COUNCIL AGENDA

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

24 November 2021

 

 

online


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You are hereby notified that an Ordinary Council Meeting of Liverpool City Council will be held ONLINE on Wednesday, 24 November 2021 commencing at 6.00pm.

 

Liverpool City Council Meetings are livestreamed onto Council’s website and remain on Council’s website for a period of 12 months.  If you have any enquiries, please contact Council and Executive Services on 8711 7584.

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Dr Eddie Jackson

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

 

 


 

 

 


Order of Business

 

                                                                                                              PAGE     TAB

Opening

Acknowledgment of Country and Prayer

Apologies

Condolences

Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council Meeting held on 27 October 2021............................................................... 6

Declarations of Interest

Public Forum

Mayoral Report

NIL

Notices of Motion Of Rescission

NIL

Chief Executive Officer Report

NIL

Planning & Compliance Report

PLAN 01         Place Naming Requests: Car Parks in Liverpool and Stairway in Casula..... 63......... 1

PLAN 02         Submission on Explanation of Intended Effect - Large Scale Cemeteries as State Significant Development................................................................................. 74......... 2

PLAN 03         Submission on Aerotropolis Planning Package............................................. 79......... 3

PLAN 04         Report back - QWN 03 from 27 October 2021 Council meeting COVID-19 and Council Orders................................................................................................ 94......... 4

PLAN 05         Update on the revised draft Warwick Farm Racing Precinct structure plan, draft planning proposal and draft contributions plan to be provided in the Addendum Booklet

Community & Culture Report

COM 01          Grants, Donations & Community Sponsorship Report................................. 112......... 5

COM 02          Report back to Council: Harris Creek Reserve Fairy Glen.......................... 116......... 6

Corporate Services Report

CORP 01        Investment Report October 2021................................................................. 123......... 7

CORP 02        Annual Financial Reports 2020-21............................................................... 132......... 8

CORP 03        2017-2022 Community Strategic Plan End of Term Report........................ 135......... 9

CORP 04        Budget Review - September 2021............................................................... 138....... 10

City Presentation Report

PRES 01         Review of Waste Technologies.................................................................... 167....... 11

Infrastructure & Environment Report

NIL

Economy & Commercial Development Report

ECD 01           Dedication of Lot 613 in DP1268345 First Avenue, Hoxton Park as Public Road   187 12

ECD 02           TfNSW proposed Construction Lease over Council land being part Lot 5000 DP 855173 off Albemarle Place, Cecil Hills....................................................... 190....... 13

Committee Reports

CTTE 01         Minutes of Liverpool Access Committee meeting held on 7 October 2021. 206....... 14

CTTE 02         Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee held on 11 October 2021 213        15

CTTE 03         Minutes of Strategic Panel meeting held on 11 October 2021.................... 223....... 16

CTTE 04         Minutes of the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee Meeting held on 15 October 2021................................................................................................ 231....... 17

CTTE 05         Minutes of the Tourism and CBD Committee Meeting held 26 October 2021 245     18

CTTE 06         Minutes of the Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee meeting held on 1 November 2021.............................................................. 252....... 19

CTTE 07         Minutes of the Civic Advisory Committee meeting held on 2 November 2021 258    20

Questions with Notice

QWN 01          Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Private Investigators........................... 264....... 21

QWN 02          Question with Notice - Clr Kaliyanda - Staff Picnic Day............................... 265....... 22

Presentations by Councillors

Notices of Motion

NOM 01          No Concrete Crushing Facility...................................................................... 266....... 23

NOM 02          Montella Place Prestons............................................................................... 269....... 24

NOM 03          Road Reclassification in Liverpool............................................................... 270....... 25

NOM 04          A Stadium for Liverpool................................................................................ 272....... 26

Council in Closed Session

The following items are listed for consideration by Council in Closed Session with the public excluded, in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 1993 as listed below:

 

CONF 01    2022 Australia Day Awards

Reason:     Item CONF 01 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(a) of the Local Government Act because it contains personal matters concerning particular individuals (other than councillors).

 

 

 

 

 

CONF 02    Report back- Energy and Environmental Risk Solution (PEERS 3) Tender oucome for Large and Small Scale Energy

Reason:     Item CONF 02 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(d i) (d ii) of the Local Government Act because it contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; AND commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council.

 

CONF 03    Acquisition of  lands in Eighteenth Avenue, Cortina Avenue and Tokyo Road, Austral for drainage purposes

Reason:     Item CONF 03 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10(A)(2)(c) of the Local Government Act because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.  

Close


 

 

 

MINUTES OF THE Ordinary Meeting

HELD ON 27 October 2021

 

 

PRESENT VIA VIDEO CONFERENCING:

Mayor Wendy Waller

Councillor Ayyad (arrived at 6.08pm)

Councillor Balloot (arrived at 6.11pm)

Councillor Hadchiti

Councillor Hadid

Councillor Hagarty

Councillor Harle

Councillor Kaliyanda

Councillor Karnib

Councillor Rhodes

Councillor Shelton

Dr Eddie Jackson, Chief Executive Officer

Mr George Hampouris, Acting Director Corporate Services

Ms Tina Bono, Acting Director Community and Culture

Mr David Smith, Acting Director Compliance and Planning

Mr Peter Diplas, Acting Director City Presentation

Mr Raj Autar, Director Infrastructure and Environment

Mr John Morgan, Director, Commercial Development and Economy

Ms Jennifer Chenhall, General Counsel, Manager Governance, Legal and Procurement

Ms Ellen Whittingstall, Internal Ombudsman

Mr Vishwa Nadan, Chief Financial Officer

Mr John Milicic, Manager, Property Service

Mr David Sharman, Manager, Library and Museum Services

Mr George Georgakis, Manager Council and Executive Services

Ms Susan Ranieri, Coordinator Council and Executive Services (minutes)

 

The meeting commenced at 6.00pm.

 

 

 

STATEMENT REGARDING WEBCASTING OF MEETING

The Mayor reminded everyone that in accordance with Council’s Code of Meeting Practice the meeting is being livestreamed.

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF COUNTRY, PRAYER OF COUNCIL AND AFFIRMATION TO BE READ BY

The prayer of the Council was read by Dr Eddie Jackson, Chief Executive Officer.

 

APOLOGIES

 

Nil.

CONDOLENCES

 

Nil.

Confirmation of Minutes

 

Motion:                                  Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting held on 29 September 2021 be confirmed as a true record of that meeting.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Declarations of Interest

 

Clr Shelton declared a pecuniary interest in the following item:

 

Item:               CONF 03 Proposed Road Closure and Sale/Land Swap of part of Hanwell Serviceway and part of Elizabeth Street, Liverpool.

 

Reason:         Clr Shelton has had business dealings in the past with some of the individuals and organisations referred to in the report.

 

Clr Shelton left the virtual meeting for the duration of this item.

 

Clr Hadchiti declared a pecuniary interest in the following item:

 

Item:               PLAN 02 Quarterly Report Clause 4.6 Variations to Development Standards.

 

Reason:         Clr Hadchiti owns a property that is noted in this report.

 

Clr Hadchiti left the virtual meeting for the duration of this item.

 

 

Public Forum

Presentation – items not on agenda

Nil.

Representation – items on agenda

 

The Mayor advised that 60 submissions were received in relation to items NOM 03, CONF 01 and CONF 02 which all deal with 1 Sirius Road, Voyager Point.

 

It was noted that the submissions were forwarded to Councillors before the meeting.

 

MAYORAL MINUTE

 

Nil.


 

 

Planning & Compliance Report

 

ITEM NO:       PLAN 01

FILE NO:        307054.2021

SUBJECT:     Post Exhibition Report - Renaming of The Northern Road to Willmington Road, Luddenham

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Harle                   Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That Council:

 

1.      Note the submissions received on the renaming proposal;

 

2.      Supports the renaming of the original section of The Northern Road through Luddenham as Willmington Road; and

 

3.      Delegates authority to the Chief Executive Officer to proceed with the process of gazettal.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Clr Hadchiti left the virtual meeting at 6:07pm.

ITEM NO:       PLAN 02

FILE NO:        319652.2021

SUBJECT:     Quarterly Report - Clause 4.6 Variations to Development Standards

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Harle                   Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Clr Hadchiti returned to the virtual meeting at 6:08pm.

 

Clr Ayyad arrived to the virtual meeting at 6.08pm.

 

Corporate Services Report

 

ITEM NO:       CORP 01

FILE NO:        286674.2021

SUBJECT:     Investment Report September 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hadid                  Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CORP 02

FILE NO:        303317.2021

SUBJECT:     Tabling Annual Pecuniary Interest Returns for Councillors and Designated Persons

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.    The annual pecuniary interest returns of Councillors and designated persons, as at 30 June 2021, are now tabled before the Council in accordance with clause 4.25 of the Model Code of Conduct and available to view by making an appointment with the General Counsel;

 

2.    Governance will only make redacted copies available to the public, if requested; and

 

3.    Governance will publish a register on the Council website that will have a list of all the completed returns and trim numbers for redacted version only.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CORP 03

FILE NO:        313956.2021

SUBJECT:     NSW Grants Commission - Financial Assistance Grants Policy

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hadid                  Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CORP 04

FILE NO:        321941.2021

SUBJECT:     Council Meeting Dates - January to December 2022 and Proposed Councillor Induction Session Dates

 

COUNCIL DECISION

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That Council:

 

1.    Confirms the Council meeting time as 6.00pm and Council meeting dates for the 2022 calendar year as follows:

·      2 February 2022

·      23 February 2022

·      30 March 2022

·      27 April 2022

·      25 May 2022

·      29 June 2022

·      27 July 2022

·      31 August 2022

·      28 September 2022

·      26 October 2022

·      16 November 2022

·      14 December 2022

 

2.    Advertises the Council meeting dates and commencing times of Council meetings for the 2022 calendar year. 

 

3.    Notes the proposed program for Councillor Induction Sessions and notes that this is subject to change depending on the date of declaration of the election results.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CORP 05

FILE NO:        322724.2021

SUBJECT:     Motions for LGNSW Special Conference February - March 2022

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council endorse the motions as outlined in the report to be submitted to the Local Government NSW 2022 Special Conference.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Ayyad

 

That Council endorse the motions as outlined in the report to be submitted to the Local Government NSW 2022 Special Conference with an amendment to the motion for Climate Action Plan as follows:

 

Climate Action Plan Motion to be amended to also include 2030 and 2050. The change is highlighted in bold below:

 

MOTION

 

That LGNSW advocate for state and federal governments to adopt 2030 and 2050 climate targets and actions including net zero emission targets that are, at least, consistent with international standards.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Clr Hadchiti asked that he be recorded as having voted against the motion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Infrastructure & Environment Report

 

ITEM NO:       INF 01

FILE NO:        286324.2021

SUBJECT:     Cabramatta Creek Flying-fox Camp Management Plan

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and endorses the Cabramatta Creek Flying-fox Camp Management Plan, Final October 2018.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hadid                  Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council receives and endorses the Cabramatta Creek Flying-fox Camp Management Plan, Final October 2018.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Economy & Commercial Development Report

 

ITEM NO:       ECD 01

FILE NO:        326927.2021

SUBJECT:     TfNSW proposed Construction Lease over Council land being part Lot 5000 DP 855173 off Albemarle Place, Cecil Hills

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That the matter be deferred to the next Council meeting pending responses to the queries sought from TfNSW.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       ECD 02

FILE NO:        326936.2021

SUBJECT:     Sydney Water proposed Compulsory Acquisition of part of Lot A & Lot B DP 380884

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Shelton              Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That Council:

 

1.    Resolve that it has no objection to the compulsory acquisition of the relevant Parts of Lot A and Lot B DP 380884 Bridge Road, Liverpool by Sydney Water, on the basis that in addition to any other interests, that Council’s interest as Crown Land Manager, is addressed in the compensation determination and

 

2.    Authorises its delegated officer to execute any document, under Power of Attorney, necessary to give effect to this decision.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Committee Reports

 

ITEM NO:       CTTE 01

FILE NO:        292434.2021

SUBJECT:     Liverpool Sports Committee Minutes of meeting held 26 August 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hadid                  Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Liverpool Sports Committee meeting held on 26 August 2021.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 02

FILE NO:        301464.2021

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Community Safety and Crime Prevention Advisory Committee Meeting held on 2 September 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hadid                  Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the Minutes of the Community Safety and Crime Prevention Advisory Committee Meeting held on 2 September 2021; and

 

2.    Endorse the actions in the Minutes.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 03

FILE NO:        305839.2021

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Intermodal Precinct Committee meeting held on 6 September 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hadid                  Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

