The cost with establishing community gardens in the existing model is not cost effective or sustainable. Fencing is particularly expensive. A lot of money and resources has gone into starting up and supporting community gardens.

Garden rules developed to support day to day operation of the community gardens.

Can be resource intensive for Council staff to sort out issues within the community gardens. Conflict between gardeners and ‘rule breaking’ are tricky to prove and resolve as the third party. The garden rules are difficult to monitor and enforce. Gardeners can break rules continuously and may not be held accountable. Council needs to manage disputes and grievances.

Fencing around the community gardens has low vandalism rates.

Fenced community gardens can appear exclusive and ‘shut out’ from the rest of the parks. Provides only limited access for the community to enjoy, be part of, and learn from the gardens.

 

An expansion of large-scale community gardens in Liverpool would include the identification of appropriate land, consultation with community and the development of a more formalised management model. The size, scale and number of gardens would be based on community demand and access to sufficient space in various locations across the Liverpool LGA.

 

Risks and benefits

 

Community gardens provide a benefit to community members by supporting the provision of access to fresh produce, green spaces, and social opportunities. Currently, this benefit is limited to those residents who have been allocated a plot in a fenced community garden. The plots are usually allocated at the establishment phase of a community garden through an Expression of Interest process and are likely to change unless returned to Council by the resident. The expansion of the community garden network in Liverpool would allow for greater access by community members to garden spaces, and thus greater benefit to a wider range of community members.

 

Currently, Liverpool’s community gardens are governed by a Gardener Agreement, which outlines the expectations and responsibilities of both Council and participants in the garden. This agreement is informal and does not include considerations such as insurance, licensing, and tenure. Should Council wish to expand its community garden network by installing more large-scale fenced community gardens, the following factors and impacts would need to be considered: 

·     A formal, legal agreement with participants which outlines the individual and group responsibilities including:

The need for community groups to be incorporated in order to apply for funding from Council and other external sources;

The requirements of community groups to hold Public Liability Insurance and implement appropriate risk management strategies; and

Adherence to Council’s Code of Conduct and other legal requirements.

·    The identification of suitable land including size, suitability, zoning, ownership identification (State, Council, or Crown) and possible future use;

·    Licensing of land and potential Property Agreements with participants;

·    Development of a Management Plan for each garden;

·    Site access, capacity, and operating hours;

·    Access to start-up funding (through Council grants or other external sources);

·    Responsibility for ongoing maintenance of the larger site; and

·    Tenure of participants and the use of the land as a community garden;

 

Noting that demand for expansion of community gardens has been low, there is a risk to Council that a large financial commitment to expanding community garden will result in minimal community benefit, should participation in community gardens continue to be low.

 

Establishment and ongoing costs

 

Expanding the community garden network represents the highest financial cost to Council of all three options. Based on establishment costs of existing community gardens, the cost of establishing new community gardens is anticipated to be approximately $50,000 per garden. This amount is higher at present due to higher cost of materials and resources and has limited social return on investment for Council. Further, based on the existing community gardens operational budget, ongoing costs of $5,000–6,000 per garden would be required to support maintenance, materials, and resources.

 

Additionally, the resources required to manage an expansion and ongoing management of community gardens do not exist and would need to be allocated. In order to effectively manage this expansion and the ongoing management and implementation of community gardens to a sufficient standard, a full-time dedicated position would be required. The financial cost to Council to employ an additional officer for this purpose would be approximately $100,000, including salaries and on-costs.

 

In addition to these costs, while there are social benefits for participating gardeners, Council may experience a financial loss on the value of land dedicated to community gardens. Where such land may have been earmarked for sale or redevelopment, this value will be impacted by its use as a community garden. This cost is unknown as it will be dependent on the identified land earmarked for gardens.

 

An expansion of the current community garden model is not recommended.

 

3.   Verge Gardens

 

Verge gardening is the practice of growing ornamental, native or edible plants on the nature strip. In many local government areas, residents can utilise the nature strip to create gardens which grow fresh produce or other plants. Verge gardens can be established by a single resident or, such as is seen in many cases around central Sydney and the Inner West, a group of residents living on the same street may establish a larger shared garden.

 

 

Figure 2 - Samples of verge gardens

 

 

Despite the suitability of this model in some council areas, the review of potential verge gardening option in Liverpool has highlighted some potential risks. The following is an analysis of benefits and limitations/ risks of verge gardens:

 

Benefits of verge gardens

 

·      Verge gardens are considered a simple, low-cost substitute to traditional fenced community gardens that typically have very high start-up costs.

·      Verge gardens can contribute to a Council’s plans to “green” urban spaces, particularly those with high density residential areas and in spaces where parks and open space options are limited.

·      Verge gardens can be implemented anywhere where trees can’t be planted such as under powerlines and in areas where height restrictions apply.

 

Limitations/ risks of verge gardens:

 

·     Concerns regarding soil contamination are relevant to many LGAs, including Liverpool.  

·     The use of inappropriate edging, plants growing over the footpath and roots impacting below the footpath causing cracks and other damage which impedes mobility and presents a trip hazard for residents.

·     The planting of inappropriate plants such as those which are hazardous to humans and poisonous to domestic and wild animals such as dogs, cats and birds.

·     The impact of verge gardens on sightlines for motorists and pedestrians across driveways and intersections presenting a risk to public safety.

·     Risk of interference to underground services such as water, gas and electricity lines.

·     Risk of poorly maintained gardens due to changes in resident circumstances or residents moving houses and costs to Council to make good the verge.     

·     Impacts on council and other public services such as the placement of bins and household clean up services, mail delivery and water/electricity main readings.

·     Objections from neighbouring properties to the establishment of a verge garden can lead to neighbourhood disputes and possible legal proceedings.

·     Varying types of nature strips across an LGA, such as fully concreted pavements (all the way to the road) or large nature strips (in locations where footpaths do not create a clear delineation between private land and Council property), narrow or sloping nature strips being incompatible with a garden.

·     Management of communication and information across various council departments whose input would be required into each application for a verge garden.

 

Information around verge gardening in Liverpool is limited and Council has not previously engaged in verge gardening initiatives.

 

With consideration to varied potential risks and limitations, establishment of verge gardens in Liverpool is not recommended.

 

4.   Developer and Community Driven Gardens

 

Liverpool City is undergoing rapid change and development. The Liverpool LGA is one of the fastest growing local government areas in NSW, experiencing substantial growth in both urban release areas and redevelopment in established areas. This provides a unique opportunity for community participation in gardening from a different approach.

 

 

Figure 3 - Image of rooftop gardening

 

This approach encourages the development of community gardens by developers and their future residents on private land. In this model a developer is encouraged to include community garden infrastructure in the early stages of their concept designs. Such infrastructure could include rooftop and balcony gardening in high rise developments and garden beds in common areas of low-rise residential buildings. This model also supports Resilient Sydney Strategy for creating cool homes and streets and green and resilient buildings.

 

 Figure 4 - Image of balcony gardening with garden beds and vertical gardens

 

Rooftop and balcony gardening have become a new trend in many cities where there are competing demands for land and green spaces. Marketing and expanding this model in Liverpool is recommended. A preliminary assessment of this approach has not identified planning barriers and can be considered for inclusion in the review of the DCP.

 

Developers are taking an increased interest in rating systems such as building standards and residents’ experiences in their living environment. Rooftop or balcony gardening can be an enticing prospect for developers to consider, as a viable and valuable asset. In this model, Council will have a supporting role, rather than a leading role. This supporting role could include, but not limited to, encouraging developers’ interest in incorporating gardening spaces in design and development, and information and resources for residents.

 

5.   Information and educational resources

 

Councils are best positioned to support the community with information and educational packs around gardening practices. Creating gardens (individual or group) and maintaining a healthy and sustainable garden is a big task that many people struggle to appropriately manage. While there are many resources online about starting a garden, sifting through them and deciding on the best approach can be challenging. For this, it is recommended that Council develop and make available an information and resource pack for the community.

 

Council’s environment and waste education programs run gardening and composting workshops for the community. It is recommended that further gardening educational and training sessions be incorporated in programming of the future Environmental Education Centre.

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.    Strategic alignment

 

Recreation, Open Space and Sports (ROSS) Strategy

 

Council’s ROSS Strategy is a key strategic document that provides a long-term framework for the planning of parks and open spaces (inclusive of the open space network) within the Liverpool LGA. One of the key objectives of the strategy is to create ‘places for people’ to encourage greater opportunities for meetings and daily activities, have spontaneous conversations and develop connections. The strategy aims at creating places that respond to the daily needs of the diverse population, provide for multi-purpose use of the space for multiple activities to function together and thus establish a confident relationship with their neighbours and the locals. Community gardens are one such use of public spaces.

 

This higher density living in apartments and compact dwelling sizes will exert additional pressure on the existing supply of open space. To merge the gap between existing provision and required supply of open space, ROSS Strategy and studies like the Liverpool Green Grid Study 2019 aims at identifying green grid corridors that connect existing parks, reserves, and open spaces to establish an open space network. This study supports the recommended option of this report, to maximise green spaces via rooftops and landscaping with community gardening as a catalyst.

 

Liverpool City Centre Public Domain Masterplan

 

The adopted Liverpool City Centre Public Domain Master Plan (Master Plan) recommends an expansion of the community gardens located at Hart Park and Dunbier Park within the Liverpool City Centre to encourage sustainable food production and increased community participation. The Master Plan also includes planted verges, as potential alternatives to turfed and/or paved verges in various locations. This includes planting to create a physical barrier between pedestrians and motorists, planting in locations where trees can’t be planted due to underground/overhead services, utilities, and other obstructions such as awnings; and in locations where turf is not growing successfully. While planting verges has been identified, due to outlined risks planting of edible foods (fruit and vegetables) is not recommended.

 

Environment Education Programs

 

Council’s environmental education and engagement is primarily delivered by the Environment Restoration Plan (ERP) program, funded by the Environment Levy. The ERP Program has a fixed scope limited by its governance framework. There is currently no capacity to include the community gardens portfolio within the ERP Program or provide financial support from the Environment Levy.

 

Council’s Waste program, funded by the Waste Levy, also delivers educational content where the focus is on managing domestic food and green waste, namely composting and worm farms. The Waste Program also provides rebates to ratepayers for worm farms and compost bins. 

 

7.   Conclusion

 

Community gardens in Liverpool were predominately developed under the LSP which was funded externally from 1997 to 2015. There are three Council managed gardens, and several other gardens that are being operated externally, by schools or community organisations.

 

Specific to this report, community gardens, verge gardens, and an alternative model of rooftop and balcony gardening as main models in urban gardening have been reviewed. The review included their delivery and management in Liverpool and other local councils, as well as benefits and limitations.

 

With consideration to the high cost and operation and management resources required for expansion of existing community garden models, expressed low demand and potential risks associated with verge gardening, it is recommended that Council encourages community and developer driven opportunities for individual and communal gardening on private property in Liverpool. This could include rooftop gardening, balcony gardening and garden beds in common areas.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Should Council consider option 1 funds will be required for expansion of community gardens, toward the development and construction stages and operational cost. This should be appropriately considered during the 2022/23 budget planning process. 

Environment

Support environmental education and awareness.


Social

Build community connection and enhance participation.

Reduce social isolation.


Civic Leadership

Undertake communication practices with the community and stakeholders across a range of media.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

Risk

The risk is deemed to be low.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting 25 August 2021

Community & Culture Report

 

COM 02

Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Implement access and equity for all members of the community

File Ref

234155.2021

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Tina Bono - Acting Director Community & Culture

 

 

Executive Summary

 

Council is committed to building strong and resilient communities in the Liverpool Local Government Area (LGA) and to maximising social wellbeing. Council helps achieve these goals by providing financial support through grants and sponsorships to develop leadership skills, increase participation in community activities and address identified social issues.

 

Impacts from COVID-19 and respective physical distancing requirements continue to limit the capacity and eligibility of programs, projects, or events. To ascertain community safety, demonstrate compliance with NSW Health guidelines, and demonstrate evidence of proactive and measurable program governance, all applicants have been requested to provide information on their compliance with COVID-19 safety guidelines.

 

This report provides recommendations for funding totalling $25,000 from the Corporate  Sponsorship and Matching Grants programs.