1.      Receives the minutes of the Intermodal Precinct Committee meeting held on 6 September 2021;

 

2.      Notes the following recommendation of the Committee that has been actioned:

·           Council writes to the CEO of the NSW EPA requesting attendance at a future meeting of the Intermodal Committee;

 

3.      Write to QUBE to thank them for their efforts in establishing a vaccination hub on their site, and that Council promotes the vaccination hub to the community; and

 

4.      Writes to the Secretary of the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment and the relevant Federal Infrastructure Minister responsible for the Moorebank Intermodal requesting QUBE approve Council access to the bike path located between Casula Parklands and Leacock Park.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

NOTE: As outlined in the report (on pages 157-158), Council adopted the officer recommendation not to adopt some of the Committee recommendations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 04

FILE NO:        308677.2021

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council Meeting held on 14 September 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hadid                  Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the Minutes of the Liverpool Youth Council Meeting held on 14 September 2021; and

 

2.    Endorse the recommendations in the Minutes.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 05

FILE NO:        308967.2021

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee held on 9 August 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hadid                  Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee Meeting held on 9 August 2021.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 06

FILE NO:        309995.2021

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Companion Animals Advisory Committee meeting held on 31 August 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hadid                  Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council receives and notes the minutes of the Companion Animals Advisory Committee meeting held on 31 August 2021.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CTTE 07

FILE NO:        323474.2021

SUBJECT:     Minutes of the Liverpool Pedestrian, Active Transport and Traffic Committee meeting held on 15 September 2021

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hadid                  Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council adopts the following recommendations of the Committee:

 

Item 1    Australis Avenue, Wattle Grove – Proposed Raised Pedestrian Crossing

 

·        Approves the upgrade of the existing marked crossing across Australis Avenue, Wattle Grove

·        Submits a Traffic Management Plan (TMP) to TfNSW for endorsement, for the required no right turn from Yarran Court, Wattle Grove into Australis Avenue.

·        Undertakes community consultation prior to construction.

 

Item 2    Fourth Avenue, Austral – Proposed Roundabouts and interim treatments at its intersections with Eleventh Avenue and Tenth Avenue

 

·        Approves the proposed roundabouts and associated signs and linemarking scheme.

·        Approves Stop signs interim intersection treatment at the Eleventh Avenue/Fourth Avenue intersection and re-installation of the signs and line marking at the Fourth Avenue/Tenth Avenue intersection.

·        Notes that detailed design drawings of the roundabouts and the interim intersection treatments are to be submitted to TfNSW for review prior to installation.

 

Item 3    Moorebank Avenue and Bapaume Road, Moorebank – Proposed Temporary Right Turn for Construction Access

 

·        Approves the temporary modification (for 12 months) to the Moorebank Avenue and Bapaume Road intersection, Moorebank, and associated signs and linemarking scheme.

·        Approves the internal roundabout and associated signs and line making scheme.

·        Notes that detailed design drawings and additional information including swept analysis on the temporary intersection treatment and the internal roundabout are to be submitted to TfNSW for review prior to installation.

 

 

Item 4    Liverpool City Centre High Pedestrian Activity Area, Liverpool – Proposed Treatments

 

·        Approves four entry and one midblock treatment and associated regulatory signs and linemarking scheme.

·        Notes that detailed design drawings are to be forwarded to TfNSW and Police for review prior to installation.

 

Item 5    Wilson Road and Hinchinbrook Road Intersection, Hinchinbrook – Proposed Roundabout modification

 

·        Approves the modification to the existing splitter islands and installation of raised thresholds across the Hinchinbrook Drive and Partridge Avenue approaches at the intersection.

·        Notes that detailed design be forwarded to TfNSW and Police for review prior to installation.

 

Item 6    Middleton Drive, Middleton Grange – Proposed Pedestrian Refuge

 

·        Approves installation of a pedestrian refuge in Middleton Drive, Middleton Grange, north of Bird Walton Avenue.

 

Item 7    Wonga Road, Lurnea - Proposed Raised Pedestrian Crossing

 

·        Approves upgrade of the existing marked crossing to a raised threshold along with associated signs and linemarking scheme.

 

Item 8    Fifteenth Avenue and Fourth Avenue intersection, Austral – Proposed roundabout modification

 

·        Approves installation of raised thresholds across the four approach lanes at the Fifteenth Avenue and Fourth Avenue roundabout.

·        Notes that prior to installation of the raised threshold across the Fifteenth Avenue (western leg) and Fourth Avenue (southern leg) approaches, vehicle classification is be carried out and results discussed with TfNSW.

 

Item 9    Fifteenth Avenue and Craik Avenue intersection, Austral – Traffic Management Plan for Proposed Right Turn Restrictions

 

·        Submits the required Transport Management Plan to TfNSW for endorsement, to restrict right turn movement at the Fifteenth Avenue and Craik Avenue intersection, Austral.

 

 

Item 10  Sergeant Street, Edmondson Park – Proposed Temporary Road Closure for Outdoor Dining

 

·        Approves temporary road closure of Sergeant Street to through traffic from November 2021 to March 2022.

·        Notes the required Transport Management Plan is to be submitted to TfNSW for endorsement.

·        Notes that delegated approval will be sought for required changes to the existing signposting.

 

Item 11  Items Approved Under Delegated Authority.

 

·        Approves the works approved under the delegated approval process.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Questions with Notice

 

ITEM NO:       QWN 01

FILE NO:        320547.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Community Sport

 

Background

 

Many of our local community sporting clubs have been heavily impacted for two seasons due to the COVID-19 pandemic and shutdown of community sport.

 

Clubs have lost players who haven't returned and they've also lost significant canteen and fundraising receipts.

 

Community sport is also a proven way to boost ones physical and mental well-being.

If it can be done in a COVID safe way, it should be allowed.

 

Questions

 

Please address the following:

 

1.      Is there any indication as to when community sport will return?

 

2.    What engagement and advocacy has Council undertaken with sporting bodies and the State Government for a return to community sport?

 

Response

 

1.    The NSW State Governments Roadmap to Freedom outlines an in-principle plan for the return to community sport that is broadly based around the achievement of state-based vaccination milestones.  In summary:

i.     At 70% vaccination rates outdoor gatherings are permissible in groups of less than twenty (20) persons.  NSW Office of Sport have advised that this ruling allows sporting groups to commence some activities where all persons including coaches and administrators are fully vaccinated.  At this stage full club training and competition is not able to commence. 

ii.     At 80% vaccination rates community sport can recommence training for fully vaccinated persons with some restrictions.  This allows sports clubs to commence training and competitive activity for fully vaccinated person, those holding medical exemptions and children under the age of 16.  Council expects that NSW will reach the 80% vaccination rate on 15 October 2021.

 

iii.    On December 1, 2021 the road map proposes that all Community Sport can recommence for all persons irrespective of vaccination rates.

 

While the roadmap outlines the milestones for the re-emergence of sporting activity, Council continues to work with sporting organisations and associations to determine how clubs can apply this ruling for registrations, how to administer strategies for spectators and non-playing persons.  Under the NSW Health Guidelines, all Sporting Clubs are required to apply their own COVID safe plan that is relevant for both the sporting code and venue.

 

2.    Council has maintained close contact with major state sporting organisations, NSW Office of Sport and other peak industry bodies to both provide local representation and to ensure that up to date information can be provided to clubs accordingly. 

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 02

FILE NO:        320550.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Harle - Pearce Park

 

Background

 

Pearce Park, an overgrown unused area located at the rear of Councils’ Rose Street Depot, has been used to store a range of waste materials including road base, concrete rubble, building waste and similar materials originating from several Liverpool CBD sites. Included in the waste are several large diameter concrete stormwater pipes scattered throughout the overgrown area. These pipes appear to be used as a “rough sleeper area” and a gathering place by groups of people that may be homeless. This activity. especially under current Covid restrictions, may pose a significant health risk to themselves and anyone that may enter the area especially unaccompanied children.

Questions:

Please address the following:

 

1.    Is Council aware of the use of these pipes as “rough sleeping areas” or homeless people?

 

2.    What plans does Council have for any future use and rehabilitation of the overall area?

 

3.    What are the estimated costs of carrying out remediation works?

 

Response

 

1.    Is Council aware of the use of these pipes as “rough sleeping areas” or homeless people?

 

As co-convenor of the Fairfield/Liverpool Homelessness Interagency (a shared responsibility with Fairfield City Council), Council works closely with a number of key sector services and government agencies to coordinate responses to reports of rough sleepers in Liverpool. Part of this approach includes providing weekly updates to the Department of Communities and Justice (DCJ) to support their Assertive Outreach Patrols. Representatives from DCJ conduct twice-weekly Assertive Outreach patrols to known rough sleeper locations to offer support and assistance.

 

At the time of this question Pearce Park was not identified as a known rough sleeper location in Liverpool. However, this location was reported to the Department of Communities and Justice (DCJ) on 24 September 2021 for inclusion in their Assertive Outreach Patrols. On 1 October 2021 this report was followed up with DCJ with a request to provide feedback to Council on the result of the patrol once it has occurred, including whether any individuals were sighted and if so, were engaged and support offered. The DCJ have confirmed that due to isolation of the site, this request was referred to their local access team to investigate, hence the delay in the process.

 

The DCJ patrol on 12 and 14 October 2021 advise that no rough sleepers were sighted at Pearce Park. The patrol officers advise the concrete pipes are believed to be too small for someone to sleep in. They advised of signs of drinking activity but not believed to be street sleeping. Council will be requesting the DCJ continue to monitor Pearce Park for the next few weeks to confirm whether any rough sleepers are at this location so they can be assisted. This information will be shared with Councillors once received.

 

Council’s Asbestos Assessment Officer inspected the site to identify possible remediation works required at this location and collected a sample of the stormwater pipe material to determine if it contained asbestos. Whilst some bedding and clothing was noticed, there were no individuals present at the site at the time of inspection.

 

The result from the sample analysis (received on 7 October 2021), confirmed the presence of asbestos containing material. Given the positive asbestos result, Council is awaiting new advice from DCJ to inform and relocate any rough sleepers that may be living at the site as soon as practicable. Following the relocation of any rough sleepers from this area, Council will remove the asbestos stormwater pipe and any other building waste material.

 

2.    What plans does Council have for any future use and rehabilitation of the overall area?

 

In the short term, the City Presentation Team will continue to spray for noxious weeds in the turf area and address safety issues as part of the Parks Team regular program of works.

 

In the mid to long term, City Presentation operations and facilities are being reviewed with a strategy to upgrade to a state-of-the-art depot in line with the growth of the LGA. Council is reviewing options for the Rose Street Depot, Western Depot and possibly a Western Western Depot closer to the new airport. A further report will be submitted to Council for consideration when further details are available.

 

3.    What are the estimated costs of carrying out remediation works?

 

Soil contamination investigations will be undertaken at the park in early 2022 to understand the sub surface soil conditions and start planning for any required remediation work. The costs for the remediation work will be determined following the completion of soil investigations.

 

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 03

FILE NO:        320555.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Rhodes - Impacts of NSW Health Work orders on homeowners issued with Council Works Orders and their ability to comply

 

Please address the following:

 

1.    What are the impacts of COVID NSW Health work restrictions on Council Order timeframes on individual homes that possibly affect homeowners’ ability to comply?

 

2.    How many illegal works orders have been issued on Liverpool homeowners whilst Liverpool is, or has been under NSW Health Work restrictions?

 

3.    How many fines have been issued to homeowners because they have been unable to comply with Council Works Orders issued against their homes, during the time Liverpool has been under NSW Health Work restrictions?

 

4.    Has Council changed its procedure in order to consider the NSW Health Order restrictions on homeowners’ ability to be able to comply with Council Works Orders time frames when issuing Council Work Orders on private homes and if so, how?

 

Response

 

1.    What are the impacts of COVID NSW Health work restrictions on Council Order time frames on individual homes that possibly affect homeowner’s ability to comply?

 

Council ceased issuing notices/orders on 16 July 2021 including the issuing of warning letters on outstanding orders. Council’s Compliance & Regulatory staff recommenced inspections and compliance action from 1 September 2021, in line with the easing of restrictions on construction work.

 

2.    How many illegal works orders have been issued on Liverpool homeowners whilst Liverpool is, or has been under NSW Health Work restrictions?

 

As outlined above, Council ceased issuing notices/orders on 16 July 2021 including the issuing of warning letters on outstanding orders Since inspections and compliance action recommenced on 1 September 2021, 4 notices/orders have been issued at the time of writing this response.

 

 

 

 

 

3.    How many fines have been issued to homeowners because they have been unable to comply with Council Works Orders issued against their homes, during the time Liverpool has been under NSW Health Work restrictions?

 

Nil.

 

4.    Has Council changed its procedure in order to consider the NSW Health Order restrictions on homeowners’ ability to be able to comply with Council Works Orders time frames when issuing Council Work Orders on private homes and if so how?

 

Council ceased issuing notices/orders on 16 July 2021 including the issuing of warning letters on outstanding orders. Anyone issued with a Notice can make representations to Council and extensions of time are considered on a case-by-case basis.

 

Motion                              Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Harle

 

That a report be brought to Council on possible COVID Policy and procedure for Council orders, fines and/or other legal matters that addresses situations where Public Health Orders and/or State or Federal restrictions make it impossible for constituents to carry out the orders, or within timeframes addressed in the Council orders as a result of a pandemic

placed restrictions.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 04

FILE NO:        320559.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Kaliyanda - Growth of African Olives and Other Invasive Weed Species

 

Please address the following:

 

1.    What approach does Council currently have toward the management of the African Olive, and other invasive weed species in Leacock Regional Park, and other parks and green spaces in Liverpool?


Response


Leacock Regional Park is the tenure of National Parks and Wildlife Services.

 

Council’s management of invasive weed species varies depending on the category of land. Informed by the Biosecurity Act 2015 and regional plans of management, Council takes a risk management approach to the control of pest species, which balances management objectives with cost effectiveness.  

 

Much of Council’s approach to weed management can be classified as asset protection, containing existing threats and prioritising those that impact the function of a given asset. High priority weeds, particularly those emerging in the region, have been identified for eradication (e.g., Frogbit).

 

With regards to natural assets, such as bushland and waterways, Council has a number of operational programs targeting weeds. Council’s Aquatic Weed Program targets a suite of species that impede recreational use and impact ecosystem functions in Council waterways. The Environment Restoration Plan (ERP) program works to restore and maintain areas of high conservation value. Weed management forms a significant part of these activities; however, it is limited to established ERP sites.

 

Weed treatments on Council’s remaining natural assets take a reactive management approach in response to Councillor and Customer Requests. Whenever possible, Council officers leverage grant funding opportunities to target an area of concern or add value to existing approaches.

 

Where Council actively manages weeds, such as African Olive, priority is given to areas of high conservation value. These areas have remnant native vegetation and greatest capacity to regenerate following removal of weeds. Areas with significant infestations require a greater input of resources to effectively restore than more resilient areas. Where large infestations are treated, best practice requires a staged ‘mosaic’ approach to the removal of weeds, ensuring there is adequate habitat for fauna and that soil stability is maintained. This also ensures that no area is over cleared.

 

Council is currently developing an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) policy and strategy which will provide priorities and guidance on the management of weeds and other pests.  The draft IPM policy was presented to the June 2021 Council meeting.  A draft IPM strategy is due to be presented to the February 2022 Council meeting.

2.    What resources are currently allocated to manage the problem and prevent these invasive weed species from impacting the natural biodiversity of the area, especially in the ever-reducing Cumberland Plain Woodland?


Response


The on-ground management of Council’s environmental assets falls under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Operations Unit of City Presentation.

 

Council’s Biosecurity Officer is primarily responsible for the execution of relevant biosecurity duties, which include priority weed control and investigation of high-risk pathways. The biosecurity portfolio also delivers the Aquatic Weeds Program, with an annual operating budget of $40,000. Council leverages Weed Action Plan grant funding for the delivery of the Kei Apple Eradication Program.

 

The ERP program is a package of projects and programs, funded by Council’s Environment Levy permanent special rates variation, for the improvement of Liverpool’s natural environment for the long-term benefit of the community. The ERP program manages approximately 200ha of bushland. Projects are managed by a dedicated project officer. The on-ground works component consists of a series of ecological restoration projects and their subsequent management by Council’s ERP Bush Regeneration team. The ERP program engages two bush regeneration teams totalling 8 staff for the ongoing management of ERP sites. Projects featuring the targeted removal of African Olive in the Casula locality have been included in the last two rounds of ERP projects.

 

Council does not have a dedicated officer for the management of natural assets. Reactive management of these areas is programmed by Coordinator Environment Operations. Reactive works cost $270,000 in the 2020-2021 financial year. This has included short term treatments for African Olive and exotic vines in waterways and all other natural areas and environmental operational issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.    Is the current level of allocated resources sufficient to adequately address the issue?


Response


It is important to note that weed management is an ongoing process. Ecological restoration can take upwards of 20 years to remediate degraded bushland when actively managed. Adequate resourcing depends on the management outcomes sought for a particular area or weed species, and the extent and severity of weed infestations.

 

The responsibilities of Council as a land manager are identified in the Local Government Act 1993 and described core business. Other legislation, such as the Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016 and Biosecurity Act 2015, identifies additional statutory requirements of land managers for the conservation of biodiversity and the management of invasive species.

 

The Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) requires Council to prepare Plans of Management (PoM) for land under its care and control, determining the use and management objectives for a given location, and set service standards for those areas. This defines the performance targets and operating budget.

 

Natural Area is one category of community land identified under the Act and pertains to areas of conservation value. This includes bushland, watercourses, and wetlands. With a few exceptions, the majority of Council’s environmental assets fall under a Generic Plan of Management for Parks. As such, the management objectives for Natural Areas identified under the Act are not applicable, and service standards are inadequate. Those sites that are exceptions have a site-specific PoM, where Natural Areas are identified on a portion of the site. However, these plans are generally out of date and operational management programs have not been developed to achieve the stated objectives.

 

The reliance on reactive management is a product of incorrect categorisation and lack of governance for these assets. Reactive management does not satisfy core business objectives for the management on these assets, as defined by the Act, and does not produce long-term biodiversity gains.

 

The ERP Bushland Project Officer manages the delivery of the ERP ecological restoration projects using contractors due to the intensity, frequency, and seasonal nature of the works. Projects are identified and budgeted for within the operating budget afforded by the Environment Levy.  Two of the eight bush regenerator positions are temporarily vacant. With the ERP program limited to established ERP sites, it has been possible to scale up resourcing over time as new sites are added. It is noted that the ERP program constitutes a prescribed set of outputs that sit outside Council’s core business. While the objectives align, the ERP program and the Environment Levy were not established to satisfy core business delivery. The Environment Levy provides adequate resourcing for the ERP program.

 

Resourcing is considered adequate for the current service standard, though this is below stakeholder expectations and statutory requirements. Without dedicated officers and operational funding, it is not possible to address the issue in a way that would be deemed satisfactory. Without Plans of Management and an operational management program it is not possible to systematically and effectively reduce the presence of a broad spectrum of weeds and improve the conservation outcomes of Council’s environmental assets.

 

Operational management of natural areas includes weed treatment as an activity. However, this is undertaken holistically and typically without regards to priority weed concerns. Priority pest programs are another layer of management that target a particular species for management. The aquatic weed program in the biosecurity portfolio is an example of this.

 

The Biosecurity Officer role is a dedicated position, though it covers all public and private land within the LGA. The position has a limited operating budget and relies on external funding opportunities to build capacity. Programs are restricted to a limited number of priority species. The current capacity satisfies statutory requirements but does not represent best practice or align with community expectation.

 

The IPM policy and strategy that is currently being developed will consider a range of weed and pest animal species that may be suitable for a priority pest management program.

 

City Presentation is in the process of reviewing operational expectations and resourcing requirements of the Parks and Open Spaces business unit. The review and recommendations are expected to be completed in six months.

 

4.    How does Council interact with other levels of government, agencies and volunteer groups in relation to this issue?

 

Response

 

Council officers work with relevant stakeholders and agencies, and with all levels of government.

 

Council works with Local Land Services and Department of Primary Industry on biosecurity matters, particularly managing new incursions. Council works with Department of Planning Infrastructure and Environment on matters pertaining to biodiversity conservation.

 

Council is actively involved in the regional Weed Committee.

 

Council and its officers are active members of the Georges Riverkeeper Combined Councils Catchment Management Group. Council receives support in return for its participation, including weed control and litter collection.

 

The ERP program facilitates the Environment Volunteer Program, consisting of 10 groups of volunteers that meet monthly to undertake weed control on their local bushland areas. Weed management techniques are limited in scope due to lack of vocational qualification and restrictions on the use of power tools and pesticides.

 

Council applies to external agencies for grant funding opportunities when they arise.

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 05

FILE NO:        320567.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Kaliyanda - Disaster Preparation Tool

 

Background

 

A new geospatial tool has been released, designed to help councils prepare for severe weather events while supporting recovery and expediting insurance claims. Developed by analytics provider Nearmap, the tool looks to map every major natural disaster that impacts property, infrastructure and communities in the country. More than 6,200 square kilometres of disaster-affected land, including Cyclone Seroja, the Perth Hills fires and the NSW floods have already been captured. The tool has been developed in collaboration with government agencies and disaster relief organisations.

 

Please address the following:

 

1.    Is Council aware of this tool?

 

Response

 

Council is aware of Nearmap’s Impact Response geospatial tool feature.  The tool is a “Post-Catastrophe” program to capture imagery in the aftermath of natural disasters.

 

The images are captured by services flown by Nearmap however in accordance with Nearmap terms they will not fly in certain adverse conditions such as bad weather and thick smoke.  The geospatial tool does not provide assurances of the timing of images, when the image will be captured (post-disaster) or even if an event will be covered. Capturing the images will depend on the scale of the impact on the community, infrastructure and property, as well as the official declaration of a "disaster" or "emergency" by the state or federal government.

 

Council is currently a Nearmap subscriber.  The cost for this add on feature (Post-Catastrophe program) is $5,300.00 (excl GST) per year, which would provide Council with the imagery (if available) 30 days before it is released to all Nearmap subscribers.

 

In relation to disaster preparedness and mitigating the impacts there would be very few advantages gained with the Post-Catastrophe program as it is not an early warning system. The system could provide some benefit by comparing imagery of a site or location pre-event to post-event for desktop impact assessment. However, this imagery would be available post 30 days as an existing Nearmap subscriber.  A review of the geospatial tool offered by Nearmap and the additional annual cost, it is not recommended as the best option for the Council as a tool for disaster preparation and mitigating the impacts of severe weather events.  

 

 

The Local Emergency Management Officer (LEMO) is working with NSW Government Spatial Services and the Emergency Information Coordination Unit (EICU) who are also involved in the whole of government imagery capture.  This service includes imagery flown by Spatial Services, imagery available from tasked satellites, and imagery captured by Nearmap.  As an Emergency Management Agency and through the LEMO, the EICU will provide Council with access to this imagery. 

 

2.    If so, how will this be integrated with Council’s existing policies and measures in relation to disaster preparation and mitigating the impacts of severe weather events.

 

Response

 

In the last 2 years, Council has experienced severe weather events including, bushfires, major flooding and most recently, the COVID-19 pandemic. All the events have resulted in an increased focus on councils being "resilient ready." Council is looking at several critical and strategic initiatives to enhance and evolve Council’s disaster preparedness, risk mitigation, resilience planning and emergency response operations. The initiatives include:

 

Creation and appointing of an FTE Local Emergency Management Officer (LEMO)

 

The LEMO role has transformed in recent years, with an increased workload and additional responsibilities, including being on-call on a 24/7 basis. In relation to governance, the LEMO function is bound by the requirements of the state and regional Emergency Management Plans (EMPLANs) and other supporting plans. Currently, the LEMO function is an auxiliary role to the Director of City Presentation. This makes it extremely demanding on both business-as-usual workloads and emergency management functions, particularly time-critical events. To provide greater capability and capacity in emergency management operations and disaster preparedness initiates to support the community, a full-time LEMO position reporting to the Director City Presentation is required. The 2021/2022 budget made financial provisions for the appointment of a full time LEMO however, due to the ongoing pandemic situation, to date no appointment has been made.


 

 

Multi-Agency cooperation and alignment

 

Critical to the success of the Council’s local emergency management planning (disaster preparedness and subsequent emergency response operation) is a collaborative synchronizing multi-agency practice managed through the Local Emergency Management Committee (LEMC).

 

 

As chairperson, the LEMO coordinates and leads the LEMC working with the Regional Emergency Management Officer, NSW Police, Transport for NSW, NSW Health, Fire and Rescue, SES, and the Rural Fire Service. On occasions with state-wide declared disasters, the State Emergency Operation Command is stood up and leads the support at a state level. There are also other stakeholders that can contribute an understanding of local resources, vulnerabilities, and networks, such as local council representatives in community and environmental services.