 

The delivery of the endorsed programs is subject to ‘COVID Permit’ condition. Should the funded program be impacted, a new timeframe or return of funds to Council will be negotiated with applicants.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council endorses the recommendation of $10,000 (GST exclusive) under the Corporate Sponsorship Program for the following projects:

 

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Hindu Council of Australia

Deepavali - Festival of Lights

$7,800

 

 

That Council endorses the recommendation of $15,000 (GST exclusive) under the Matching Grants Program for the following projects:

 

Applicant

Project

Recommended

HelpMe Feed Foundation Ltd

HelpMe Feed maternal and child health support for CALD women

 

$15,000

 

REPORT

 

Corporate Sponsorship

 

The Corporate Sponsorship Program received one application which met the eligibility criteria and is recommended for funding as follows:

 

Applicant 

Hindu Council of Australia

Project 

Deepavali - Festival of Lights

Amount Requested

$10,000

Total Project Cost

$14,000

Location

Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre, Casula (CPAC)

Date

23/10/2021

About the Applicant

Hindu Council of Australia’s (HCA) mission is to build a strong and cohesive Hindu community in Australia. This includes contribution to Australian society culturally and economically, and living in harmony with other communities while promoting and sharing values of the Hindu faith, culture and traditions.

Description 

Objectives:

Host an internationally recognised and culturally enriching festival in celebration of Deepavali, the Festival of Lights. The event will take place at CPAC and will feature a prominent Kolu doll display in collaboration with CPAC curators, puppetry, music and live performances sequencing the events of the Ramayana, cultural programs and food stalls.

 

Outcomes:

·     An opportunity for local communities, businesses, suppliers, and volunteers to contribute positively to a culturally significant event in the Liverpool LGA;

·     A platform to host a range of activities in the area and opportunities for people from diverse backgrounds and communities to showcase their culture through various performance and activities; and

·     Promote and advocate young artists and musicians to showcase their talent and generate positive connections in a creative environment.

COVID-19 Safety Plan

The applicant has provided a risk assessment inclusive of COVID-19 conditions. They have also advised that they will adhere to current and ongoing NSW Health Guidelines and include necessary hygiene and social distancing requirements.

Beneficiaries 

·     2,000 attendees throughout the day of the event;

·     Local businesses and suppliers contributing to the event; and

·     Local artists and performers.

Assessment 

Recommended for Funding - $7,800

The project aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 1 Creating Connection and meets the Corporate Sponsorship Program’s funding priorities.

 

The organisation has submitted a fee waiver request for use of CPAC venue, equipment and technical staff, a total to $2,2000. This amount has been deducted from the recommended funding.

 

Expected program outcomes 7.7.1 a), b), d); and e)

 

Matching Grants Program

 

The Matching Grants Program received one application which met the eligibility criteria and is recommended for funding as follows:

 

Applicant 

HelpMe Feed Foundation Ltd

Project 

HelpMe Feed maternal and child health support for CALD women

Amount Requested

$15,000

Total Project Cost

$115,000

Location

Online

Date

Ongoing

About the Applicant

The HelpMe Feed Foundation is a not-for-profit organisation that supports the health of babies and parents globally though the provision of information and support on feeding, and maternal and child health to new parents.

 

The program delivery partner, Karitane, provides an extensive range of child and maternal health programs focused on refugee and migrant families including home visits for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) families, along with postnatal depression and parental support.

Description 

Objectives:

This project provides information, support, participation, and empowerment to new parents and volunteer community coaches from diverse backgrounds in CALD communities. Health professionals from Karitane design and manage programs to support new parents through three interconnected pillars:

 

·     Individualised health care plans;

·     Evidence-based resources - video and .pdf guides (in CALD languages); and

·     CALD volunteer community coaches.

The HelpMe Feed Foundation provides an app, program, and coaching support for women when health professionals are not available through a unique community volunteering model.

 

CALD community coaches are recruited from the Liverpool LGA, trained to provide emotional support and reinforce health information via the app and its digital communication tools. Health professionals maintain oversight and visibility into the volunteer coaching. Community coaches offer support in relevant community languages, providing accurate and timely information to new parents in their first language.

 

The mobile phone app enables CALD women to be matched and participate as volunteer community coaches and receive support regardless of location, mobility, time commitment, language, or skill. Through the app, support is available to new parents 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

 

Outcomes:

·     An opportunity for local community members to be trained as volunteer community coaches;

·     Increased social connection and participation for new CALD parents at risk of increased social isolation; and

·     Improved access to evidence-based and tailored health information for new parents in Liverpool.

COVID-19 Safety Plan

The app and program are fully digitally delivered and would not require any adjustments to its current format in the event of a COVID-19 outbreak.

Beneficiaries 

·     30 community volunteers from Liverpool trained as community coaches; and

·     Local community members who access the app and program.

Assessment 

Recommended for Funding - $15,000

The project aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 1 Creating Connection and meets the Corporate Sponsorship Program’s funding priorities.

 

Expected program outcomes 7.6.1 a) and b).

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$100,000

$71,050

$7,800

$63,250

COMMUNITY GRANTS

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$102,000

$102,000

Nil

$102,000

MATCHING GRANTS

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$200,000

$200,000

$15,000

$185,000

SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT GRANTS*

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$75,000

$75,000

Nil

$75,000

COMBINED FUNDING BALANCE

Combined Budget

Combined Balance

Total recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$477,000

$448,050

$25,000

$423,500

* Sustainable Environment Grants funding is via a rate levy and is only eligible to be used for the Sustainable Environment Grants Program.

Environment

Support schools and community groups to play an active role in reducing their impact on the environment and implementing environmentally sustainable actions.

Social

Support community organisations and groups to deliver services.

Civic Leadership

Role model to applicants, residents, and general public COVID-19 safe practices and procedures when supporting funding requests.

Legislative

Local Government Act 1993 - s356.

Risk

Risk of supporting these activities is considered low. Applicants have provided information on their compliance with COVID-19 safety guidelines published by NSW Health.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.       Grants, Donations and Corporate Sponsorship Policy (Under separate cover) 

 


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Community & Culture Report

 

COM 03

Report back to Council - Racism Not Welcome campaign

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Celebrate diversity, promote inclusion and recognise heritage

File Ref

243078.2021

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Tina Bono - Acting Director Community & Culture

 

Executive Summary

 

At its meeting on 31 March 2021, Council resolved to:

 

1.    Note the recent, alarming rise of racism in our community;

 

2.    Receive further information about the “Racism Not Welcome” campaign and continue to encourage advocacy and promotion of the campaign in the local area;

 

3.    Join the NSW Anti-Racism Working Group, an initiative of the Local Government Multicultural Workers’ Network; and

4.    Receive a report with recommendations on how the campaign can be implemented.

 

A study by the Australian National University (ANU) in November 2020, found that incidents of racial vilification and attacks, particularly against people of Asian descent, rose sharply in 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The virus’ origin from China was found to be the likely motive of these racist attacks.

 

However, recent discussion and engagement with local community organisations including Western Sydney Migrant Resource Centre (WSMRC), Navitas Liverpool, MTC Australia, and TAFE NSW has found that there have not been any identified or known incidents of racial vilification or attacks reported by these community groups as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Council officers have conducted further research into the ‘Racism Not Welcome” campaign, an initiative of the Inner West Multicultural Network. The campaign aims to organise collective action to address the issue of racism in the local community. Currently, this is achieved through the installation of street signs which carry the message “Racism Not Welcome” in key community locations. 

Through implementing this resolution, Council has become a member of the NSW Anti-Racism Working Group, an initiative of the NSW Local Government Multicultural Network, of which Council is a member. Meeting monthly, the working group provides workers a safe space to discuss anti-racism and strategies.

 

Council’s focus in preventing racism and discrimination has been to invest in building social capital through systems and networks; enhancing the community’s capacity and resilience through projects and the provision of services; and sharing positive stories and messages which encourage acceptance and inclusion.  The experience of co-operation in response to Covid underscores the efficacy of this approach.

 

A general consensus amongst relevant community-based organisations appears to suggest the installation of “Racism Not Welcome” signs is likely to detract from the positive messages of celebrating diversity and inclusion through Council, and others’ initiatives. It is recommended therefore that Council does not join the ‘Racism Not Welcome’ campaign; rather, continues to work collaboratively on positive community messaging, programs and activities that highlight Liverpool’s uniqueness and cultural diversity.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

 

REPORT

 

Racism Not Welcome Campaign

 

Campaign background

 

The “Racism Not Welcome” campaign was initiated in 2020 by Inner West Multicultural Network and supported by Inner West Council. The campaign aims to organise collective action in addressing the issue of racism within the local community. The initial vision of a protest rally including guest speakers was inhibited by the COVID-19 outbreak and could not proceed as planned.

 

Following consultation with the local community, the campaign shifted focus to the development of street signage to be installed across the Inner West LGA. The signs feature the slogan “Racism Not Welcome” and have been installed in various high-traffic locations to raise awareness with the broader community. Signs were installed at 40 separate locations throughout the Inner West LGA, at a cost of approximately $100 per sign.

 

Considering this campaign was initiated in 2020, there is insufficient data available to indicate whether the campaign has had a positive impact or otherwise.

 

The Liverpool Story

 

The significant cultural diversity of Liverpool LGA has been the driving factor for responding to any racial concerns. Council’s approach is combined with that of the community services sector in Liverpool, to share positive stories and messages which encourage acceptance and inclusion; and build on community’s capacity and resilience. This approach is also mirrored to that of Multicultural NSW, who highlight community resilience, building sector capability and a shared sense of value as key priorities of their Strategic Plan 2021 – 2025.

 

Council Programs and Initiatives Addressing Racism

 

Council participates in several key initiatives which aim to prevent and identify racist activities, as well as to encourage social cohesion and inclusion in Liverpool. These include:

·     Co-convening the Liverpool Refugee and Migrant Interagency (LRMI) in partnership with Western Sydney Migrant Resource Centre (WSMRC). This interagency is an opportunity for networking, information-sharing, and discussion of issues related to refugees and migrants in the Liverpool LGA for local services sector;

·     Participating in the Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA) Refugee Welcome Zone Leadership Group (RWZLG). As a member of the RWZLG, Council participates in advocacy and policy discussions which aim to improve and recognise the importance of local government in the National Settlement Framework;

·     Membership of the Welcoming Cities Network, which supports Council to participate in broader initiatives and development of strategies that encourage unity, shared values and belonging amongst all community members;

·     Facilitating the Conversation Café at Liverpool City Library. This program provides an opportunity for community members who would like to practice and improve their English-speaking skills in a social group setting;

·     Facilitating the National Community Hubs Program as the Support Agency of three community hubs in Liverpool. The program supports migrant and refugee families, particularly mothers with young children, to bridge the gap between migrants and the wider community. Hubs connect women with schools, peers, and local organisations providing health, education, and support;

·     Facilitating the implementation of Liverpool’s Declaration of Cultural and Religious Harmony, which promotes peace and harmony among communities from different cultural and religious backgrounds, within the LGA and broader society;

·     Collaborating with local community organisations in the provision of programs and initiatives which foster community engagement, cohesion and capacity-building for local members;

·     Delivery of festivals, community engagement programs and initiatives which celebrate the contribution of residents from refugee and migrant backgrounds. These include Refugee Week, Harmony Day and Liverpool on a Roll (Council’s premier multicultural food festival);

·     Resolving to establish the Liverpool Multicultural Park, to celebrate and acknowledge the contributions made by our refugee and migrant communities;

·     Facilitating the Language Aide Program, which strengthens the bilingual skills of staff to deliver effective customer service for culturally diverse communities wanting to access information and services. Language Aides are available in a range of languages which reflect the primary demographics of Liverpool including Arabic, Cantonese, Hindi, Mandarin, Serbian, Spanish and Vietnamese;

·     Providing grants and sponsorship funding to community groups to deliver significant cultural days and community events to celebrate culture and art; and

·     Promotional activities such as the recent delivery of a new fleet of waste compactor trucks which carry community messaging. One such message, “Celebrating our Cultural Diversity” acknowledges Liverpool’s strong connection to refugee and migrant communities. Council has also installed a Harmony Day mural on the Library wall above the Council Chambers to reflect the message of Harmony Day 2021 ‘Everyone Belongs’ in various community languages as a constant reminder of Council’s commitment to diversity and social cohesion in Liverpool.