 

The flood response in March 2021 and the recent experience the COVID lockdown provision placed on Liverpool and the surrounding LGA’s, reinforced the need and benefit to maintain these relationships on an ongoing basis outside of the critical response setting.

 

For example, from lessons learnt reviews in the aftermath of the flood disaster experience, this event highlighted new initiatives required such, as a dedicated Council Liaison Officer being embedded within SES operations during emergency response operations.

 

The LEMC multi-agency alliance is critical for supporting Council’s early warning systems as well as emergency management operations and is an essential function of the LEMO to build and maintain these relationships constantly.

 

Build Internal Capacity and Capability

 

The Council must continue to develop the capability and capacity for emergency management by increasing the awareness across the organisation with internal local emergency management teams. The Critical Incident Response Team (CIRT) currently plays an important role in raising awareness and making decisions during emergency events.

 

However, as an emergency response support agency, Council will need to undertake an audit of its emergency management operations to ensure it has the resources and trained staff to undertake emergency management operations and effectively support the LEMC. Training and Development of staff in emergency management principles and operations will benefit the organisation. Additional resources for surge capacity will also assist in integrating Council's existing policies and measures in disaster preparation and mitigating the impacts of severe weather events and emergency operations.

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       QWN 06

FILE NO:        332408.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Hagarty - Private Investigators

 

Please address the following:

 

1.    Does Council use private investigators?

 

2.    If so, in what capacity?

 

A response to these questions will be provided in the business papers for the Council meeting of 24 November 2021.

 


 

Presentations by Councillors

 

Nil.

 

 

 


Notices of Motion

 

ITEM NO:       NOM 01

FILE NO:        331569.2021

SUBJECT:     Recycle waste without having to separate waste at point of collection

 

Background

 

The significant difference claimed in recycling of waste proposed in the SSD development in Shoalhaven LGA is that there is no need for separation Collection which benefits in a simplification of the waste collection process that relieves the individual decision making and guess work by individual constituents on how to go about throwing away all the different types of waste such as plastic bottles with a metal cap, paper stuck to its side and some ketchup still inside which necessitates education of the masses and delivers questionable results.

 

Benefits claimed are:

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Waste collection operators can decrease the amount of bins and trucks in circulation for collection because of the one Simple collection of municipal solid waste which appears to offer a cost saving with:

·     Less money spent on the number of bins required;

·     Less money spent on truck movements reducing traffic congestion and traffic pollution;

·     Less money spent educating the masses on what has to go into what bin; and

·     Less contamination issues that is a result of people not doing the right thing.

 

The Shoalhaven State Significant Development proposes:

·     That 96% is saved from landfill;

·     Recycling: glass, plastics, metals, minerals, fuels (rdf/srf) and biomass to be used as fertilizer or fuel with a remaining 4% destined to landfill;

·     The process is odourless, and it does not include any incineration processes; and

·     Biomass is widely used: as an agricultural fertilizer, a base for the fermentation process or as a fuel (SRF). Laboratory tests have also confirmed its potential as a substrate for the production of hydrogen or for the production of building materials.

 

The current progress of the SSD in Shoalhaven LGA Boielektra development.

 

The commencement of Stage 1 works is awaiting construction certificate (CC). We have been advised by the DPIE that CC will be issued by the end of this week. This will allow us to commence the demolition and clearing of the site as per Stage 1 approval.

 

The Stage 2 Development Application is a State Significant Development (SSD) and is currently under assessment by the Department of Planning.

 

The public exhibition period of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and accompanying documents closed on Monday 12th of July 2021. As a result, 11 submissions were received from the public, organisations and public authorities.

(https://www.planningportal.nsw.gov.au/major-projects/project/10271).

 

WaterNSW, the Biodiversity and Conservation Division of DPIE, Roads and Maritime Service, Transport for NSW, Crown Lands, Heritage NSW, and the public submission support the development as drafted.

 

Fire and Rescue NSW, Shoalhaven City Council, Environmental Protection Authority and Endeavour Energy either asked for additional information or provided recommendations on specific conditions to incorporate in the final approval.

 

Bioelektra have prepared a Response to Submissions which will be provided to DPIE in October 2021. The response will also be provided to stakeholders to confirm that their concerns have been addressed, prior to issuing any approvals and finalising the approval conditions.

 

Shoalhaven Council have communicated that they are comfortable with the way the process is progressing and the responses to technical matters related to the development by Bioelektra and expects that appropriate Consent Conditions will be available shortly after the RTS report is submitted.

 

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Rhodes)

 

That Council bring back to the November Council Meeting a report that considers and compares any possible advantage or disadvantage between waste recycling procedures that either separate waste at point of pick up similar to what we have now and those that do not separate waste at point of pick up from homes, similar to technologies offered through Bioelektra as an example who is currently engaged in a State Significant Development recycling waste in a “joint” project with Shoalhaven City Council.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       NOM 02

FILE NO:        332239.2021

SUBJECT:     Support for Fairy Glen at Harris Creek

 

Background

 

At the September 2021, I presented a petition of over 770 residents seeking Council support for a Fairy Glen initiative along Harris Creek Reserve. Council accepted the petition at this meeting.

 

Since then, Council officers have been communicating with representatives from the community to consider issues relating to compliance, governance, the environment and other factors to determine the best way forward in supporting this initiative.

 

This has been met with wide support from the community who see the initiative as an effect way to lift our collective spirits following what has been a very difficult time for our region.

 

This motion acknowledges the work that Council staff have done so far and seeks Council support for a Fairy Glen initiative along Harris Creek Reserve.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Kaliyanda)

 

That Council:

 

1.    Formally support the development of a Fairy Glen at Harris Creek Reserve.

 

2.    Continue to work with the representatives identified by the authors of the petition at the September 2021 Council Meeting to determine the best way forward in practically supporting this initiative.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Kaliyanda           Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

1.      Formally support in principle the development of a Fairy Glen at Harris Creek Reserve where there are no environmental conflicts;

 

2.      Continue to engage with the community to further explore the proposal, discuss opportunities and constraints, the residents’ capacity to manage the activity and Council’s role and potential levels of support. Provide a report back to the November Council meeting in regards to the further investigation and assessment of Council; and

 

3.      To communicate details of this initiative across Liverpool Council’s social media and website.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       NOM 03

FILE NO:        332584.2021

SUBJECT:     1 Sirius Road, Voyager Point

 

Background

 

1 Sirius Road, Voyager Point is currently for sale.

 

This and neighbouring Lots 68 and 75 have significant environmental value and are unique examples of an intact wetland ecosystem in Liverpool. The entire site includes almost 10 hectares of prime koala habitat.

 

There is already approval for one house and there are significant concerns in the community about the potential for further development to take place at the site.

 

The site is currently zoned E3 Environmental Management and is also mapped as ‘Environmentally Significant Land’ in the LEP.

 

The area is also identified in the draft Cumberland Plain Conservation Plan as a Strategic Conservation Area.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Hagarty)

 

That Council:

 

1.    Notes that 1, Lot 68 and Lot 75 Sirius Road, Voyager Point:

·      have significant environmental value;

·      are prime koala habitat; and

·      are unique examples of an intact wetland ecosystem in Liverpool.

 

2.    Reaffirms its commitment to the protection of the site through E3 Environmental Management zoning and its designation as Environmentally Significant Land in the LEP.

 

3.    Writes to the State Government in support of the site’s designation as a Strategic Conservation Area.

 

This item was moved to be dealt with in Closed Session in conjunction with CONF 01 and CONF 02 which also related to 1 Sirius Road, Voyager Point.

 

This item is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993 because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.


ITEM NO:       NOM 04

FILE NO:        332392.2021

SUBJECT:     Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC)

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Hagarty)

 

That Council notes:

 

·     The Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) was established by the New South Wales Government in 1988 in response to growing community concerns about the integrity of public administration in the state; and

 

·     Its strong support for an independent organisation to protect the public interest, prevent breaches of public trust and guide the conduct of MPs, Councillors and public officials in the NSW public sector.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Kaliyanda

 

That the recommendation be adopted.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       NOM 05

FILE NO:        333706.2021

SUBJECT:     Greater Sydney Parklands Trust Bill

 

Background

 

In July last year, the Berejiklian government announced it will fold the Centennial Park and Moore Park, Parramatta Park and the Western Sydney Parklands trusts into a new super trust, the Greater Sydney Parklands Trust.

 

The government have now released a Draft Exposure Bill on the Greater Sydney Parklands Trust. The Bill is on public exhibition until October 29. If it goes ahead, the Bill will grant the Greater Sydney Parklands Agency sweeping powers to further over-commercialise Sydney's open spaces.

 

Western Sydney Parklands were a sanctuary for many during lockdown and they must be protected.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Hagarty)

 

That Council write to the State Government requesting:

·     a four week extension to the consultation period for the Draft Exposure Bill on the Greater Sydney Parklands Trust; and

·     a briefing for Councillors on the Draft Bill and its impact on the Western Sydney Parklands.

 

UPDATED NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Hagarty)

 

That Council:

 

·           Makes a submission on the Greater Sydney Parklands Trust Bill that includes:

o    Consideration be given to establishing a specific Community Trustee Board for Western Sydney Parklands (rather than a group that covers a number of different parklands) and that a Council representative be appointed to that Board.

o    Use Council’s social media platforms and Council’s website to advise the community about the proposed changes of the management of Western Sydney Parklands under the proposed Greater Sydney Parklands Bill and encourage public submissions on the “Bill”.

 

·           Request:

o    A four week extension to the consultation period for the Draft Exposure Bill on the Greater Sydney Parklands Trust; and

o    A briefing for Councillors on the Draft Bill and its impact on the Western Sydney Parklands.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hagarty              Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

·           Makes a submission on the Greater Sydney Parklands Trust Bill that includes:

o    Consideration be given to establishing a specific Community Trustee Board for Western Sydney Parklands (rather than a group that covers a number of different parklands) and that a Council representative be appointed to that Board.

o    Use Council’s social media platforms and Council’s website to advise the community about the proposed changes of the management of Western Sydney Parklands under the proposed Greater Sydney Parklands Bill and encourage public submissions on the “Bill”.

o    Safeguards that any income generated from Western Sydney Parklands is spent on Western Sydney Parklands.

 

  • Request:

o    A four week extension to the consultation period for the Draft Exposure Bill on the Greater Sydney Parklands Trust; and

o    A briefing for Councillors on the Draft Bill and its impact on the Western Sydney Parklands.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 


 

RECESS

 

Mayor Waller advised that Council would now move into Closed Session to deal with Items CONF 01, CONF 02, CONF 03, CONF 04, CONF 05, CONF 06, CONF 07 and NOM 03 pursuant to the provisions of S10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993 because:

 

·           CONF 01 Question with Notice Clr Harle 1 Sirius Road, Voyager Point is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(c) (g) of the Local Government Act 1993 because it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business; AND advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

 

·           CONF 02 - Sirius Road, Voyager Point, CONF 03 - Proposed Road Closure and Sale/Land Swap of part of Hanwell Serviceway and part of Elizabeth Street, Liverpool, CONF 06 – Maintenance of Council’s On and Off Street Parking Machines and NOM 03 1 Sirius Road, Voyager Point are confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993 because they contain information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

·           CONF 04 - Legal Affairs Report 1 July 2021 to 30 September 2021 is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(g) of the Local Government Act 1993 because it contains advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

 

·           CONF 05 Update on Interim Heritage Order at 10 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(b) of the Local Government Act 1993 because it contains matters concerning the personal hardship of any resident or ratepayer.

 

·           CONF 07 RCL3070 Supply of Library Materials is confidential pursuant to the provisions of s10A(2)(d i), (dii), and (diii) of the Local Government Act 1993 because it contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; AND commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; AND commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed reveal a trade secret. Before moving into Closed Session, Mayor Waller called a short recess at 6:54pm.

 

RESUMPTION OF MEETING

 

Mayor Waller resumed the meeting in Closed Session at 6.58pm with all Councillors present.


 

 

Confidential Items

ITEM NO:       CONF 01

FILE NO:        332384.2021

SUBJECT:     Question with Notice - Clr Harle - 1 Sirius Road Voyager Point

 

Questions and responses with regards to 1 Sirius Road, Voyager Point were provided to Councillors in a Confidential Book.