 

Council staff are currently investigating an education and capacity building program in partnership with WSMRC and educational providers, to roll out a community training and awareness program in Liverpool. Furthermore, Council is working with the University of Western Sydney’s Challenging Racism Project to investigate local partnership opportunities.

 

NSW Anti-Racism Working Group

 

Council has joined the NSW Anti-Racism Working Group, an initiative of the NSW Local Government Multicultural Network (LGMN), of which Council is also a member. The LGMN, convened by Cumberland City Council and supported by Local Government NSW (LGNSW) brings together local governments to collaborate on issues facing refugee and migrant communities.

 

The Anti-Racism Working Group was established to provide workers a safe space to discuss anti-racism issues and concerns. The NSW Anti-Racism Working Group objectives include:

·     Identify emerging concerns around racism, current strategies, their effectiveness and gaps;

·     Identify, provide and promote anti-racism training, education opportunities and resources to organisations, groups and the wider community;

·     Explore partnership and funding opportunities and coalition building with key organisations and agencies including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities;

·     Identify the roles (influence, control and interest) of local government bodies in addressing racism and develop short, medium and long term strategies;

·     Explore local governments’ and other organisations’ strengths in anti-racism strategies, develop and implement an action plan, and learn from other marginalised communities on actions to create social change (such as disability action plans and the same-sex marriage equality campaign);

·     Research incidents of racism and relevant policy in different LGAs to develop local actions;

·     Develop and collaborate on youth-specific anti-racism initiatives; and

·     Seek out funding opportunities that encourage collaboration between partners and support these objectives.

 

NSW Anti-Racism Working Group Racial Literacy Starter Toolkit

 

An initiative of the NSW Anti-Racism Working Group, the Racial Literacy Starter Toolkit was developed by University of Technology Sydney in April 2021 to encourage self-awareness and self-learning regarding racial literacy. The Toolkit provides information and resources which encourage discussion and awareness of racism-related issues. The Toolkit discusses key concepts which support the management of racism including:

·     What is racism;

·     Types of racism;

·     Racism in the workplace;

·     Internalised racism;

·     Racism in Australia; and

·     Allies and Accomplices.

 

As members of the Anti-Racism Working Group, Council has access to share and promote this resource through Council networks such as the Liverpool Refugee and Migrant Interagency (LRMI), in order to encourage and support inclusion and harmony. Council’s ongoing participation in this Working Group will further support its work in addressing racism through positive community messaging and facilitate access to services and programs that highlight Liverpool’s strength as a multicultural community.

 

Conclusion

 

Installation of “Racism Not Welcome” signs are likely to take away from the positive message of celebrating diversity and inclusion through Council initiatives. A focus on building capacity and resilience is mirrored in the approach of Multicultural NSW, who highlight community resilience, building sector capability, and a shared sense of value as key priorities of their Strategic Plan 2021 – 2025. On a local level, key agencies were consulted, which emphasised positive messaging and capacity building as the most effective approach in Liverpool.

 

It is recommended that Council does not join the ‘Racism Not Welcome’ campaign; and continue to work collaboratively on positive community messaging, programs and activities that highlight Liverpool’s uniqueness and cultural diversity.

 

Further, it is also recommended Council promote the Racial Literacy Toolkit to community organisations and groups. This Toolkit will build on Council’s approach of capacity building, awareness raising and promoting inclusion and cohesion.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Budget will be required if Council resolved to join the ‘Racism Not Welcome’ campaign.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Promote community harmony and address discrimination.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Actively advocate for federal and state government support, funding and services.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

Risk

The risk associated with this report is deemed low.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         NSW Anti-Racism Working Group Racial Literacy Toolkit


1

COM 03

Report back to Council - Racism Not Welcome campaign

Attachment 1

NSW Anti-Racism Working Group Racial Literacy Toolkit

 

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1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Corporate Services Report

 

CORP 01

Investment Report July 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Seek efficient and innovative methods to manage our resources

File Ref

216619.2021

Report By

Chi Nguyen - Accountant - Investments & Treasury Management

Approved By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer

 

Executive Summary

 

This report details Council’s investment portfolio and its performance for the month ended 31st July 2021:

·     Council held investments with a market value of $338 million.

·     The economic environment globally, including Australia, suffered significantly from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020. The market value of Council’s investment in Floating Rate Notes (FRN) has since improved;

·     RBA has decided to lower the cash rate to 0.10% with an indication to keep it at this level for next three years. This will have significant impact on Council’s interest earnings;

·     The portfolio yield was 109 basis points above the AusBond Bank Bill index;

 

AusBond Bank Bill Index (ABBI)

Benchmark

0.05%

Portfolio yield

1.14%

Performance above benchmarks

1.09%

 

·     Return on investment was $35k lower than the original budget. This includes $95k capital gain on FRN’s;

·     Council’s investment advisor, Amicus Advisory, has completed its review of Emerald Mortgage Backed Securities and recommends Council continue to hold its investments in the “Class A” and both “Class C” securities given current poor market pricing. MBS Securities are now not rated;

·     Council’s investments and reporting obligations fully complied with the requirements of section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993 and clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005;

·     Council’s portfolio also fully complied with limits set out in its current Investment Policy; and

·     Council is committed to NSW TCorp’s balanced investment framework and held 17.71% of its portfolio in ADI’s rated BBB and below.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

REPORT

 

Clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the Responsible Accounting Officer must provide Council with a written report setting out details of all money that Council has invested under section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Council’s Portfolio

 

At 31st July 2021, Council held investments with a market value of $338 million. Council’s investment register detailing all its investments is provided as an attachment to this report. In summary, Council’s portfolio consisted of investments in:

 

 

 

The ratio of market value compared to face value of various debt securities is shown in the table below.

 

Asset Class

Jul-21

Jun-21

Senior Debts (FRN's ,TCD's & FRB)*

101.34%

101.27%

MBS (Reverse Mortgage Backed Securities)

72.34%

71.06%

T-Corp Unit Trusts

103.18%

103.17%

 

*Definition of terms

 

·      Transferrable Certificate of Deposit (TCD) - security issued with the same characteristics as a Term Deposit however it can be sold back (transferred) into the market prior to maturity. A floating TCD pays a coupon linked to a variable benchmark (90 days BBSW).

·      Fixed Rate Bond (FRB) – returns Fixed Coupon (interest) Rate and is tradeable before maturity.

·    Floating Rate Note (FRN) - returns an aggregate of a fixed margin and a variable benchmark (usually BBSW).

 

The economic environment globally, including Australia, suffered significantly from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in March. The market value of Council’s investment in FRN’s has since improved. Council has sufficient funds in its current account and has no plans at this stage to sell off any of its FRN’s to meet its short-term cashflow requirements.

 

Council is fully compliant with the requirements of the Ministerial Investment Order including the grandfathering provisions. The grandfathering provisions state that Council may continue to hold to maturity, redeem or sell investments that comply with previous Ministerial Investment Orders. Any new investments must comply with the most recent Order. Council continues to closely monitor the investments in its portfolio to ensure continued compliance and minimal exposure to risk.

 

Council is committed to NSW TCorp’s balanced investment framework and held 17.71% of its portfolio in ADI’s rated BBB and below.

 

Emerald – Mortgaged Backed Securities

 

Council’s new investment advisor, Amicus Advisory, was asked on appointment to review Council’s investments in “grandfathered” mortgage backed securities. Amicus has completed its review and recommends Council continue to hold its investments in the “Class A” and both “Class C” securities given current poor market pricing. Notwithstanding this recommendation, Amicus has assessed that both “Class C” securities are likely to eventually default. However, Council will continue to receive interest up until default which is likely to be many years away. Fitch Rating Agency has decided to withdraw its rating on mortgage backed securities and as a result, Council investments in these securities are now classed non-rated.

 


 

Portfolio Maturity Profile

 

The table below shows the percentage of funds invested at different durations to maturity.

 

 

 

Market Value by Issuer and Institution Policy limit as per Investment Policy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overall Portfolio Credit Framework compliance to Investment Policy

 

 

 

Portfolio performance against relevant market benchmark.

 

Council’s Investment Policy prescribes the AusBond Bank Bill Index (ABBI) as a benchmark to measure return on cash and fixed interest securities. The ABBI represents the average daily yield of a parcel of bank bills. Historically there has been a positive correlation between changes in the cash rate and the resulting impact on the ABBI benchmark.

 

The portfolio yield to 31st July 2021 exceeded the AusBond Bank Bill index by 109 basis points (1.14% against 0.05%)

 

Council portfolio continues to perform at above benchmark rates despite ongoing margin contraction and significantly lower market term deposit yields. Comparative yields for the previous months are charted below:

 

 

 

Performance of Portfolio Returns against Budget

 

Council’s investment income for July 2021 is $35k lower than the original budget. This includes $95k capital gain on FRN’s.

 

 

 

Investment Portfolio at a Glance

 

 

Portfolio Performance

MCWB01114_0000[1]

The portfolio yield to 31st July 2021 exceeded the AusBond Bank Bill index by 109 basis points (1.14% against 0.05%).

Annual Income vs. Budget

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Council’s investment interest income is $35k lower than the original budget as at 31st July 2021 and will be closely monitored.

 

Investment Policy Compliance

 

Legislative Requirements

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Portfolio Credit Rating Limit

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Institutional Exposure Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Overall Portfolio Credit Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Term to Maturity Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

 

 

 

Economic Outlook – Reserve Bank of Australia

 

The Reserve Bank has left the official cash rate on hold at 0.10 per cent in its meeting on 3rd August 2021.The current 0.10 per cent cash rate is at a historically low level and impacts returns on investment.

 

Certificate of Responsible Accounting Officer

 

The Chief Financial Officer, as Responsible Accounting Officer, certifies that the investments listed in the attached report have been made in accordance with section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 and Council’s Investment Policy at the time of their placement. The previous investments are covered by the grandfathering clauses of the current investment guidelines issued by the Minister for Local Government.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Council’s investment interest income is $35k lower than the original budget as at 31st July 2021 and will be closely monitored.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Council is fully compliant with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1993 – Investment Order (authorized investments) and with reporting requirements under clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

Risk

The capital value and return on investment is subject to market risks. Investment limits prescribed in Council’s policy framework is aimed to mitigate these risks.

Market interest is expected to stay at its lowest rate for a long period and will continue to put pressure on Council’s budget.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Investment Portfolio July 2021  


1

CORP 01

Investment Report July 2021

Attachment 1

Investment Portfolio July 2021

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Corporate Services Report

 

CORP 02

Biannual Progress Report - June 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

248229.2021

Report By

Hiba Soueid - Manager Corporate Strategy and Performance

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director Corporate Services

 

Executive Summary

 

The Biannual Progress Report provides an overview of Council’s performance against the Principal Activities that were scheduled for the January to June 2021 period. This is reported against the Delivery Program 2017-2022 and Operational Plan 2020-2021.

 

This is the second progress report for 2020-2021 and has been prepared in accordance with the Office of Local Government Integrated Planning and Reporting Guidelines and Section 404 (5) of the Local Government Act (1993).

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council notes and receives the Biannual Progress Report which outlines the progress of Principal Activities detailed in the Delivery Program 2017-2022 and Operational Plan 2020-2021.

 

 

REPORT

 

On 26 April 2017, Council adopted the Community Strategic Plan, Our Home, Liverpool 2027Our Home, Liverpool 2027 outlines the community’s vision and priorities for Liverpool. The Plan was developed after extensive engagement with the community and contains four directions for the future of Liverpool. These directions are underpinned by the quadruple bottom line and guide Council’s operations and service delivery for the next ten years.

 

Council’s Delivery Program 2017-2022 and Operational Plan and Budget 2020-2021 outline Council’s commitment to the community. The combined document details 103 Principal Activities that Council has committed to delivering.

 

Section 404 (5) of the Local Government Act (1993) requires the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) to ensure that a progress report is provided to Council at least every six months. It should include information and updates on the Principal Activities that have been detailed in the four-year Delivery Program. This allows Council and the public to monitor progress.

 

During the January to June 2021 reporting period, Council focused on assisting local businesses to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as continuing to engage with the community. The limitations on face-to-face engagement, and the ease of restrictions throughout the period, presented both challenges and opportunities to Council’s daily operations.

 

In response, Council assisted local businesses by introducing the Business Resilience Grants program initiative. This was one of the items endorsed by Council as part of its COVID-19 support package. The program received a positive response, with an overall $172,000 provided in financial support. With the ease of restrictions, Council reintroduced face-to-face community events in the form of the ‘Love Summer’ series of activations including Liverpool On a Roll, and the Seniors Week concert aimed at keeping the community connected and engaged. Council also continued to deliver major infrastructure works including the official opening of the world-class sports complex and recreational space - Cirillo Reserve, to support healthy and active lifestyles in the community. 

 

By the end of June 2021, 95% of Principal Activities in the Delivery Program and 2020-21 Operational Plan were on track or completed.

 

The attached report provides detailed information on each of the 103 Principal Activities detailed in the Delivery Program 2017-2022.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Governance

The Delivery Program and Operational Plan sets the direction for Council’s strategic agenda, including all economic, environmental, social and civic leadership requirements.

Legislation

The Delivery Program and Operational Plan have been developed in line with the Local Government Act 1993. 

In particular Section 404 (5) of the Local Government Act states:

“The general manager must ensure that regular progress reports are provided to the council reporting as to its progress with respect to the principal activities detailed in its delivery program. Progress reports must be provided at least every 6 months.”

Risk

The risk is deemed to be High. Failure to provide regular progress reports to the council with respect to the principal activities detailed in its delivery program at least every 6 months may result in non-compliance with the above legislation and may result in enforceable action by the Office of Local Government, Planning Policy.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Biannual Progress Report - January to June 2021 (Under separate cover)  


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Corporate Services Report

 

CORP 03

Alteration to Council Meeting dates for remainder of 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

249068.2021

Report By

George Georgakis - Manager Council and Executive Services

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director Corporate Services

 

Executive Summary

 

The local government elections in NSW which were scheduled to be held on 4 September 2021 have been postponed by three months due to Covid-19 restrictions and will now be held on 4 December 2021. This report proposes alterations to Council’s meeting dates for 2021 as a result of that change. A further report will be submitted to the October 2021 Council meeting with proposed Council meeting dates for 2022.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Make the following changes to its Council meeting cycle for 2021:

i.      Hold a Council meeting in the last Wednesday of September, being 29 September 2021;

ii.     Change the date of the October meeting (currently scheduled for 20 October 2021), to the last Wednesday in October being 27 October 2021;

iii.    Change the date of the November meeting (currently scheduled for 17 November 2021) to the last Wednesday in November being 24 November 2021; and

iv.    Remove the meeting scheduled for 15 December 2021 as this will be after the elections and prior to any declaration of the new Council.

 

2.    Receive a further report at the October 2021 Council meeting with proposed Council meeting dates for 2022.

 


 

REPORT

 

Section 365 of the Local Government Act 1993 stipulates that Councils must meet at least 10 times per year, each time in a different month. Section 366 of the Act makes provision for additional meetings to be called if necessary.

 

Council at its meeting in November 2020 adopted its meeting dates for 2021 which is shown below:

 

Table 1 – Council meeting dates 2021 (adopted by Council in November 2020)

Meeting date

Comments

3 February 2021

First meeting after January break to deal with accumulated business.

24 February 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

31 March 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

28 April 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

26 May 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

30 June 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

28 July 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

25 August 2021

Last Wednesday of the month.

No meeting in September due to Local Government Elections

 

20 October 2021

First meeting of the new Council.

17 November 2021

Third Wednesday of the month.

15 December 2021

Third Wednesday of the month.

 

With the local government elections postponed by three months to 4 December 2021 and the current term of Council extended by that period, it is recommended that the following changes be made to the Council meeting dates for 2021:

i.     Hold a Council meeting in the last Wednesday of September, being 29 September 2021;

ii.     Change the date of the October meeting (currently scheduled for 20 October 2021), to the last Wednesday in October being 27 October 2021;

iii.    Change the date of the November meeting (currently scheduled for 17 November 2021) to the last Wednesday in November being 24 November 2021; and

iv.   Remove the meeting scheduled for 15 December as this will be after the elections and prior to any declaration of the new Council.

 

A further report will be submitted to the October 2021 Council meeting with proposed Council meeting dates for 2022. That report will also outline a proposed timeframe for the Councillor Induction Program for the new Council.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

Section 365 and 366 of the Local Government Act 1993.

Risk

The risk is deemed to be low and is considered to be within Council’s risk appetite.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Corporate Services Report

 

CORP 04

Amendment to Council's Investment Policy

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Seek efficient and innovative methods to manage our resources

File Ref

255741.2021

Report By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director Corporate Services

 

Executive Summary

 

Council’s Investment policy is the main instrument guiding Council’s investment decisions and requires review annually or more frequently depending on legislative changes or in response to changes in market conditions.

 

The current version of Council Investment Policy was adopted on 25 April 2020 and is due for review.

 

This report seeks a council resolution to adopt minor amendments identified.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts the amended Investment Policy.

 

 

REPORT

 

Council’s Investment policy is the main instrument guiding Council’s investment decisions and requires a review annually or more frequently depending on legislative changes or Council’s positioning to market conditions.

 

This report seeks a council resolution to adopt minor amendments identified. Amongst other things, Council seeks to extend the Policy review period to 2 years. Notwithstanding this and in line with the amended Policy, if changes are required earlier than the review period, this will be brought to Council as required.

 

The Policy has also been amended to address duplications within the Policy and references made which now reflect the exchanges and indices currently used by Council. 

 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

The changes recommended will allow Council to reduce its risk exposure and update the policy in view of the current market conditions.

Environment

The environmental and sustainability considerations are included in the policy.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993 permits Council to invest funds.

Risk

The investment risk management framework is included in the policy

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Draft Amended Investment Policy 2021 (Under separate cover)  


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Corporate Services Report

 

CORP 05

Postponement of Council Elections, Deputy Mayor and Council Committees

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

256287.2021

Report By

George Georgakis - Manager Council and Executive Services

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director Corporate Services

 

Executive Summary

 

Council at its meeting in September 2020 resolved to appoint Councillor Hadid to the position of Deputy Mayor for the term 30 September 2020 to 4 September 2021. With the local government elections now postponed by three months to 4 December 2021, this report presents options for Council’s consideration with regards to the position of Deputy Mayor. The report also recommends that the current Councillor representatives appointed to Council Committees, remain in place until the end of this Council term.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council;

 

1.    Note that Councillor Hadid’s term as Deputy Mayor will cease on 4 September 2021;

 

2.    Determine whether it wishes to conduct an election for the position of Deputy Mayor for the period from 5 September 2021 – 4 December 2021, and if so, whether the election is to be conducted at the 25 August 2021 Council meeting or the September 2021 Council meeting; and

 

3.    Notes that the current Councillor representatives appointed to Council Committees at the 30 September 2020 meeting, remain in place until the end of this Council term.

 

REPORT

 

1.  Deputy Mayor

 

Council at its meeting in September 2020 resolved to appoint Councillor Hadid to the position of Deputy Mayor for the term 30 September 2020 to 4 September 2021. With the local government elections now postponed by three months to 4 December 2021, this report presents options for Council’s consideration with regard to the position of Deputy Mayor.

Below is an extract from page 6 of the attached document from the Office of Local Government on the “Postponement of the 2021 local government elections, frequently asked questions”:

 

What does the postponement of the elections mean for deputy mayors?

 

Deputy Mayors may be elected for the mayoral term or a shorter term. Deputy Mayors hold their office for the term specified by the Council’s resolution. If a Deputy Mayor’s term expires before election day on 4 December 2021, an election may need to be held for Deputy Mayor. It should be noted however, that Councils are not required under the Act to have a Deputy Mayor. 

 

As Councillor Hadid’s term as Deputy Mayor will cease after 4 September 2021, the Office of Local Government was consulted on the options available to Council.

 

The options are:

 

i.     Do nothing

 

Section 231 of the Local Government Act 1993 provides that:

“(1) The Councillors may elect a person from among their number to be the deputy mayor.

 (2)  The person may be elected for the mayoral term or a shorter term”.

 

Councils are not required under the Local Government Act 1993 to have a Deputy Mayor, so can choose to not have a Deputy Mayor after 4 September 2021 until the first meeting of the new Council, following which an election for the Deputy Mayor can be held.

 

ii.    Conduct an election for the Deputy Mayor

 

Should Council resolve to appoint a Deputy Mayor until the local government elections on 4 December 2021, it could either:

a.    Conduct the election for the Deputy Mayor at the 25 August Council meeting, with the period to commence from 5 September 2021 until 4 December 2021; or

b.    Conduct the election for the Deputy Mayor as part of the September 2021 Council meeting agenda (scheduled for Wednesday 29 September 2021). Note, if this option is chosen, it would mean there is no Deputy Mayor in place from 5 September until 29 September 2021 (which is the date of the meeting proposed for September).

 

Note, Schedule 7 Clause 394 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 provides that:

“Nominations for the Deputy Mayor must be in writing signed by at least two Councillors, one of whom may be the nominee. The nominee must consent in writing to the nomination”.

 

Should Council resolve to conduct the election of Deputy Mayor (for the 4/9/2021 – 4/12/2021 period) at the August Council meeting, any completed and signed nomination forms would be required to be emailed to the Returning Officer prior to or during the meeting. A nomination form is attached to this report. The Chief Executive Officer is the Returning Officer for the election of Deputy Mayor.

 

In the event that there is only one candidate, that Councillor will be appointed Deputy Mayor.

Schedule 7 Clause 394 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 also provides that if more than one Councillor is nominated, the Council is to resolve whether the election is to proceed by preferential ballot, by ordinary ballot, or by open voting.

 

As the Council meeting will be conducted online via Microsoft Teams, if Council resolves to conduct an election for the position of Deputy Mayor, it will also need to resolve to conduct the election of Deputy Mayor by open voting.

 

2.  Council Committees

 

Council at its meeting on 30 September 2020 appointed Councillor representatives to its Council Committees for the period to September 2021. It is recommended that the current Councillor representatives remain in place until the end of this Council term.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

Section 231 of the Local Government Act 1993.

Risk

The risk is deemed to be low and is considered to be within Council’s risk appetite.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Nomination Form - Deputy Mayor

2.         Postponement of the 2021 local government elections, frequently asked questions


1

CORP 05

Postponement of Council Elections, Deputy Mayor and Council Committees

Attachment 1

Nomination Form - Deputy Mayor

 

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1

CORP 05

Postponement of Council Elections, Deputy Mayor and Council Committees

Attachment 2

Postponement of the 2021 local government elections, frequently asked questions

 

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1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Infrastructure & Environment Report

 

INF 01

2020-21 Capital Works Carryover of Projects

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

245587.2021

Report By

Raj Autar - Director Infrastructure & Environment

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director Corporate Services

 

Executive Summary

 

Council, at its meeting held on 24 June 2020, adopted a budget as part of the 2020-21 Operational Plan including Council’s Capital Works budget. Quarterly program reviews were undertaken in September 2020, December 2020 and March 2021. The revised budget across Council was $152,511,192.

 

This report identifies works that need to be carried over to the 2021-22 Program Year to enable Council to achieve the objectives of the 2020-21 Operational Plan. The projects proposed for carryover are attached as Attachment 1 with the associated budget amount of $19,138,615.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council approves the works and services listed in Attachment 1 with a remaining budget of $19,138,615 to be carried over from the 2020-21 Program Year to the 2021-22 Program Year.

 

REPORT

 

A list of projects recommended to be carried over has been provided as Attachment 1. Justifications for the carryovers, which amount to 12% of the total capital works budget, are included in this attachment as well.

 

In accordance with Clause 211 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, Council approval is required to carryover these funds and continue those projects in 2021-22.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

There are no additional financial implications due to carryovers as all projects are fully funded.

 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Deliver and maintain a range of transport, building and open space related infrastructure.

Environment

Deliver infrastructure that is environmentally friendly and sustainability focused.


Social

Promote active lifestyle by providing relevant public infrastructure.

Provide safe and accessible transport facilities.

Deliver high quality services for children and their families.


Civic Leadership

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

Clause 211 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 applies.

Risk

The carryover is necessary to allow contractor payments to be made for ongoing works.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         2020-21 Carryovers


1

INF 01

2020-21 Capital Works Carryover of Projects

Attachment 1

2020-21 Carryovers

 

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1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Infrastructure & Environment Report

 

INF 02

Impact of COVID on current contracts

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

251380.2021

Report By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer

Approved By

Raj Autar - Director Infrastructure & Environment

 

Executive Summary

 

Council, at its meeting held on 28 July 2021, resolved that a report be presented to the August 2021 Council meeting detailing all capital expenditure which has a contract value of more than $500,000, excluding any projects fully funded by Section 7.11 Contributions, or State or Federal grants. Council further resolved that the report include the following information:

a)    The project/spend;

b)    Importance of the project/spend; and

c)    Whether a force majeure clause is included in the contract.