 

Questions and responses were confidential in accordance with s10A(2)(c) (g) of the Local Government Act 1993 because they contain information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business; AND advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

 

 

CONF 01 and CONF 02 were discussed concurrently. The resolution is shown under CONF 02 on the next page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CONF 02

FILE NO:        334244.2021

SUBJECT:     Sirius Road, Voyager Point

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Harle                   Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.      Investigates funding sources, including through State and Federal Government programs, for the purchase of all land north of Sirius Road, Voyager Point currently zoned E3 Environment Management;

 

2.      Approves the necessary funding to obtain an independent valuation of the three parcels of land zoned E3 Environmental Management;

 

3.      Notes that a further report will be brought back to Council upon completion of the valuations and funding investigations to confirm if funding is available to proceed with offers for purchase;

 

4.      Investigates rezoning 1 Sirius Road and Lots 68 and 75 Sirius Road, Voyager Point from E3 Environmental Management to E2 Environmental Conservation if it’s purchased by a public authority;

 

5.      Subject to point 4, directs the CEO to prepare a planning proposal to rezone 1 Sirius Road and Lots 68 and 75 Sirius Road, Voyager Point to E2 Environmental Conservation;

 

6.      Notes that any planning proposal is required to be considered by the Liverpool Local Planning Panel before a decision by Council on whether to endorse the planning proposal for a Gateway determination by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment;

 

7.      Writes to the State Government in support of the site’s designation as a Strategic Conservation Area;

 

8.      Write to the NSW Minister for the Environment requesting consideration to be given to the NSW Government purchasing the properties identified in this report for inclusion in the NSW National Park estate or as a nature reserve; and

 

9.      Send the petition along with other representations to the State Government.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.


ITEM NO:       NOM 03

FILE NO:        332584.2021

SUBJECT:     1 Sirius Road, Voyager Point

 

Background

 

1 Sirius Road, Voyager Point is currently for sale.

 

This and neighbouring Lots 68 and 75 have significant environmental value and are unique examples of an intact wetland ecosystem in Liverpool. The entire site includes almost 10 hectares of prime koala habitat.

 

There is already approval for one house and there are significant concerns in the community about the potential for further development to take place at the site.

 

The site is currently zoned E3 Environmental Management and is also mapped as ‘Environmentally Significant Land’ in the LEP.

 

The area is also identified in the draft Cumberland Plain Conservation Plan as a Strategic Conservation Area.

 

NOTICE OF MOTION (submitted by Clr Hagarty)

 

That Council:

 

1.    Notes that 1, Lot 68 and Lot 75 Sirius Road, Voyager Point:

·      have significant environmental value;

·      are prime koala habitat; and

·      are unique examples of an intact wetland ecosystem in Liverpool.

 

2.    Reaffirms its commitment to the protection of the site through E3 Environmental Management zoning and its designation as Environmentally Significant Land in the LEP.

 

3.    Writes to the State Government in support of the site’s designation as a Strategic Conservation Area.

 

This motion was withdrawn as it was dealt with in conjunction with CONF 02 (see resolution on previous page).

 

 


Clr Shelton left the virtual meeting at 7:24pm.

ITEM NO:       CONF 03

FILE NO:        313473.2021

SUBJECT:     Proposed Road Closure and Sale/Land Swap of part of Hanwell Serviceway and part of Elizabeth Street, Liverpool

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Harle                   Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council:

 

1.    Approves the commencement of a road closure process of part of Hanwell Serviceway and part of Macquarie Street/Elizabeth Street, Liverpool as outlined in the confidential report;

 

2.    Notes, that a public notification process which also involves the notification of relevant service authorities and NSW Crown lands will be undertaken;

 

3.    Approves to classify the land compromising any area of closed road area as “Operational” land pursuant to s.43 of the Roads Act 1993;

 

4.    Authorises the CEO or his delegated officer to execute any documents, under Power of Attorney, necessary to give effect to this decision;

 

5.    Resolves that a further report be made to Council upon completion of the road closure consultation process, prior to any proposed sale or land/swap progressing; and

 

6.    Keeps this report confidential pursuant to the provisions of Section 10A(2)(c ) of the Local Government Act 1993 as this information would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 


ITEM NO:       CONF 04

FILE NO:        323517.2021

SUBJECT:     Legal Affairs Report - 1 July 2021 to 30 September 2021

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the report concerning the legal affairs of Liverpool City Council.

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Harle                   Seconded: Clr Rhodes

 

That Council receives and notes the report concerning the legal affairs of Liverpool City Council.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CONF 05

FILE NO:        315813.2021

SUBJECT:     Update on Interim Heritage Order for 10 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Hadchiti             Seconded: Clr Hadid

 

That Council:

 

1.   Receive and note the assessment of heritage significance prepared by FORM Architects for 10 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool;

 

2.   Not proceed with a planning proposal to list 10 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool as an item of local heritage significance in Schedule 5 of the Liverpool Local Environmental Plan 2008;

 

3.   Revoke the Interim Heritage Order issued on 10 Hoxton Park Road, Liverpool effective from the next available NSW Government Gazette; and

 

4.   Notify the landowner of Council’s decision.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ITEM NO:       CONF 06

FILE NO:        315935.2021

SUBJECT:     Maintenance of Council's On and Off Street Parking Machines

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That Council, in accordance with section 55 (3) (i) of the Local Government Act 1993, approves:

 

1.    Deferring the public contesting of the provision of maintenance of Off-Street and On-Street Parking Machines for a period of six (6) months, ending 31 May 2022; and

 

2.    Reino International Pty Ltd to continue delivering the current maintenance of Off-Street and On-Street Parking Machines until the new tender is awarded or 31 May 2022. 

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

ITEM NO:       CONF 07

FILE NO:        324904.2021

SUBJECT:     RCL3070 - Supply of Library Materials

 

COUNCIL DECISION

 

Motion:                                 Moved: Clr Rhodes              Seconded: Clr Shelton

 

That Council:

 

1.    Accept the tenders from the recommended tenderers for Tender RCL3070 - Supply of Library Materials for an initial three (3) years contract term with the option of extending 2 x 12 months at the Schedule of Rates GST inclusive as contained in the submissions;

 

2.    Makes public its decision regarding tender RCL3070 - Supply of Library Materials;

 

3.    Notes that the Chief Executive Officer will finalise all details and sign the Letter of Acceptance following publication of draft Minutes on Council website for the tender, giving it contractual effect, in accordance with delegated authority; and

 

4.    Keeps confidential the details supplied in this report containing information on the submissions received, pursuant to the provisions of Section 10A(2)(d)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993 as it contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.

 

On being put to the meeting the motion was declared CARRIED.

 

Councillors voted unanimously for this motion.

 

 

Council moved back into open session at 7:43pm and Mayor Waller read the resolutions relating to CONF 02, CONF 03, CONF 04, CONF 05, CONF 06 and CONF 07 that were passed in Closed Session and are found on previous pages.

 


 

 

 

THE MEETING CLOSED AT 7:49pm.

 

 

 

<Signature>

Name: Wendy Waller

Title:    Mayor

Date:    24 November 2021

I have authorised a stamp bearing my signature to be affixed to the pages of the Minutes of the Council Meeting held on  27 October 2021. I confirm that Council has adopted these Minutes as a true and accurate record of the meeting.

 


0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Planning & Compliance Report

 

PLAN 01

Place Naming Requests: Car Parks in Liverpool and Stairway in Casula

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Celebrate diversity, promote inclusion and recognise heritage

File Ref

343216.2021

Report By

Danielle Hijazi - Assistant Strategic Planner

Approved By

David Smith - Director Planning & Compliance

 

Executive Summary

 

This report seeks a Council resolution on three place naming requests listed below.

 

1.    Naming of a car park to “Gasworks Car Park” located on the Corner of Shepherd and Speed Street, Liverpool.

 

2.    Naming of a car park to “Telowra Car Park” located on the Corner of Speed and Pirie Street Liverpool.

 

3.    Naming of a pathway between Canberra Avenue and Casula Road, Casula to Sophienburg Stairway.

 

The proposed names have been assessed using Council’s Naming Convention Policy and have been granted pre-approval by the NSW Geographical Names Board (GNB).

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Supports the naming of Gasworks Car Park (Liverpool), Telowra Car Park (Liverpool) and Sophienburg Stairway (Casula).

 

2.    Forwards the names to the Geographical Names Board seeking formal approval;

 

3.    Publicly exhibit the names in accordance with Council’s Naming Convention Policy, for a period of 28 days, following formal approval from the GNB; and

 

4.    Authorises the Chief Executive Officer to undertake the process of gazettal if there are no submissions received during public exhibition.

 

REPORT

 

Gasworks Car Park (Corner of Shepherd and Speed Street, Liverpool).

 

A Place naming proposal was received in July 2021 to name a Council car park, located on the corner of Shepherd and Speed Street, Liverpool to “Gasworks Car Park” as shown in Figure 1 below.

 

The proposed place name has been assessed using Council’s Naming Convention Policy and the Geographical Names Board has granted pre-approval.

 

The location of the car park was formerly the site of the Liverpool Gasworks from approximately the 1890-1920s.

 

Naming the car park “Gasworks Car Park” will reconnect the site with its history.

 

Figure 1: Car park to be named Gasworks Car Park


 

Telowra Car Park (Corner of Speed and Pirie Street Liverpool).

 

A Place naming proposal was received in July 2021, to name a car park located on the corner of Speed and Pirie Street Liverpool to “Telowra Car Park” as shown in Figure 2 below.

 

The proposed place name has been assessed using Council’s Naming Convention Policy and the Geographical Names Board has granted pre-approval.

 

The location of the car park was formerly the site of the historic “Telowra House” and from the late 1800s and early 1900s was the home of George W.S. Rowe, the Secretary of the Rosehill Racing Club. Horse races were named after George, “The George Rowe Stakes” and the house, “The Telowra Handicap” amongst others.

 

Naming the car park “Telowra Car Park” will reconnect the site with its history.

 

It is noted that the land on which this car park is located is owned by Transport Asset Holding Entity of New South Wales (formally Railcorp). Council will engage with the landowner regarding the naming proposal.

 

Figure 2: Car park to be named Telowra Car Park


 

Sophienburg Stairway, Casula (Stairway is located between Canberra Avenue and Casula Road, Casula).

 

A Place naming proposal was received in July 2021, to name a public path and stairway located between Canberra Avenue and Casula Road, Casula to “Sophienburg Stairway” as shown in Figure 3 below.

 

The stairway links Canberra Avenue with Casula Railway Station.

 

The proposed place name has been assessed using Council’s Naming Convention Policy and the Geographical Names Board has granted pre-approval.

 

The location of the stairway was formerly the location of Sophienburg house and estate and dates back to the 1840s. The house was owned by several significant members of NSW Parliament including Thomas Holt, James Atkinson and Samuel Saul.

 

Naming the Stairway “Sophienburg Stairway” will reconnect the site with its history.

 

Figure 3: Location of stairway to be named Sophienburg Stairway

 

Next Steps

 

If supported by Council, the above naming requests will be placed on public exhibition for 28 days on Council’s website. If no objections are received, the naming requests will be forwarded to the Geographical Names Board for formal approval and gazettal. Council officers will consider all submissions during the public notification period. The following three potential scenarios are likely to arise:

 

·     No objections received - The naming requests will be forwarded to the Geographical Names Board for formal approval and gazettal to the NSW Parliamentary Counsel’s Office (PCO) under the delegation of the Chief Executive Officer (or delegate). Relevant stakeholders will be notified to update their mapping systems, including Australia Post, NSW Ambulance, Fire and Rescue NSW, NSW Rural Fire Service, NSW State Emergency Service, NSW Volunteer Rescue Association, Transport for NSW and NSW Police Force.

 

·     Objections from the relevant agencies - Council will not proceed with the naming requests. A report to Council will be prepared for the next available meeting outlining the reason for rejection.

 

·     Submissions received from the community - If there is a strong community objection, or reason to reconsider the proposed name, a report will be prepared for the next available Council meeting.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Preserve and maintain heritage, both landscape and cultural as urban development takes place.


Civic Leadership

Foster neighbourhood pride and a sense of responsibility.

Legislative

Roads Act 1993.