 

Council’s capital works programs are primarily driven by the need to ensure that the full range of Council services that rely on proper functioning infrastructure can continue to be provided. Consequently, the following broad categories of works forms the backbone of Council’s capital works program and budget:

 

1.    Asset restoration and renewal - involves the progressive replacement of assets that have deteriorated beyond the scope of normal maintenance. These works are necessary to ensure public safety and service continuity, and includes road pavement reconstruction, major building repairs and bridge repairs;

 

2.    Enhancement and expansion activities - includes upgrades and provision of new assets to address capacity constraints, meet new demand from new urban release areas or to meet Council’s strategic objectives e.g. the Liverpool Civic Place;

 

3.    IT Infrastructure upgrades - introduction and use of appropriate technology to support Council’s business process in a way that facilitates delivery of services that best meet community needs and the priorities of Council; and

 

4.    Plant and Equipment Purchase - to support the operation and maintenance of Council’s extensive network of built and natural assets in the most effective way.

In consideration of the above Council decision, this report presents only those current contracts that are funded through Council’s general revenue.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

REPORT

 

1.   Capital contracts expenditure and budgets

The following table provides information relating to current contracts for the following categories of Council’s capital projects, with corresponding justification for the expenditure:

·           Purchase of plant and equipment;

·           Construction of Liverpool Civic Place;

·           Asset renewal and restoration; and

·           Asset enhancements and upgrades.

 

Project Description - only general fund contact value > $500,000.

Budget

Need and importance of project

City Presentation

$3,082,505

 

Major Plant Purchase

$3,082,505

Budget has been committed and awaiting delivery of essential plant and equipment to progressively replace ageing plant.

Economy & Commercial Development

$81,770,473

 

Construction of Liverpool Civic Place

$81,170,473

To meet community demand for accessible facilities.

Infrastructure & Environment

$5,417,640

 

Road Resurfacing Program Rejuvenation

$500,000

For public safety and improved accessibility.

Road Resurfacing Program Programmed Patching

$900,000

For public safety and improved accessibility.

Stante Reserve - Local Park Construction

$600,000

To improve liveability of new urban release areas and to promote healthy lifestyles.

Wolstenholme Avenue, Greendale

$500,000

For public safety and improved accessibility.

Contaminated Lands - waste remediation

$700,000

For public health and safety, as well as legislative compliance.

Mill Road, Liverpool - Speed to Highway

$567,600

For public safety and improved accessibility.

Bellfield Road, Rossmore - Start Seal to May

$500,000

For public safety and improved accessibility.

Phase 1 Urban Forest Strategy - Greening City Tree planting

$550,040

For public safety and improved accessibility.

Spencer Road, Cecil Hills - Frederick to Gabriella

$600,000

For public safety and improved accessibility.

Total

$90,270,618

 

.

2.   Force Majeure

A force majeure clause in contracts relieves a party from performing its contractual obligations due to an event outside the reasonable control of the affected party. Common force majeure events include; 'acts of God', 'natural disasters', 'government action or interference', 'labour shortages', 'national emergencies' and 'acts of war'.

 

Most of Council’s current contracts have provisions written into them regarding circumstances beyond the reasonable control of a party, and having regard to past experience, have been amended to include pandemics, epidemics, government shutdowns, State or Federal public health orders, etc.

 

While the older contracts may not have these provisions, the General Conditions of Contract (AS2124) addresses this eventuality by allowing Termination by Frustration, whereby without fault of either party, the contractual obligations are incapable of being performed due to an unforeseen event (or events). Under this scenario, the parties can be discharged from their agreement. Notwithstanding, it does not prevent Council and the contractor mutually agreeing to amend the contract or accept that a force majeure event exists.

 

The need for a force majeure clause or termination clause adds protection for both parties, and not just Council. There may be obligations that Council may not be able to perform while the force majeure event continues, and such a clause prevents the contractor from making a claim against Council. The overall benefit of having a force majeure clause is to ensure that the obligations of the parties will be postponed until the end of the force majeure event, avoiding any breach and allowing the contractual obligations to be satisfied at a later date. It prevents a party from being in breach of the contract and having to pay damages if circumstances beyond their control prevents them from performing their side of the contract.

 

The spread of COVID-19 does not mean that a force majeure clause will be operative or that a contract will be frustrated. Parties will need to consider the specific impacts COVID-19 is having on the performance of obligations in the context of their contract.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Deliver high quality services for children and their families.


Civic Leadership

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

General Conditions of Contract (AS2124)

Risk

The risk is deemed to be Low.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Infrastructure & Environment Report

 

INF 03

Monitoring and Managing Sustainability Outcomes

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Encourage sustainability, energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy

File Ref

253443.2021

Report By

Michael Zengovski - Manager City Environment

Approved By

Raj Autar - Director Infrastructure & Environment

 

Executive Summary

 

Council, at its meeting held on 26 August 2020, resolved to trial a partnership with the ClimateClever program for 12 months and to encourage schools, business and households to become involved.

 

The ClimateClever program is a resource that enables users to measure and monitor electricity, gas and water consumption. The program has been reviewed to determine whether promoting it to the community would add value to Council’s current strategic approach to climate change.

 

A Climate Action Plan is currently being developed to lead a strategic approach to Council’s response to climate change. Council acknowledges the importance of monitoring electricity, gas and water consumption across the LGA to inform initiatives to reduce emissions and to track progress.  Various resources are currently utilised to monitor consumption, including the Resilient Sydney Platform and audits of Council’s highest consuming facilities. 

 

This report recommends that Council does not proceed with the trial of the ClimateClever partnership at this time.  The Climate Action Plan will identify optimal tracking tools to assist Council meet sustainability goals included in Our Home, Liverpool 2027.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Does not proceed with the trial of the ClimateClever partnership at this time.

 

 

 

 

2.    Continues to progress the development of the Climate Action Plan to lead a strategic approach to Council’s response to climate change and identify measures to reduce emissions.  Consideration can be given to trialling the partnership, or an equivalent service at a later date, if it is determined that it would add value to the implementation phase of the Climate Action Plan.

 

REPORT

 

1.     Background

 

The ClimateClever program estimates carbon footprints based on electricity, gas, water and waste parameters.  It identifies potential actions that can reduce carbon footprints.  Platforms have been developed for schools, businesses and households.  The program has been reviewed to determine whether promoting it to the community would add value to Council’s approach to climate change related matters. 

 

A Climate Action Plan is currently being developed by Council to guide the delivery of improved environmental outcomes.  It will provide a strategic approach to sustainability initiatives including emission and water use reductions across Council’s operations and the broader community.

 

2.   Climate Action Plan

 

The Climate Action Plan currently being prepared by Council responds to sustainability goals included in Our Home, Liverpool 2027 such as increased energy efficiency and use of renewable energy.  The Plan will build on existing projects and programs identified by Council, the community and NSW State Government to deliver robust economic and environmental benefits through resource efficiency, decreased emissions, improved liveability and other sustainability initiatives.  It will prescribe priority actions to ensure that Council positions itself as a sustainability leader.  

 

Monitoring will be an important component of the implementation of the Climate Action Plan to ensure that the identified actions are driving improved outcomes.  The Plan will include the identification of optimal tracking tools to ensure accurate monitoring.

 

3.   Monitoring Platforms and Community Resources

 

Council has a contract in place with Azility to measure and track energy use in Council’s buildings.  The information provided by Azility has assisted Council to monitor energy and water consumption trends and identify initiatives to reduce consumption.  Energy audits have also been completed for Council’s highest consuming facilities to identify energy reduction projects that offer the most cost-effective benefit.

 

The Resilient Sydney Platform is also available to track community emissions across various sectors within the LGA.  The information available from this Platform is currently used by Council to gain an understanding of trends and better plan for future communities. It is a valuable resource to help inform the development of future strategies and initiatives to reduce emissions.

 

There are also other existing energy saving programs available to the community, such as Endeavour Energy’s Household Energy HomeSaver program.  This free program offers advice to customers on ways to manage their energy usage and reduce the cost of their electricity bills.

 

Council raises the community’s awareness of sustainability and environmental initiatives through its Sustaining Liverpool newsletters. Through the newsletters, Council has provided information regarding the installation of solar photo voltaic (PV) systems in homes and promoted energy saving workshops, including the Endeavour Energy’s Household Energy HomeSaver program.

 

4.   ClimateClever Program

 

The ClimateClever program is relatively new, with platforms and tools being progressively released since 2018.   Community members can sign up to the program without a Council partnership being in place. However, they would receive a 50% discount on the ClimateClever apps if Council became a ClimateClever partner.  A standard partnership for Council costs $850 per year.

 

Council acknowledges the potential benefits of the ClimateClever program to enable users to measure and monitor electricity, gas and water consumption and report on actions taken to reduce carbon emissions. 

 

Given Council’s progress in the development of the Climate Action Plan, and the existing monitoring and community resources that are already available, it is considered that trialling the ClimateClever program would not add significant value to sustainability outcomes at this time.

 

5.   Conclusion

 

Based on the progress made on the development of a Climate Action Plan and availability of other resources such as monitoring tools, it is recommended that a ClimateClever partnership is not trialled at this time.  Consideration can be given to trialling the partnership, or an equivalent service, at a later date if it is determined that it would add value to the implementation phase of the Climate Action Plan.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Council has committed funds for the development of a Climate Action Plan.  Implementation of the Plan will focus on actions with a short payback period where possible.  Annual partnership costs would be incurred by the ClimateClever partnership.  There would be additional costs for community members to become involved with the ClimateClever program.

Environmental

A Climate Action Plan is currently being developed by Council to guide the delivery of improved environmental outcomes. It will identify priority actions for resource efficiency, decreased emissions, improved liveability and other sustainability initiatives.


Social

Community education and awareness will be considered during the development and implementation of the Climate Action Plan.


Civic Leadership

The development of a Climate Action Plan responds to sustainability goals included in Our Home, Liverpool 2027 such as increased energy efficiency and use of renewable energy.  The Plan will prescribe priority actions to ensure that Council positions itself as a sustainability leader.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations.

Risks

Climate change presents a significant risk to Council and the community.  The development of a strategic approach via a Climate Action Plan will help ensure that Council fulfils its responsibility in minimising associated risks.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Committee Reports

 

CTTE 01

Minutes of the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held on 24 May 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Celebrate diversity, promote inclusion and recognise heritage

File Ref

216433.2021

Report By

Thomas Wheeler - Heritage Officer

Approved By

David Smith - Acting Director Planning & Compliance

 

Executive Summary

 

This report is tabled to present the minutes of the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held on 24 May 2021.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives the minutes of the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held on 24 May 2021;

 

2.    Endorses the following recommendation of the Committee:

·      That Council thank and acknowledge the effort of Council’s Parks team in restoring the gardens at Collingwood House;

 

3.      Notes the following recommendations of the Committee which are operational matters and will be further investigated.

·      Council to consider allocating a section within Council with responsibility for the monitoring and maintenance of the Liverpool Pioneers Memorial Park website and to undertake all work necessary to ensure the website is operating as designed; and

·      Council considers the employment of trades people with traditional trade skills to in-house heritage building maintenance, with the aim of placing Liverpool City Council as a leader in heritage asset management.

 

REPORT

 

The minutes of the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held on 24 May 2021 are attached for the information of Council.

 

The minutes contain the following Committee recommendations:

 

·     The Liverpool Heritage Advisory Committee would like to thank and acknowledge the effort of Council’s Parks section in restoring the Gardens at Collingwood House.

 

Officer Comment:

 

The restoration of the gardens at Collingwood House would not be possible without the skill and dedication of staff within the Parks team. As well as undertaking their normal duties, a small team have worked to clean up the gardens, plant new trees and prepare the soil and new mulch.

 

·     Council to consider allocating a section within Council with responsibility for the monitoring and maintenance of the Liverpool Pioneers Memorial Park website and to undertake all work necessary to ensure the website is operating as designed.

 

Officer Comment:

 

The Heritage Advisory Committee raised concerns with the condition and management of the Liverpool Pioneers Memorial Park website which was developed as a part of the last phase of reinstatement works. Council will review the website, including for its ongoing maintenance, updating and general management.

 

·     Council considers the employment of trades people with traditional trade skills to in-house heritage building maintenance, with the aim of placing Liverpool City Council as a leader in heritage asset management.

 

Officer Comment:

 

This matter will be considered as part of the Facilities Management review underway.

 

The recommendation to acknowledge the work of staff will not have a financial impact. The other committee recommendations, which are operational matters, will be investigated.

 

         

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Minutes of the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held on 24 May 2021.  


1

CTTE 01

Minutes of the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held on 24 May 2021

Attachment 1

Minutes of the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held on 24 May 2021.

 

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1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Committee Reports

 

CTTE 02

Minutes of the Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee meeting held on 21 July 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Advocate for, and develop, transport networks to create an accessible city

File Ref

250523.2021

Report By

Charles Wiafe - Service Manager Transport Management

Approved By

David Smith - Acting Director Planning & Compliance

 

Executive Summary

 

This report presents the recommendations of the Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee meeting held on 21 July 2021. At the meeting, the Committee considered fifteen (15) agenda items, three (3) technical discussion items and fifteen (15) general business items.

 

A copy of the meeting minutes, incorporating the Committee’s recommendations on the agenda items is included in Attachment 1.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts the following recommendations of the Committee:

 

Item 1         Campbell Street, Liverpool – Proposed Raised Threshold.

 

·        Approves the raised threshold as shown in the Attachment booklet.

 

Item 2         88 Kurrajong Road, Prestons - Proposed Traffic Facilities and Signs and Linemarking Scheme.

 

·        Approves the proposed median islands and associated signs and linemarking scheme in Kurrajong Road, west of Kookaburra Road (North) as shown in the Attachment booklet.

 

Item 3         Fourteenth Avenue, Austral - Proposed Traffic Facilities and Signs and Linemarking Scheme.

 

·        Approves the signs and linemarking scheme as shown in the Attachment booklet.

 

Item 4        Moorebank East, Moorebank – Proposed Traffic Facilities and Signs and Linemarking Scheme.

 

·        Approves the signs and linemarking scheme as presented.

 

Item 5         Flynn Avenue, Middleton Grange – Speed Concerns and Proposed Raised Threshold in front of Thomas Hassell College.

 

·        Approves the proposed traffic facilities as shown in the Attachment booklet.

 

Item 6         Flynn Avenue, Middleton Grange - Proposed Traffic Restrictions through the Western Sydney Parklands.

 

·        Approves the proposed road closures.

·        All stakeholders to be advised of the road closures.

 

Item 7         Talana Hill Drive, Edmondson Park - Request for Raised Thresholds.

 

·        Approves Installation of two raised thresholds across Talana Hill Drive Section. Community consultation is to be carried out with residents close to the proposed raised threshold location to confirm the locations. 

·        Detailed design of the raised thresholds be submitted to the TfNSW and Police for review prior to installation.

 

Item 8         Stanton Street, Liverpool - Request for AM and PM peak ‘No Left Turn’ and ‘No Right Turn’ restrictions at its intersection with Memorial Avenue and Flowerdale Road.

 

·        The ‘No Left Turn’ and ‘No Right Turn’ access restrictions through Stanton Street be deferred.

·        Community consultation be carried out with local residents to consider treatment options including ‘No Left Turn’ at the Stanton Street and Flowerdale Road intersection, installation of traffic calming devices including rumble bars in the curved road section.

·        The outcome of the community consultation be presented to the September traffic committee meeting.

 

Item 9         Manning Street, Warwick Farm – Proposed Traffic Calming Scheme.

 

·        Approves the interim treatments along Manning Street involving improved signage, pavement marking, and street lighting as shown in the Attachment booklet.

 

Item 10       Barry Road, Chipping Norton – Proposed Pedestrian Refuge.

 

·        Approves installation of pedestrian refuge in Barry Road at Ernest Avenue intersection, Chipping Norton, as shown in the Attachment booklet.

·        Detailed design of the pedestrian refuge to include design of a crossing facility across Ernest Street, to be presented at a future meeting.

 

Item 11       Fifteenth Avenue, Austral – Proposed ‘No Right Turn’ restrictions at Craik Avenue intersection.

 

·        Approves installation of the proposed No Right Turn into Craik Avenue subject to TfNSW approval.

·        A traffic management plan (on the proposed right turn movements) be prepared and submitted to TfNSW endorsement prior to implementation.

 

Item 12       Transport for NSW Digital Smart Kerb Pilot Scheme – Update and Second Street.

 

·        Approves installation of parking sensors in the parking spaces along sections of Elizabeth Street, College Street, Bigge Street, and Moore Street as part of the Smart Kerb Pilot.

 

Item 13       Badgerys Creek Road, Badgerys Creek – Access to the metro station proposed roundabout.

 

·        Approves the submitted detailed design and signage and linemarking plans of the proposed roundabout.

·        Council to enter an agreement with Sydney Metro for removal of this temporary roundabout once the construction work is complete. Alternative access is to be identified and established to access the Metro station and future Bradfield City Centre.

 

Item 14       Ardennes Avenue, Edmondson Park - Request for Traffic Calming Devices.

 

·        Approves installation of asphalt concrete speed humps in front of House No’s 113-115 and between Darwin Road/Normandy Road.

 

Item 15       Items Approved Under Delegated Authority.

 

·        Approves the works approved under the delegated approval process.

 

REPORT

 

This report presents the recommendations of the Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee meeting held on 21 July 2021. At the meeting, the Committee considered fifteen (15) agenda items, three (3) technical discussion items and fifteen (15) general business items.

 

A copy of the meeting minutes, incorporating the Committee’s recommendations on the agenda items is included in Attachment 1. It is recommended that Council adopts the Committee’s recommendations on the agenda items as outlined above.

 

Three (3) technical discussion items and fifteen (15) general business items were considered, and the recommended actions are as follows:

 

Technical Discussion Items

 

TD1 - Kurrajong Road – Noise Impact of the Raided Threshold

 

The resident has been informed that due to COVID lockdown, noise assessments cannot be carried out at this stage. This item is deferred and to be discussed at the September 2021 or at a future meeting after completion of the requested noise assessment.

 

TD2 - Kingsford Smith Avenue - School Bus Route

 

Council will write to the two local bus companies that services the local area that the revised bus route is now via Kingsford Smith Avenue and Southern Cross Avenue. In addition, Thomas Hassall College is to be advised not to use the side streets off Kingsford Smith Avenue as a bus route.

 

TD3 - Lord Howe Drive – Request for Relocation of a Bus Stop

 

No representative of the local bus company was present at the meeting. A previous email from the local bus company representative indicated that if a shelter were to be installed, it would be non-compliant with the TfNSW bus stop layout requirements.

 

A design was sent through as guidance for when installing new stops and undertaking auditing. There is a requirement of 1.5m clear space around the bus stop. The bus stops in the area are already less than 400m apart. Locations can be assessed to move the bus stops.

 

The local resident has expressed concern about the proposed bus shelter and Council has received a petition objection to the installation. The Committee discussed and endorsed a position that, investigation be carried out to identify an alternate suitable location for the bus shelter to be installed.

 

General Business Items

 

GB1 - Second Avenue, West Hoxton – Proposed Road Extension.

 

Clr Hagarty reported that he has received objections for the proposed extension. Hence, the Committee endorsed that the proposed extension is not to proceed.

 

GB2 - 5 McGirr Parade, Warwick Farm – Request for parking restriction signs.

 

This will be submitted under delegated authority.

 

GB3 - Graham Avenue, Casula - Request for traffic calming devices.

 

The Police reported that enforcement is regularly undertaken at this location, but an engineering solution would not be objected to. Council will investigate to determine whether an engineering solution is needed along the road. This will be reported to the November 2021 meeting.

 

GB4 - Wilson Road/Hinchinbrook Drive/Partridge Avenue, Hinchinbrook – Request for additional speed hump.

 

Investigations will be carried out and if additional speed humps are required, design layouts will be prepared and presented to the November 2021 meeting.

 

 

GB5 - Cressbrook Drive, Wattle Grove - Request for installation of a “No Stopping” zone.

 

Approval for the parking restriction will be sought under delegated authority.

 

GB6 - Fifteenth Avenue, Austral – Traffic movements.

 

Design investigation will be carried out and if required, presented to the Committee at the November 2021 meeting for further discussion.

 

GB7 - Dalmatia Avenue/Vinny Road, Edmondson Park - Request for traffic calming devices.

 

Design investigation will be carried out and if required, presented to the Committee at the November 2021 meeting for further discussion.

 

GB8 - Keato Avenue, Hammondville – Speeding.

 

The Committee endorsed a position that Police continue speed enforcement.

 

GB9 - Orange Grove, Warwick Farm – Speeding.

 

The Committee endorsed a position that the Police continue speed enforcement.

 

GB10 - Harraden Drive, West Hoxton - Request for traffic calming devices.

 

The Committee endorsed a position that the Police continue speed enforcement.

 

GB11 - Lethbridge Road, Austral – Request for installation of a speed hump.

 

The Committee endorsed a position that the Police continue speed enforcement.

 

GB12 - Ashcroft Avenue, Casula – Speeding.

 

The Committee endorsed a position that the Police continue speed enforcement.

 

 

 

GB13 - 238 and 240 Epsom Road, Chipping Norton - Request for Parking Restrictions.

 

The Committee endorsed a position that parking restrictions are not supported but Community Standards team should continue to enforce any illegal parking across the driveways and the driveways can be highlighted with transvers lines.

 

 

 

GB14 - Tulloch Close, Casula – 2P parking restriction.

 

Staff advised that since 4P was introduced at the nearby shopping centre, the medical centre at the corner approached Council and complained of increased parking in front of property and asked for parking restrictions in the street. It was found many residents do not support it.

 

Parking restrictions can be considered in front of house numbers 2 and 4 but not the entire street. The affected residents will be consulted for their feedback before any implementation.

 

 

GB15 – Cartwright Avenue and Willian Drive, Cartwright – Line marking roundabout

 

There are issues with the operation of the roundabout, with some motorists thinking there are two lanes.

 

The Police requested investigation to identify whether the linemarking needs to be changed to improve lane discipline at the roundabout.

 

Budget impact of matters arising from the minutes

 

Item

Description

Funding, Indicative Cost and Timing

1

Campbell Street, Liverpool – Proposed Raised Threshold

TfNSW Safer Roads Grant Funding

Indicative Cost - $160,000. 

Timing – May 2022.

2

88 Kurrajong Road, Prestons- Proposed Traffic Facilities and Signs and Line marking Scheme

Developer

Indicative Cost – No cost to Council 

Timing – Dependent on the Developer construction timeline.   

3

Fourteenth Avenue, Austral - Proposed Traffic Facilities and Signs and Line marking Scheme

Developer

Indicative Cost – No cost to Council 

 Timing – Dependent on the Developer construction timeline.   

4

Moorebank East, Moorebank – Proposed Traffic Facilities and Signs and Line marking Scheme

Developer

Indicative Cost – No cost to Council 

Timing – Dependent on the Developer construction timeline.       

5

Flynn Avenue, Middleton Grange – Speed Concerns and Proposed Raised Threshold in front of Thomas Hassell College

Developer

Indicative Cost – No cost to Council 

 Timing – Dependent on the Developer construction timeline.       

6

Flynn Avenue, Middleton Grange - Proposed Traffic Restrictions through the Western Sydney Parklands

Council’s minor traffic facilities project

Indicative Cost - $10,000.  Western Sydney Parklands to be requested to be contribute.

Timing – December 2021.  

7

Talana Hill Drive, Edmondson Park - Request for Raised Thresholds

 

Council’s minor traffic facilities project

Indicative Cost - $30,000. 

Timing – March 2022. 

8

Stanton Street, Liverpool - Request for AM and PM peak ‘No Left Turn’ and ‘No Right Turn’ restrictions at its intersection with Memorial Avenue and Flowerdale Road

Item deferred - No cost implication.

 

9

Manning Street, Warwick Farm – Proposed Traffic Calming Scheme

Council’s minor traffic facilities project

Indicative Cost - $30,000. 

Timing – March 2022. 