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Naming Request Form - Telowra Car Park - Liverpool

2.         Naming Request Form - Gas Works Car Park - Liverpool

3.         Naming Request Form - Sophienburg Stairway - Casula


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PLAN 01

Place Naming Requests: Car Parks in Liverpool and Stairway in Casula

Attachment 1

Naming Request Form - Telowra Car Park - Liverpool

 

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0

PLAN 01

Place Naming Requests: Car Parks in Liverpool and Stairway in Casula

Attachment 2

Naming Request Form - Gas Works Car Park - Liverpool

 

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0

PLAN 01

Place Naming Requests: Car Parks in Liverpool and Stairway in Casula

Attachment 3

Naming Request Form - Sophienburg Stairway - Casula

 

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0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Planning & Compliance Report

 

PLAN 02

Submission on Explanation of Intended Effect - Large Scale Cemeteries as State Significant Development

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

351712.2021

Report By

Kweku Aikins - Senior Strategic Planner

Approved By

David Smith - Director Planning & Compliance

 

Executive Summary

 

In October 2021, the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) released an Explanation of Intended Effect (Attachment 1) that proposes changes to State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011 (SRD SEPP) to provide for large scale cemeteries to be assessed as State Significant Development (SSD).

 

This change would apply to cemetery development proposals with at least 20,000 burial plots.

 

The proposed changes are consistent with the recommendations outlined in the NSW Government commissioned statutory review of the Cemeteries and Crematoria Act 2013 entitled “The 11th Hour – Solving Sydney’s Cemetery Crisis” dated August 2020.

 

A draft submission has been prepared and is tabled for Council’s consideration.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Endorses the submission on the Explanation of Intended Effect to provide for large scale cemeteries to be assessed as State Significant Development; and

 

2.    Forwards a copy of the submission to the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment

 

 

 

 

REPORT

 

To address the forecast shortage of burial space in Greater Sydney, the NSW Government commissioned a statutory review of the Cemeteries and Crematoria Act 2013 entitled 'The 11th Hour - Solving Sydney's Cemetery Crisis'.

 

The report provided a range of options to address challenges across the sector, including a recommendation that cemeteries be considered State significant development in line with other key social infrastructure like schools and hospitals to assist in the timely delivery of new cemetery development.

 

Consistent with this recommendation, the NSW Government is proposing to amend Schedule 1 of the SRD SEPP to enable new or expanded cemeteries with a minimum of 20,000 burial plots to be assessed as State significant development (including expansions to existing cemeteries and any associated/ancillary uses and structures such as crematoria, function centres and other internal infrastructure).

 

Typically, the scale of development identified under Schedule 1 of the SRD SEPP is triggered by its capital investment value (CIV) to capture only larger-scale developments. However, the NSW Government believes that CIV is not considered to be an accurate measure of the scale and significance of cemeteries.

 

Based on current burial trends, 20,000 burial plots would contribute to approximately two years of supply in Greater Sydney. Smaller proposals would continue to be assessed by Council, either as local development or regionally significant development depending on the CIV of the development.

 

On a related matter, Council resolved at its meeting on 24 February 2021 to “direct the CEO to bring to the April 2021 Council meeting a planning proposal similar to that of Penrith City Council seeking to amend our LEP prohibiting cemeteries and crematoriums within Wallacia”. A planning proposal was drafted consistent with this resolution and was considered by Council at the 26 May 2021 Council meeting. Council unanimously resolved to support the planning proposal and to forward it to DPIE for a Gateway determination. DPIE formally rejected Council’s request for a Gateway determination on 12 July 2021.  

 

Recommendations

 

A draft submission on the EIE is included in Attachment 2. The recommendations are:

 

·     If the Government intends on having large scale cemeteries assessed as State significant development, it is recommended that the proposed threshold be revised from the number of burial plots to the CIV of the development, so that any proposed cemetery with a CIV of $30 million or greater be classified as State significant development. This approach is consistent with other land uses listed in Schedule 1 of State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011.

 

·     Should the amendments proceed as proposed, it is recommended that a review process is undertaken to ensure that future developments result in improved outcomes under the State significant development pathway.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

Manage air, water, noise and chemical pollution.

Retain viable opportunities for local food production while managing land use to meet urban growth.

Protect, enhance and maintain areas of endangered ecological communities and high quality bushland as part of an attractive mix of land uses.


Social

Preserve and maintain heritage, both landscape and cultural as urban development takes place.


Civic Leadership

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

State Environmental Planning Policy (State and Regional Development) 2011

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Explanation of Intended Effects (Under separate cover)

2.         Council Draft Submission on EIE


0

PLAN 02

Submission on Explanation of Intended Effect - Large Scale Cemeteries as State Significant Development

Attachment 2

Council Draft Submission on EIE

 

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0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Planning & Compliance Report

 

PLAN 03

Submission on Aerotropolis Planning Package

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Exercise planning controls to create high-quality, inclusive urban environments

File Ref

360358.2021

Report By

Luke Oste - Coordinator Strategic Planning

Approved By

David Smith - Director Planning & Compliance

 

Executive Summary

 

On 8 October 2021, the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) released the following documents for public exhibition:

·        Western Sydney Aerotropolis Explanation of Intended Effect (EIE);

·        Aerotropolis Open Space Needs Study;

·        Luddenham Village Discussion Paper; and

·        Western Sydney Aerotropolis Development Control Plan - Phase 2.

 

The exhibition period closed on 5 November 2021. Council wrote to DPIE advising that Council’s endorsed submission would be forwarded to DPIE following consideration by Council at the 24 November 2021 Council meeting. DPIE requested a draft Council submission be forwarded to DPIE in the interim.

 

Council is currently undertaking a comprehensive review and analysis of the Phase 2 Development Control Plan (DCP) and welcomes DPIEs commitment to not finalise the DCP this year and to continue to work collaboratively with Council and industry to further refine the DCP.

 

It is recommended that Council endorses the submission on the Aerotropolis planning package and notes that detailed technical comments in relation to the draft Phase 2 DCP will be provided to DPIE separately.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Endorses the submission on the Aerotropolis planning package and forwards a copy to the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment; and

 

2.    Notes that detailed technical comments in relation to the draft Phase 2 DCP will be provided to DPIE separately.

 

REPORT

 

On 8 October 2021, DPIE released the following documents for public exhibition:

·       Western Sydney Aerotropolis Explanation of Intended Effect

·       Aerotropolis Open Space Needs Study

·       Luddenham Village Discussion Paper; and

·       Western Sydney Aerotropolis Development Control Plan - Phase 2

 

The exhibition period closed on 5 November 2021.Council’s draft submission in included in Attachment 2.

 

Western Sydney Aerotropolis Explanation of Intended Effect (EIE)

 

In response to the report of the Independent Community Commissioner, Professor Roberta Ryan, DPIE are proposed changes to the State Environmental Planning Policy (Western Sydney Aerotropolis) 2020 (Aerotropolis SEPP). These changes have been set out in the exhibited Western Sydney Aerotropolis Explanation of Intended Effect (EIE) and supported by the Aerotropolis Open Space Needs Study.

 

In summary, Council’s submission contains the following key points:

·       Supports the proposed changes to the Environment and Recreation zone (ENZ);

·       Supports in principle a regional stormwater authority to plan and manage stormwater infrastructure in the Aerotropolis;

·       Broadly supports the reduction in the open space network;

·       Supports land identified for publicly accessible open space being identified on the Land Reservation Acquisition map and that consideration be given to zoning this land accordingly;

·       Requested clarification on potential lot fragmentation and isolation resulting from the open space network and stormwater infrastructure;

·       Supports land identified for stormwater infrastructure being zoned SP2 Stormwater Infrastructure and being identified on the Land Reservation Acquisition map;

·       Supports the enabling of previously permissible uses under the Liverpool LEP, subject to the nominated considerations in the Aerotropolis SEPP;

·       Supports the “savings provisions” in relation to subdivision development applications lodged with Council prior to the commencement of the Aerotropolis SEPP;

·       Supports the inclusion of “Building Restricted Areas” at the ends of the airport runways;

·       Requests additional guidance be provided in relation to the application of the Western Sydney Aerotropolis Recognise Country Guideline to inform future development assessment;

·       Requests clarification in relation to key future transport corridors;

·       Requests clarification and mapping be provided to clarify the application of the Complying Development approval pathway;

·       Not supporting the proposal for the Western Parkland City Authority (WPCA) having a ‘concurrence’ or ‘approval’ role in considering a precinct plan prior to approval by the Minister for Planning and Public Spaces, given the Authority is not a planning authority; and

·       Requesting further guidance be provided around the making and amending of a Master Plan.

 

Luddenham Village Discussion Paper

 

Council supports the work undertaken by the Western Sydney Planning Partnership on commissioning the Luddenham Village Plan and supporting technical studies to ensure a sustainable future for Luddenham Village.

 

In summary, Council’s submission contains the following key points, and has been informed following a meeting with the Luddenham Progress Association:

·     Reiterates Council’s concerns with the current zoning of Luddenham as Agribusiness, particularly the potential residential amenity impacts if agribusiness uses establish in existing residential areas;

·     Considers that the Agribusiness zone is not appropriate for Luddenham and that more appropriate business and residential zones are reinstated;

·     Requests the timing of amendments to the Aerotropolis SEPP in relation to Luddenham should coincide with the finalisation of the Luddenham Village Plan, Precinct Plan and Stage 2 DCP;

·     Generally supports Option 4 as the most appropriate option to ensure the future sustainability and viability of Luddenham, provided airport safeguarding is properly considered;

·     Requests clarification on how the proposed 1,200 new dwellings will be appropriately serviced by reticulated sewerage and timing for the delivery of that infrastructure by Sydney Water.

 

Council’s submission strongly supports ongoing engagement with the Luddenham community as the Planning Partnership and DPIE refine the plans.

 

 

 

Western Sydney Aerotropolis Development Control Plan – Phase 2

 

The Phase 2 DCP supersedes the Phase 1 DCP that was adopted by DPIE. The role of the Phase 2 DCP is to provide controls to supplement the Western Sydney Aerotropolis Plan (WSAP), the Aerotropolis SEPP, the Western Sydney Aerotropolis Precinct Plan (Aerotropolis Precinct Plan) and inform the preparation and assessment of master plans and development applications.

 

Council is currently undertaking a comprehensive review and analysis of the Phase 2 Development Control Plan (DCP) and welcomes DPIEs commitment to not finalise the DCP this year and to continue to work collaboratively with Council and industry to further refine the DCP.

 

Conclusion

 

It is recommended that Council endorses the submission on the Aerotropolis planning package and notes that detailed technical comments in relation to the draft Phase 2 DCP will be provided to DPIE separately.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Enhance the environmental performance of buildings and homes.

Deliver a high quality local road system including provision and maintenance of infrastructure and management of traffic issues.

Facilitate economic development.

Environment

Manage the environmental health of waterways.

Manage air, water, noise and chemical pollution.

Enhance the environmental performance of buildings and homes.

Protect, enhance and maintain areas of endangered ecological communities and high quality bushland as part of an attractive mix of land uses.

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.

Promote an integrated and user friendly public transport service.

Support the delivery of a range of transport options.


Social

Preserve and maintain heritage, both landscape and cultural as urban development takes place.

Regulate for a mix of housing types that responds to different population groups such as young families and older people.


Civic Leadership

Undertake communication practices with the community and stakeholders across a range of media.

Actively advocate for federal and state government support, funding and services.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

State Environmental Planning Policy (Western Sydney Aerotropolis) 2020

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Letter from DPIE

2.         Council Submission


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PLAN 03

Submission on Aerotropolis Planning Package

Attachment 1

Letter from DPIE

 

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PLAN 03

Submission on Aerotropolis Planning Package

Attachment 2

Council Submission

 

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0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Planning & Compliance Report

 

PLAN 04

Report back - QWN 03 from 27 October 2021 Council meeting COVID-19 and Council Orders

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

365429.2021

Report By

Nada Mardini - Manager Community Standards

Approved By

David Smith - Director Planning & Compliance

 

Executive Summary

 

Council resolved on 27 October 2021 “that a report be brought to Council on possible COVID Policy and procedure for Council orders, fines and/or other legal matters that addresses situations where Public Health Orders and/or State or Federal restrictions make it impossible for constituents to carry out the orders, or within timeframes addressed in the Council orders as a result of a pandemic placed restrictions.”

 

The above Council resolution relates to operational compliance and enforcement matters subject to Council’s Enforcement Standard 2021.

 

Council applied discretion during the recent COVID lockdown and ceased issuing notices/orders including the issuing of warning letters on outstanding orders as well as fines. Council recommenced inspections and compliance action only after the easing of the NSW Public Health Orders.

 

Should the NSW Government reintroduce Public Health Orders and/or restrictions which impact on the ability of landowners to comply with Council Orders in the future, Council will operationally apply the same discretion that was applied during the recent lockdown, as outlined in Council’s Enforcement Standard.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receive and note this report.