10

Barry Road, Chipping Norton – Proposed Pedestrian Refuge

Council’s minor traffic facilities project

Indicative Cost - $30,000. 

Timing – June 2022. 

11

Fifteenth Avenue, Austral – Proposed ‘No Right Turn’ restrictions at Craik Avenue intersection

TfNSW block grant funding

Indicative Cost - $3,000.

Timing – October 2021.

12

Transport for NSW Digital Smart Kerb Pilot Scheme – Update and Second Street

Developer (TfNSW)

Indicative Cost – No cost to Council 

Timing – Dependent on TfNSW implementation timeline.       

13

Badgerys Creek Road, Badgerys Creek – Access to the metro station proposed roundabout

Developer (Sydney Metro)

Indicative Cost – No cost to Council 

Timing – Dependent on the Sydney Metro construction timeline.   

14

Ardennes Avenue, Edmondson Park - Request for Traffic Calming Devices

Council’s minor traffic facilities project

Indicative Cost - $30,000. 

Timing – June 2022. 

15

Items Approved Under Delegated Authority

TfNSW block grant funding

Indicative Cost - $10,000.

Timing – August 2021.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Provide efficient parking for the City Centre.

Deliver a high-quality local road system including provision and maintenance of infrastructure and management of traffic issues.

Environment

Promote an integrated and user-friendly public transport service.

Support the delivery of a range of transport options.


Social

Support access and services for people with a disability.

Improve road and pedestrian safety.


Civic Leadership

Actively advocate for federal and state government support, funding and services.

Legislative

Roads Act.

Risk

The risk is considered Low.

The risk is considered within Council’s risk appetite.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Liverpool Pedestrian Active Transport and Traffic Committee Meeting Minutes - 21 July 2021 (Under Separate Cover)   


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Committee Reports

 

CTTE 03

Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee meeting held on 3 August 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

253720.2021

Report By

George Georgakis - Manager Council and Executive Services

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director Corporate Services

 

Executive Summary

 

This report is tabled in order to present the Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee Meeting held on 3 August 2021.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee meeting held on 3 August 2021.

 

REPORT

 

The Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee meeting held on 3 August 2021 are attached for the information of Council.

 

The minutes contain the following Committee recommendation:

 

·           That Council investigate potential heritage buildings of significance due to new developments occurring in the Austral area.

 

The meeting also considered the nominations and made recommendations for people to receive the Order of Liverpool Awards for 2021. As this information contains personal information, that part of the minutes has been included in a separate report in the Confidential Section of the meeting agenda.

 


 

    

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

Risk

The risk is deemed to be low and is considered to be within Council’s risk appetite.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Civic Advisory Committee Minutes from 3 August 2021 - Excluding Item 4  


1

CTTE 03

Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee meeting held on 3 August 2021

Attachment 1

Civic Advisory Committee Minutes from 3 August 2021 - Excluding Item 4

 

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1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Questions with Notice

 

QWN 01

Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Provision of “Off the Leash Dog Parks” throughout the Liverpool LGA

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Develop, and advocate for, plans that support safe and friendly communities

File Ref

241481.2021

 

QUESTION WITH NOTICE

 

Can Council explain what process does Liverpool Council use when determining:

 

a)    Where “off the leash dog parks” are situated throughout the Liverpool LGA?

 

b)    How many “off the leash Dog Parks” should be provided in Liverpool LGA?

 

Response

 

Provision of off-leash dog parks are a legislative requirement. The Local Government Act 1993 requires all local councils to provide at least one off-leash dog area and promote such facilities to the owners of companion animals.

 

In meeting this requirement of the Act, Council’s Recreation, Open Space and Sports Strategy (ROSS Strategy) includes a section regarding off-leash dog areas which guides the planning and provision of off-leash dog parks.

 

Off-leash areas bring many benefits to dogs and owners including:

·     Reduced nuisance dog behaviour;

·     Socialisation of dogs;

·     Healthier and friendlier dogs;

·     Increased chance of owner exercise and social connection, both spontaneous and planned; and

·     Connection with nature for both dogs and owners.

 

The ROSS Strategy outlines the equitable provision of dog-friendly areas throughout the LGA and that they should be located in areas with easy access, including areas of high need, including Liverpool CBD where there is a rise in high density and apartment living. Therefore, designated spaces for companion animals to exercise and socialise have become increasingly important.

 

The planning, design and delivery of off-leash dog parks is identified as key action of the ROSS Strategy Action Plan. The strategy recommends planning and provision of:

·     One large fenced off-leash area in each of Liverpool District areas; and

·     At least one off-leash area in every suburb (subject to site availability).

 

Council’s current off-leash dog parks are fenced. In areas such as reserves and parklands with low vehicle and pedestrian access, unfenced off-leash areas can be designed. All dog parks are designed to include and make available supporting facilities like dog bowls, water refill stations, disposal bags and bins, and signage outlining owners’ responsibilities. These supporting facilities will be necessary in both fenced and unfenced designated off-leash areas.

 

Council currently provides off-leash dog areas at the following locations:

1.    Lieutenant Cantello Reserve, Hammondville

2.    Casula Parklands, Casula

3.    Macleod Park, Prestons

4.    Miller Park, Miller

5.    Hoxton Park Reserve, Hoxton Park

6.    Cirillo Reserve, Middleton Grange

7.    Shale Hills Dog park, West Hoxton (within Western Sydney Parklands)

 

In addition, the provision of off-leash dog areas is being considered as part of the planning and design of the following parks:

1.    Basin 14-open space, Edmondson Park - Off leash dog park included within the basin design and will be delivered as part of the project.

2.    The Homestead Park, Chipping Norton - Future off-leash area is being investigated through Georges River Parklands and Chipping Norton Lakes Spatial Framework.

 

Council will continue to assess the demand for provision of off-leash dog parks across the Liverpool LGA.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Questions with Notice

 

QWN 02

Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Council submission on Moorebank Intermodal State Significant Development

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

241484.2021

 

QUESTION WITH NOTICE

 

Can Council answer the following:

 

1.    Did Liverpool Council submit an objection to NSW Government Planning – Major Projects – Project SSD-10431.

 

2.    Can Council confirm if they received a Notice of Determination of Application Moorebank Intermodal Precinct West - Stage 3 (SSD-10431), from the Department of Planning Industry and Environment that they would have received on or around 18 June 2021, like the other Objectors within our community?

 

3.    Can Council provide a copy of the letter if received, to all Councillors?

 

4.    Can Council confirm that as an Objector; as is listed on the DPIE major projects portal; that Liverpool City Council has until August 13th [56 days from June 18th] to exercise its right as an Objector as per s8.8 and s8.10 of the Act (Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 No 203)?

 

Response

1.    Did Liverpool Council submit an objection to NSW Government Planning – Major Projects – Project SSD-10431

 

Yes. Please refer to Attachment 1 for a copy of Council’s submission.

 

2.    Can Council confirm if they received a Notice of Determination of Application Moorebank Intermodal Precinct West - Stage 3 (SSD-10431), from the Department of Planning Industry and Environment that they would have received on or around 18 June 2021, like the other Objectors within our community?

 

Yes. Please refer to Attachment 2 for a copy of the Notice of Determination.

 

 

3.    Can Council provide a copy of the letter if received, to all Councillors?

 

Please refer to Attachment 2 for a copy of the Notice of Determination.

 

4.    Can Council confirm that as an Objector; as is listed on the DPIE major projects portal; that Liverpool City Council has until August 13th [56 days from June 18th] to exercise its right as an Objector as per s8.8 and s8.10 of the Act (Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 No 203)?

 

Yes, Council had until 13 August 2021 to exercise its rights as an objector. Council had not resolved to appeal the decision before that date.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Council submission

2.         Notice of Determination


1

QWN 02

Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Council submission on Moorebank Intermodal State Significant Development

Attachment 1

Council submission

 

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1

QWN 02

Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Council submission on Moorebank Intermodal State Significant Development

Attachment 2

Notice of Determination

 

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1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Questions with Notice

 

QWN 03

Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Legal Reports and Records

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

241489.2021

 

QUESTION WITH NOTICE

 

Does Council:

 

1.    Make available on the Councillor intranet, Liverpool Council’s legal reports of all legal engagements on an Annual Basis listed first under:

a)    The years of a Council elected term, and also;

b)    Year that the Council engagement was first initiated, e.g.: 2016 – 2021/ 2016 – 2017 etc

 

That can be accessed by Councillors at any time, and also provide the use of a historic record for the transition of different elected members onto Council per term?

 

2.    Would it be possible for all past legal report records to be filed and made available in a similar fashion on the Councillor intranet for Councillors referral?

 

Response

 

1.    Make available on the Councillor intranet, Liverpool Council’s Legal reports of all legal engagements on an Annual Basis listed first under:

a)    The years of a Council elected term, and also

b)    Year that the Council engagement was first initiated, e.g.: 2016 – 2021/ 2016 – 2017 etc

 

Past Legal Affairs Reports are already available on the Councillor Intranet page, under the archive tab. Further to this, legal proceedings are also reported in Councils Annual Report.

 

If a separate tab is being sought for the reports to be held under, this may be able to be arranged, to allow for easier access.

 

If the request is for the reports to be re-formatted as above, such as in year of commencement, this is not possible, not only due to the intensive resources that would be required, but matters also commence and cease and commence again throughout the years.  

 

 

2.    Would it be possible for all past legal report records to be filed and made available in a similar fashion on the Councillor intranet for Councillor’s referral?

 

As previously stated in the answer above to question 1, Legal Affairs Reports can already be accessed through the archive tab on the Councillor Intranet page. It may be possible for a separate tab to be placed on the intranet page for these reports, to allow for ease of access.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Questions with Notice

 

QWN 04

Question with Notice - Clr Harle - Shopping Trolleys, Parkbridge Estate Road Extension, Solar Energy, and Staff Changes

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

263293.2021

 

QUESTION WITH NOTICE

 

Please address the following:

 

1.    In relation to shopping trolleys,

a)    What progress, if any, has been made on the issue of abandoned shopping trolleys with the State Government?

b)    How is Council policing shopping trolley owners to take all necessary steps to ensure their shopping trolleys remain within their designated areas?

c)    What action is Council taking if the owners are not complying?

d)    With the new shopping centres such as Edmondson Park, has there been any significant change in the number of abandoned shopping trolleys compared to older areas?

 

2.   With reference to the Parkbridge Estate road extension under the M7, when is it likely that this connection will be undertaken and a possible completion date?

 

3.   Does Council have a policy encouraging solar energy is retrofitted to Community buildings as part of their refurbishment when and if it falls due?

a)    Examples?

 

4.    Can Council provide a regular update of relevant staff changes that Councillors may have access to?

 

A response to these questions will be provided in the business papers for the September 2021 Council meeting.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Questions with Notice

 

QWN 05

Question with Notice - Clr Harle - Covid and English Language Courses

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Increase community engagement

File Ref

263325.2021

 

QUESTION WITH NOTICE

 

Please address the following:

 

Considering the current Covid pandemic and communications problems caused by language difficulties within our community, what is Council offering in English language Courses to the community?

 

A response to these questions will be provided in the business papers of the September 2021 Council meeting.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Questions with Notice

 

QWN 06

Question with Notice - Clr Hadchiti - Retail Hierarchy

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Attract businesses for economic growth and employment opportunities

File Ref

264008.2021

 

QUESTION WITH NOTICE

 

Given that retail outlets can shut their doors down at will to walk in customers, what’s the point of investing in and implementing a Retail Hierarchy?

 

 

A response to this question with notice will be provided in the business papers for the September 2021 Council meeting.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Notices of Motion

 

NOM 01

Liverpool Animal Shelter - Animal Return Policy for previously rehomed animals

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Develop, and advocate for, plans that support safe and friendly communities

File Ref

262566.2021

Author

Karress Rhodes - Councillor

 

Background

 

I am aware of a recent incident where a dog recently rehomed from the Liverpool Animal shelter was no longer able to be kept at the home of the person who had adopted the animal.

 

I was also informed that the person could not return the animal to the Liverpool Animal Shelter as the contract of sale does not allow an animal to be returned to the animal shelter once adopted.

 

I also confirmed that Council has a clause written into the contract of sale that doesn’t allow adopted animals to be returned to the shelter.

 

Council advice also confirms that there is a rigorous rehoming process that Council believes has resulted in only three people having contacted the shelter to discuss returning their animal after recent adoption.