 

REPORT

 

Council resolved at its meeting on 27 October 2021:

 

“that a report be brought to Council on possible COVID Policy and procedure for Council orders, fines and/or other legal matters that addresses situations where Public Health Orders and/or State or Federal restrictions make it impossible for constituents to carry out the orders, or within timeframes addressed in the Council orders as a result of a pandemic placed restrictions.”

 

The above Council resolution relates to operational compliance and enforcement matters subject to Council’s Enforcement Standard 2021 (Attachment 1).

 

One of the objectives of the Enforcement Standard requires Council’s authorised officers to:

 

“Apply standards of reasonableness, common sense and good judgement while remaining firm and maintaining their ability to put in place effective resolution solutions when disputes occur.”

 

Council applied this principle following the most recent COVID lockdown during which Council ceased issuing notices/orders including the issuing of warning letters on outstanding orders as well as fines. Council recommenced inspections and compliance action only after the easing of the NSW Public Health Orders.

 

Should the NSW Government reintroduce Public Health Orders and/or restrictions which impact on the ability of landowners to comply with Council Orders in the future, Council will operationally apply the same discretion that was applied during the recent lockdown, as outlined in Council’s Enforcement Standard.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act

Local Government Act

Protection of the Environment Operations Act

Road Rules 2014

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Enforcement Standard


0

PLAN 04

Report back - QWN 03 from 27 October 2021 Council meeting COVID-19 and Council Orders

Attachment 1

Enforcement Standard

 

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0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Community & Culture Report

 

COM 01

Grants, Donations & Community Sponsorship Report

 

Strategic Direction

Creating Connection

Implement access and equity for all members of the community

File Ref

331127.2021

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Tina Bono - Director Community & Culture

 

Executive Summary

 

Council is committed to building strong and resilient communities in the Liverpool Local Government Area (LGA) and to maximising social wellbeing. Council helps achieve these goals by providing financial support through grants and sponsorships to develop leadership skills, increase participation in community activities and address identified social issues.

 

Impacts from COVID-19, including the respective physical distancing requirements have impacted on capacity and eligibility of programs, projects, or events. This is expected to change as restrictions are easing and vaccination rates are increasing. To ascertain community safety, demonstrate compliance with NSW Health guidelines, and demonstrate evidence of proactive and measurable program governance, applicants have been requested to provide information on their compliance with COVID-19 safety guidelines.

 

This report provides a recommendation for funding totalling $5,000 from the Community Grants programs to support the development and delivery of language accessibility materials for a community survey on heat and health.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council endorses the recommendation of $5,000 (GST exclusive) under the Community Grants Program for the following projects:

 

Applicant

Project

Recommended

Sweltering Cities

Language accessibility for community survey on heat and health

$5,000

 

 

REPORT

 

Community Grants Program

 

The Community Grants Program received one application which met the eligibility criteria and is recommended for funding as follows:

 

Applicant 

Sweltering Cities

Project 

Language accessibility for community survey on heat and health

Amount Requested

$5,000

Total Project Cost

$5,000

Location

The survey will be delivered online and face-to-face across Sydney, with a particular focus of increasing participant representation in the Liverpool LGA.

Date

01/12/2021

About the Applicant

Sweltering Cities works with community members who live, work or study in heat-affected communities to collect and tell their stories. These stories are shared with local representatives and relevant decision-makers to achieve cooler, more livable and equitable communities.

 

Sweltering Cities deliver community building, information gathering and networking opportunities. They provide training to residents, organisations and businesses to have their voices heard on matters which affect the communities in which they work, live or study.

 

Sweltering Cities amplify the voices of scientists and academics working on the issue of heat and its impact on public health and promote the lived experience of heat in Western and South Western Sydney communities to media, planners and policy makers.

 

Description 

Objectives:

This program will support the translation of a community survey into three community languages – Arabic, Vietnamese and Hindi. It will also support the provision of promotional materials and an evaluation report which will include outcomes specific to the Liverpool LGA.

 

The project delivery will include in-person and online survey delivery and outreach, social media promotion, training of outreach volunteers and working with local community organisations and networks to promote the survey.


Outcomes:

·    Enable Sweltering Cities to increase representation of Liverpool resident’s participation in the survey by an additional 100 participants from the previous survey conducted;

·    Allow for the culturally diverse communities of the Liverpool LGA to be adequately represented through the provision of translated materials in three community languages;

·    Provide a platform for community members to have their voices heard regarding local heat issues and how this impacts health. The survey will also capture community members experiences of how COVID-19 has impacted on their ability to keep cool at home in summer, and how renters are supported or restricted in upgrading their cooling systems to manage extreme heat conditions; and

·    Provide a report of the community survey results including a report outlining outcomes specific to the Liverpool LGA for distribution to Liverpool City Council, local representatives and partner organisations. The report will also be distributed to the community online.

COVID-19 Safety Plan

The applicant has considered the health and safety risks associated with COVID-19 and has a COVID-19 safety plan registered with NSW Health.

Beneficiaries 

·    Community members of the Liverpool LGA who will be provided the platform to have their voices heard on heat and health issues that impact their communities;

·    Liverpool’s culturally diverse communities for whom the survey will be more accessible, leading to better representation in report outcomes; and

·    Liverpool City Council, local representatives, partner organisations, community planners and media who will have access to or promote the outcomes of this report in order to inform future planning strategies and initiatives.

Assessment 

Recommended for Funding - $5,000

 

The project aligns with the Community Strategic Plan Direction 1 Creating Connection and meets the Community Grants Program’s funding priorities.

 

Expected program outcomes 7.4.1 a), b), f); and g).

 

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

COMMUNITY SPONSORSHIP

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$100,000

$71,050

Nil

$71,050

COMMUNITY GRANTS

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$102,000

$97,000

$5,000

$92,000

MATCHING GRANTS

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$200,000

$200,000

Nil

$200,000

SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT GRANTS*

Budget

Balance

Recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$75,000

$75,000

Nil

$75,000

COMBINED FUNDING BALANCE

Combined Budget

Combined Balance

Total recommended funding in this report

Remaining

$477,000

$443,050

$5,000

$438,050

 

* Sustainable Environment Grants funding is via a rate levy and is only eligible to be used for the Sustainable Environment Grants Program.

Environment

Support schools and community groups to play an active role in reducing their impact on the environment and implementing environmentally sustainable actions.


Social

Support community organisations and groups to deliver services.


Civic Leadership

Role model to applicants, residents, and general public on COVID-19 safe practices and procedures when supporting funding requests.

Legislative

 Local Government Act 1993 - s356.

Risk

Risk of supporting these activities is considered low. Applicants have provided information on their compliance with COVID-19 safety guidelines published by NSW Health.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Grants, Donations and Community Sponsorship Policy (Under separate cover)  


0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Community & Culture Report

 

COM 02

Report back to Council: Harris Creek Reserve Fairy Glen

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Increase community engagement

File Ref

354717.2021

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Tina Bono - Director Community & Culture

 

Executive Summary

 

At its meeting on 27 October 2021, Council resolved:

 

That Council:

 

1.    Formally support in principle the development of a Fairy Glen at Harris Creek Reserve where there are no environmental conflicts;

 

2.    Continue to engage with the community to further explore the proposal, discuss opportunities and constraints, the residents capacity to manage the activity and Council’s role and potential levels of support. Provide a report back to the November Council meeting in regard to the further investigation and assessment of Council; and

 

3.    To communicate details of this initiative across Liverpool Council’s social media and website.

 

Council officers have met with the community representatives of the Fairy Glen initiative and those who have raised concerns about the environmental impacts. While supported by Council, it is vital that the project comply with environmental considerations and remain a community-led initiative to encourage community ownership and connection to the project and foster a sense of pride in the Fairy Glen and surrounding open space. This initiative provides opportunities for social and recreational activities and strengthening the community connections and wellbeing.

 

In consultation with residents, alternative sites for a permanent Fairy Glen that will minimise environmental impacts are currently being investigated. Council will provide guidance and support to the residents on appropriate materials and methods of installation, sustainable practices and educational opportunities to ensure the Fairy Glen is environmentally sound and sustainable into the future.

 

It is anticipated that Council’s support for the project will be mostly provided through existing resources and in-kind support. However, any financial implications will be further investigated as part of project management scope.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

REPORT

 

Background

 

The Holsworthy Fairy Glen at Harris Creek Reserve is an initiative of local residents in Holsworthy/Wattle Grove and surrounding areas. Commenced during the recent COVID-19 lockdown, this initiative involved the installation of small “fairy doors” and other decorations on trees along the walking track at Harris Creek Reserve. The initiative grew exponentially since its inception, due in part to the desire of local community members to access parks and open spaces for exercise and recreation during lockdown and restrictions on travel distances. The Holsworthy Fairy Glen became a popular attraction for local families to visit and enjoy.

 

Despite its popularity, some residents have expressed concerns regarding the environmental impacts of the Fairy Glen, including the installation of fairy doors and other decorations to trees and leaving of trinkets along the walking path. This concern manifested in community action, with the removal of the Fairy Glen doors and decorations. This created tension in the community, with coverage by several media outlets.

 

This tension led to the creation of a petition presented at Council’s September meeting requesting Council endorsement of the Holsworthy Fairy Glen. A subsequent Notice of Motion was presented to the October meeting, receiving unanimous, in principle endorsement from Council. The resolution directs staff to work with the community to develop the Fairy Glen in an environmentally sustainable and safe manner.

 

Consultation and considerations update

 

An internal working group including representatives of various Council departments has been formed to work with the community on this project. Departments represented include Community Development and Planning, City Environmental, City Works, Environmental Operations, Library Services, Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre (CPAC) Public Programs and City Design and Public Domain.

 

The working group has identified a number of factors and considerations for investigation in the ongoing development of this project, including:

·     The use of appropriate materials for doors and other decorative items;

·     The risk of harm to trees and other vegetation;

·     The vegetation of Harris Creek Reserve is listed as a threatened ecological community;

·     The area is a flood zone which should therefore be considered in terms of materials potentially contaminating the waterway, particularly during periods of high flows;

·     The safety of participants in this activity – natural hazards such as wildlife, vegetation and other natural hazards; and

·     The safety of participants in this activity - this area has been identified in past instances of criminal activity, including assault.

 

Following this initial working group discussion, relevant Council officers met with the resident committee to discuss this project in more detail including Council’s potential involvement, opportunities for education and recreation within the space, public concerns such as safety and environmental impacts, and expectations of ongoing management of the Fairy Glen by the community. A formalised process including development of a project management framework and guidelines have been discussed and will be investigated in consultation with residents. The community’s initial response to this approach has been highly positive. The community representatives have since submitted a comprehensive proposal to Council, which addressed many of the concerns raised during working group discussions.

 

It is anticipated that Council’s support for the project will be mostly provided through existing resources and in-kind support. However, any financial implications will be further investigated as part of project management scope.

 

 

Site analysis and location update

 

In light of the identified environmental impacts and safety concerns at the original site, an alternative location within Harris Creek Reserve has been proposed to co-locate the Fairy Glen with existing social infrastructure.

 

The proposed location provides greater connection to existing amenities such as barbeque areas and shade structures, the children’s play equipment and waste disposal facilities. This location also supports improved safety for participants by increasing passive surveillance and reducing the risk of slips, trips and falls that exist on the lower path which can become slippery and covered in debris. Further, the new location provides a dedicated space for the Fairy Glen, which is easier to establish and allows for improved management outcomes by Council and the community.

 

With the proximity to existing open space, the proposal minimises the potential environmental impacts and decreases the risk of damage to the natural environment by limiting the activity to the highly modified bushland interface. The community representatives have agreed that the proposed location is better suited and more conducive to ongoing community engagement with the project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


          Proposed location: the upper walking track within Harris Creek Reserve

 

Intentions and opportunities

 

In addition to formal endorsement and establishment of the Fairy Glen, Council will provide guidance and support to the residents on appropriate materials and methods of installation, sustainable practices and educational opportunities to ensure the Fairy Glen remains environmentally sound and sustainable into the future.

 

While Council will provide support and guidance, it is vital that the project remain a community-led initiative to encourage ongoing community ownership and connection to the project, and to foster a sense of pride in the Fairy Glen.

 

Moving forward, the residents and Council working group have identified a number of opportunities which support the development of this initiative. These include:

·     The installation of signage to mark the location and scope of the Fairy Glen trial, outlining a narrative of the fairies and their homes to encourage imaginative participation and engagement for local children and their families, while reinforcing environmental guidelines;

·     The inclusion of QR codes on signage which directs community members to a factsheet identifying suitable materials and sustainable practices for engaging with the Fairy Glen;

·     The development of a written agreement between Council and the resident committee which outlines the key roles, responsibilities and expectations of all parties; including accountability and decision making;

·     Hosting a launch of the Fairy Glen including an installation day where Council will facilitate a workshop on the installation of new doors and educate community members of appropriate methods of installation;

·     Potential reactivation of the local Environmental Volunteer group to support ongoing weed control and protection of the natural environment; and

·     School holiday workshops and activities to keep the community engaged with the Fairy Glen, which engage local children to design and decorate fairy doors and decorations while providing education around environmental sustainability.