 

I note in the most recent case that I am aware of, involving an animal having to be rehomed after recently being adopted from the Liverpool Animal Shelter, the owner made no attempt to contact Council because of the no return clause in the contract of sale.

 

The question is, is the reported low rate of people contacting the shelter about return issues a result of rigorous rehoming procedures at the shelter or is it because of the no return clause in the contract of sale agreement and that perhaps there is a higher number?

 

The current contract of sale that people sign states that the shelter will not accept the return of any animals adopted from the shelter.

 

I am concerned about the consequences for animals caught in such circumstances if not rehomed or being able to be returned to the shelter.

 

It is not a good outcome for the animal nor for Liverpool as such animals may find themselves back on the streets as strays and only after much suffering, again end up being the responsibility of Liverpool Council and possibly with health issues as a result of neglect.

 

It may be in the best interest of the welfare of any such animal adopted from the Liverpool Animal Shelter, but who for certain prescribed exceptional circumstances within a qualified period of time from being first adopted, are accepted by the Liverpool Animal Shelter to be returned by the original adoptee of the animal, all of which would be prescribed in the report back to Council that addresses the merits or otherwise of a  possible return policy to address the situation and questions raised in this motion for further discussion and consideration.

 

The following is a question I asked at the last Council meeting, and which was taken on notice:

 

“Is there a return policy whereby an animal can be returned to the pound, within a particular timeframe if it hasn’t worked out”?

 

The response to the question to council taken on notice from the July 2021 Council meeting was:

 

“Council does not accept returns of animals adopted from the shelter. Statistically, Council has rehomed 294 dogs between June 2019 - June 2021. Out of these, only 3 owners have contacted the shelter to discuss returns. One was after having the dog for six months. Council’s Sale Agreement is attached.

 

Prior to the adoptee signing this form, adoptees go through a rigorous process to be matched up with the right pet. Council’s Rehoming Officer first conducts a phone interview to determine whether the person’s home and lifestyle is suitable for the dog and discusses the dog’s behaviours and characteristics. If it is a good match, the officer books a meet and greet with the family at the shelter.

 

These often take more than an hour, and in some cases the family is encouraged to come back on a second occasion (if the dog is shy and needs time to warm up). At the end of each meet and greet the officer has an open clear discussion with the family to ensure they are ready to meet the needs of the dog and discusses Council’s no returns policy, so it is clear to them prior to finalising their adoption paperwork.

 

Due to rigorous rehoming processes, Council does not have any issues with people seeking to return animals”.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION

 

That Council receive a report at the September 2021 Council meeting on the merits or otherwise, including any reasonable conditions, of allowing the return of animals previously rehomed from the Liverpool Animal Shelter, that would need to be considered in a possible Return Policy for previously rehomed animals.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S COMMENT

 

The day-to-day management of the Liverpool Animal Shelter is an “operational matter” that the General Manager is responsible for under Section 335 of the Local Government Act. The adoption process (including the Sale of Animal Agreement) has operated successfully for nearly 5 years without complaint. As an operational matter, changing the current adoption process is not supported, based on the one example provided in this NOM. Permitting returns and changing the current rehoming process may have financial implications for Council and potential adverse impacts on the welfare of the animals.

 

Background

 

When Council commenced the operation of the Liverpool Animal Shelter in 2016, a sale of animal agreement was implemented, based on legal advice at the time. The purpose of the agreement was to ensure Council was not liable for any animal related costs once an animal is rehomed and to ensure the welfare of adopted animals.

 

Adopted animals take approximately three months to settle with a new family in a new home.  It can be challenging for both a new family and their new pet and so it is important to ensure future owners of pets are committed to adopting an animal. Returning an animal to the shelter once adopted can make the animal anxious and stressed, making it difficult for the animal to settle and be rehomed again.

 

A new owner may return the animal because it has been injured, ill or involved in an attack to avoid outlaying expenses on vet treatments, without revealing these issues to Council.

 

Council’s previous advice provided to Councillors following a question taken on notice at last month’s Council meeting indicates the Sale of Animal Agreement is effective, and statistically, there is not a wider issue with people seeking to return animals due to Councils rigorous rehoming processes.

 

Between July 2019 and July 2021, 286 dogs were rehomed.  50 of these dogs were adopted by homes in the Liverpool LGA (17.5%) and 82.5% of dogs were rehomed to homes outside the Liverpool LGA. In addition, for the same period, 908 dogs were impounded and only 1 dog that was previously adopted from Liverpool Animal Shelter was among the dogs impounded. 

 

The statement that these animals, if not being able to be returned, will find themselves as strays and become the responsibility of Liverpool Council is not supported by the statistics above. In fact, it indicates that Council’s adoption processes are very successful.

 

As no details have been provided to Council regarding the alleged incident referred to in this NOM, Council is unable to comment further.

.

 

 

Council officers are available to assist people with any issues they have with their new pet, offering advice on enrichment and training. Council has also put together an Adoption Guide which is given to adoptees to provide support to owners and animals during the transition period.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Sale of Animal Agreement Contract


1

NOM 01

Liverpool Animal Shelter - Animal Return Policy for previously rehomed animals

Attachment 1

Sale of Animal Agreement Contract

 

PDF Creator


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Notices of Motion

 

NOM 02

Liverpool Animal Shelter Social Media Animal Rehoming Service

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Seek efficient and innovative methods to manage our resources

File Ref

263983.2021

Author

Karress Rhodes - Councillor

 

Background

 

Liverpool has once again been severely impacted by shutdowns as a result of COVID 19 that has closed our rehoming services through the Animal Welfare Shelter.

 

Professional advice indicates that there will be continued lock downs when necessary for the foreseeable future even if 80% vaccination is achieved. This questions the need for Council to look at alternate ways of delivering the rehoming service that can continue during lockdowns and also work as a valuable tool even if and when the lock down restrictions do not apply.

 

Council is currently accustomed to placing photographs on Social media of animals in the Liverpool Animal Welfare Shelter, but in the wake of COVID and in view of what other LGA’s are doing in the space of Social Media in order to keep rehoming services available to constituents, it needs to be addressed on what Liverpool could or should provide for our Constituents in a similar way.

 

Care needs to be taken on Council being able to assess the appropriateness of constituents’ place of residence for the adopted animals, as well as animals being adopted on a whim by people bored whilst in lockdown and on possible ways Council could address these issues through a social media led adoption service.

 

Both Campbelltown and Blacktown are providing a rehoming service through this method and perhaps it is time for Liverpool to do the same.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION

 

That Council consider and report to September Council Meeting 2021 on the merits or otherwise of the provision of Social Media animal rehoming services that includes photo and video of animals up for adoption.

 

 

 

 

Chief executive officer’s COmment

 

As an operational matter, animal rehoming has been temporarily suspended at the Liverpool Animal Shelter due to Public Health Orders. Council staff are continuing to care for animals housed at the shelter and lost pets can still be dropped off at the shelter and pet owners are able to collect their pet by phoning the animal shelter.

 

Staff attending to animal welfare at the animal shelter are considered “authorised workers” under the Public Health Order. All residents of Greater Sydney are under stay-at-home orders, with new and significant penalties for breaches of the Public Health Orders. It is not a reasonable excuse for residents to leave their home to purchase a pet.

 

Council already uses social media and the animal shelter website to advertise animals that are available for adoption. Once COVID restrictions are relaxed, Council will recommence animal rehoming.  

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021

Notices of Motion

 

NOM 03

Pedestrian Bridge from Casula Railway Station to Moorebank Intermodal

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Develop, and advocate for, plans that support safe and friendly communities

File Ref

264095.2021

Author

Karress Rhodes - Councillor

 

Background

 

The anticipated employment opportunities that the Moorebank Intermodal site has been reported to be the most significant employment opportunity in the Liverpool LGA to date. Liverpool’s congested traffic makes the Intermodal site difficult to access by roads particularly when you consider the impact of delivery truck movements transferred from Port Botany to this site. The truck movements of goods competing with the sites employee access could be better addressed by utilising the Casula Railway Station, encouraging and promoting rail rather than vehicle access, through the delivery of a pedestrian bridge directly to the Moorebank Intermodal place of employment, taking traffic off Liverpool roads, reducing air pollution and supporting local jobs.

 

The plans to build a substantial parking station at the Casula Railway Station also supports the positive benefit that such a pedestrian bridge would provide in servicing Liverpool’s reported most significant employment opportunity.

 

The Casula Parkland has been the focus of Liverpool Council’s delivery of social amenity infrastructure such as the Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre and restaurant, sculpture walk, dog park, soon to be delivered Environment Centre and river access that is a major visitation precinct unequalled in the Liverpool LGA thus far.

 

A pedestrian bridge would provide residents east of the Georges River the opportunity to enjoy the social benefits of Council investment into social infrastructure into the Casula Parklands that residents west of the Georges River currently enjoy. A bridge would encourage physical activity and improve health outcomes for Liverpool citizens.

 

The pedestrian bridge would further contribute to the visitation economy and enhance the activation of the Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre, restaurant, and parklands by making access more available to all residents in the Liverpool LGA.

 

 

 

NOTICE OF MOTION

 

That Council consider and report to the October 2021 Council meeting on the merits or otherwise of the provision of a pedestrian crossing over the Georges River from the Casula Railway Station to the Moorebank Intermodal site, that includes:

 

1.    Cost of bridge and possible Moorebank Intermodal contribution to the cost;

 

2.    Possible State and Federal grants;

 

3.    Analysis of anticipated Moorebank Intermodal job opportunities that would benefit through the train, pedestrian access;

 

4.    Estimated number of vehicles that could be taken off our roads by employees using trains and or pedestrian access to the Moorebank Intermodal job opportunities; and

 

5.    Benefit of pedestrian bridge to CPAC, dog park, Environment Centre linking east of the Georges River residents to driverless access to the Liverpool Council facilities.

 

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S COMMENT

 

A Traffic, Transport and Accessibility Impact Assessment Report prepared for the Moorebank Intermodal Precinct West (MPW) and Moorebank Intermodal Precinct East (MPE) developments discussed the potential for a pedestrian/cyclist link from Casula station to the Moorebank Intermodal development site.  However, the development consents for MPE and MPW Stages 1 and 2 do not include a requirement for the Intermodal company to construct such a link and associated pedestrian bridge.

 

The traffic and transport improvements approved as part of the MPW and MPE developments include:

·     road improvement works at the M5 Motorway and Moorebank Avenue intersection;

·     the upgrade of Moorebank Avenue; and

·     bus service to connect to train stations.

 

Council’s submission on the Moorebank Intermodal developments outlined a need for a potential future bridge between Casula station and the Intermodal site.

 

Condition 18 of SSD 5066 MPW West Concept and Stage 1 and Condition B2(j) of MPW Stage 2 requires “the layout of the site shall not prevent a possible future pedestrian connection to Casula Railway Station” and “provision of a corridor between Moorebank Avenue and the Georges River for a possible future pedestrian connection across the Georges River to Casula Railway Station, of a width that would allow the future construction of a shared path that complies with the relevant suggested width set out in the Guide to Road Design Part 6A: Paths for Walking and Cycling (Austroads, 2017)”

 

The Urban Development Design Report, which provides a consolidated landscape plan for the MPW site has been approved by DPIE in consultation with Government Architect NSW, which includes provision for pedestrian and/or cycling access from Casula station in the future.

 

A bridge would be approximately 500m long, with associated abutments, and require paved footpaths links. It would increase public transport access to MPW and MPE sites and would reduce travel time and annual operational costs of local bus services to the MIT sites. 

 

A report by the October 2021 Council meeting as requested in this Notice of Motion is unable to be achieved.

 

Whilst Council is pleased that provision has been made in the planning approvals for a potential future bridge connection, a pedestrian bridge in this location is not required to be delivered by the Intermodal company and is not identified in Council’s future infrastructure projects or in the 10-year capital works program. No design or other investigations have been carried out to understand the likely costs of the project. There is no budget included in the 2021/22 Operational Plan to undertake the necessary studies to provide meaningful information to Council on costings, grant opportunities, analysis of anticipated job opportunities, potential reduced vehicle trips and other potential benefits outlined in the Notice of Motion. 

 

If Council wishes such a project to be considered as a future infrastructure project, this will need to be considered during the normal budget planning process.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


1

Ordinary Meeting

25 August 2021