 

The internal working group will continue to work with community representatives to investigate these opportunities as part of the formal support for the Fairy Glen.

 

Further, Council will liaise with residents who have expressed concerns regarding the environmental impacts of this project to provide updates on measures being undertaken to ensure the location, materials and methods are in accordance with environmental practices and expectations.

 

.

 

Timeline

An estimated project timeline for the Council-supported Fairy Glen is as follows:

 

October 2021

Council endorsement of project and establishment of internal working group

First meeting with the resident committee

November 2021

Confirmation of location and site inspection

Promotion of Council endorsement through social and other media channels

December 2021

On-site meeting with resident committee and working group members

Preparation of site including weed control measures, installation of stumps and general maintenance

Development of a project management framework and guidelines, including fact sheet and information resources

Development of signage and narrative

mid-January 2022

School holiday activity workshops offered to design and decorate fairy doors and other decorations

late-January 2022

Official launch of the Holsworthy Fairy Glen and installation day

 

Conclusion

 

The Holsworthy Fairy Glen presents a unique opportunity for Council and residents to work together to enhance public spaces and to encourage community engagement with local initiatives and projects. This approach fosters a sense of community pride for residents in their local area and builds ongoing positive relationships between Council and residents. Further, this initiative will support the establishment and strengthening of relationships amongst community members, which can help to address social isolation and promote community harmony.

 

It is vital that this project, while being supported and guided by Council, remains one which is led and managed by the community for the community.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

Manage the environmental health of waterways.

Protect, enhance and maintain areas of endangered ecological communities and high-quality bushland as part of an attractive mix of land uses.

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.


Social

Provide cultural centres and activities for the enjoyment of the arts.

Balance recreational needs and community expectation with conservation outcomes.

Support community organisations, groups and volunteers to deliver coordinated services to the community.

Promote community harmony and address discrimination.


Civic Leadership

Act as an environmental leader in the community.

Foster neighbourhood pride and a sense of responsibility.

Facilitate the development of community leaders.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Corporate Services Report

 

CORP 01

Investment Report October 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Seek efficient and innovative methods to manage our resources

File Ref

322223.2021

Report By

Chi Nguyen - Accountant - Investments & Treasury Management

Approved By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer

 

Executive Summary

 

This report details Council’s investment portfolio and its performance for the month ended 31st October 2021:

·    Council held investments with a market value of $359 million.

·    RBA has maintained the cash rate at 0.10% with an indication to keep it at this level for next three years. This is having a significant impact on Council’s interest earnings;

·    The portfolio yield was 110 basis points above the AusBond Bank Bill index;

 

AusBond Bank Bill Index (ABBI)

Benchmark

0.03%

Portfolio yield

1.04%

Performance above benchmarks

1.01%

 

·    Return on investment was $504k lower than the original budget. This excludes $721k decline in fair value of FRN’s due to unfavourable market movements.

·    Council’s investment advisor, Amicus Advisory, has completed its review of Emerald Mortgage Backed Securities and recommends Council continue to hold its investments in the “Class A” and both “Class C” securities given current poor market pricing. MBS Securities are now not rated;

·    Council’s investments and reporting obligations fully complied with the requirements of section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993 and clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005;

·    Council’s portfolio also fully complied with limits set out in its current Investment Policy; and

·    Council is committed to NSW TCorp’s balanced investment framework and held 18.41% of its portfolio in ADI’s rated BBB and below.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes this report.

 

REPORT

 

Clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires that the Responsible Accounting Officer must provide Council with a written report setting out details of all money that Council has invested under section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Council’s Portfolio

 

At 31st October 2021, Council held investments with a market value of $359 million. Council’s investment register detailing all its investments is provided as an attachment to this report. In summary, Council’s portfolio consisted of investments in:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ratio of market value compared to face value of various debt securities is shown in the table below.

 

Asset Class

Oct-21

Jun-21

Senior Debts (FRN's ,TCD's & FRB)*

100.89%

101.27%

MBS (Reverse Mortgage Backed Securities)

78.85%

71.06%

T-Corp Unit Trusts

103.09%

103.17%

 

*Definition of terms

 

·      Transferrable Certificate of Deposit (TCD) - security issued with the same characteristics as a Term Deposit however it can be sold back (transferred) into the market prior to maturity. A floating TCD pays a coupon linked to a variable benchmark (90 days BBSW).

·      Fixed Rate Bond (FRB) – returns Fixed Coupon (interest) Rate and is tradeable before maturity.

 

·    Floating Rate Note (FRN) - returns an aggregate of a fixed margin and a variable benchmark (usually BBSW).

 

The economic environment globally, including Australia, suffered significantly from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in March. The market value of Council’s investment in FRN’s has since improved. Council has sufficient funds in its current account and has no plans at this stage to sell off any of its FRN’s to meet its short-term cashflow requirements.

 

Council is fully compliant with the requirements of the Ministerial Investment Order including the grandfathering provisions. The grandfathering provisions state that Council may continue to hold to maturity, redeem or sell investments that comply with previous Ministerial Investment Orders. Any new investments must comply with the most recent Order. Council continues to closely monitor the investments in its portfolio to ensure continued compliance and minimal exposure to risk.

 

Council is committed to NSW TCorp’s balanced investment framework and held 18.41% of its portfolio in ADI’s rated BBB and below.

 

Emerald – Mortgaged Backed Securities

 

Council’s new investment advisor, Amicus Advisory, was asked on appointment to review Council’s investments in “grandfathered” mortgage backed securities. Amicus has completed its review and recommends Council continue to hold its investments in the “Class A” and both “Class C” securities given current poor market pricing. Notwithstanding this recommendation, Amicus has assessed that both “Class C” securities are likely to eventually default. However, Council will continue to receive interest up until default which is likely to be many years away. Fitch Rating Agency has decided to withdraw its rating on mortgage backed securities and as a result, Council investments in these securities are now classed non-rated.

 

 

 

 

Portfolio Maturity Profile

 

The table below shows the percentage of funds invested at different durations to maturity.

 

 

Market Value by Issuer and Institution Policy limit as per Investment Policy

 

 

 

Overall Portfolio Credit Framework compliance to Investment Policy

 

 

 

 

Portfolio performance against relevant market benchmark.

 

Council’s Investment Policy prescribes the AusBond Bank Bill Index (ABBI) as a benchmark to measure return on cash and fixed interest securities. The ABBI represents the average daily yield of a parcel of bank bills. Historically there has been a positive correlation between changes in the cash rate and the resulting impact on the ABBI benchmark.

 

The portfolio yield to 31st October 2021 exceeded the AusBond Bank Bill index by 101 basis points (1.04% against 0.03%)

 

Council portfolio continues to perform at above benchmark rates despite ongoing margin contraction and significantly lower market term deposit yields. Comparative yields for the previous months are charted below:

 

 

Performance of Portfolio Returns against Budget

 

Council’s investment yield for October 2021 was $504k lower than the original budget. This excludes $721k decline in fair value of FRN’s due to unfavorable market movements.

 

 

Investment Portfolio at a Glance

 

 

Portfolio Performance

MCWB01114_0000[1]

The portfolio yield to 31st October 2021 exceeded the AusBond Bank Bill index by 101 basis points (1.04% against 0.03%).

Annual Income vs. Budget

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Council’s investment yield was $504k lower than the original budget as at 31st October 2021.

 

Investment Policy Compliance

 

Legislative Requirements

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Portfolio Credit Rating Limit

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Institutional Exposure Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Overall Portfolio Credit Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

Term to Maturity Limits

MCWB01114_0000[1]

Fully Compliant

§      

§     Economic Outlook – Reserve Bank of Australia

§      

The Reserve Bank has left the official cash rate on hold at 0.10 per cent in its meeting on 2nd November 2021.The current 0.10 per cent cash rate is at a historically low level and impacts returns on investment.

 

Certificate of Responsible Accounting Officer

 

The Chief Financial Officer, as Responsible Accounting Officer, certifies that the investments listed in the attached report have been made in accordance with section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 and Council’s Investment Policy at the time of their placement. The previous investments are covered by the grandfathering clauses of the current investment guidelines issued by the Minister for Local Government.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Council’s investment yield was $504k lower than the original budget as at 31st October 2021.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Council is fully compliant with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1993 – Investment Order (authorized investments) and with reporting requirements under clause 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

Risk

The capital value and return on investment is subject to market risks. Investment limits prescribed in Council’s policy framework is aimed to mitigate these risks.

Market interest is expected to stay at its lowest rate for a long period and will continue to put pressure on Council’s budget.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Investment Porfolio October 2021

 

 

  


0

CORP 01

Investment Report October 2021

Attachment 1

Investment Porfolio October 2021

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Corporate Services Report

 

CORP 02

Annual Financial Reports 2020-21

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

325358.2021

Report By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director Corporate Services

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has a regulatory obligation to prepare and present audited financial reports to the Office of Local Government (due on or before 31 October 2021) and to the Community.

 

The audit process took longer than expected and on recommendation of the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee, an extension was sought from NSW Office of Local Government to submit audited financial statements by 30 November 2021.

 

Council’s general-purpose financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021 have been prepared and audited by NSW Audit Office.

 

This paper seeks Council’s endorsement and a resolution authorising issue of the financial statements.

 

NSW Audit Office staff will be present at the Council Meeting to answer any questions.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and endorses the 2020-21audited financial reports;

 

2.    Authorises the Mayor, Deputy Mayor, Chief Executive Officer and the Responsible Accounting Officer (Chief Financial Officer) to sign the prescribed statement that will form part of the financial reports;

 

3.    Authorises the Chief Executive Officer to:

a)    forward a copy of the financial reports together with the auditor’s report to the Office of Local Government in accordance with Section 417(5) of the Local Government Act 1993;

b)    issue a public notice containing a summary of financial results and put the financial statements on exhibition for 7 days to seek public submissions;

c)    Note that the financial statements and a summary of public submissions received will be presented to Council at its next meeting for consideration and adoption.

 

REPORT

 

Legislative Requirements

 

The Local Government Act 1993 states:

 

As soon as practicable after a council receives a copy of the auditor’s reports:

·     It must fix a date for the meeting at which it proposes to present its audited financial reports, together with the auditor’s reports, to the public, and

·     It must give public notice of the date so fixed [Section 418 (1)]

·     The date fixed for the meeting must be at least 7 days after the date on which the notice is given, but not more than 5 weeks after the auditor’s reports are given to the council. [Section 418 (2)]

 

Council’s general-purpose financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021 have been prepared and reviewed by the Audit Risk and Improvement Committee at its meeting on Wednesday 15 October 2020.

 

Council’s auditors, NSW Audit Office, have audited the financial statements and will issue an unqualified audit certificate after receiving a signed “Statement by Councilors and Management” following this Council meeting.

 

This paper seeks Council’s endorsement and a resolution authorising issue of the financial statements. A complete set of draft general/ special purpose financial statements and special schedules are provided as Attachment 1.

 

NSW Audit Office staff will be present at the Council Meeting to answer any questions.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

Division 2 of the Local Government Act 1993

Risk

Financial risk management issues are included in the financial statements

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Draft Audited Financial Statements 2020-21 (Under separate cover)  


0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Corporate Services Report

 

CORP 03

2017-2022 Community Strategic Plan End of Term Report

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

352631.2021

Report By

Hiba Soueid - Manager Corporate Strategy and Performance

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director Corporate Services

 

Executive Summary

 

The End of Term Report provides an overview of Council’s progress in implementing the Community Strategic Plan for the current term of Council. The report identifies the results for the community and council as reported in Council’s Delivery Program and Operational Plans for this period.

 

The report has been prepared in accordance with the Office of Local Government Integrated Planning and Reporting Guidelines and Section 428 (2) of the Local Government Act (1993).

 

Please note that the Microsoft Word version of the End of Term report has been included as an attachment to this report. The attached End of Term report will be graphically designed in line with Council's Style Guide and included within the Annual Report before being published to the website. These are due to be uploaded on Council’s website by 30 November 2021.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council notes and receives the End of Term Report which outlines the progress in implementing the Community Strategic Plan – Our Home Liverpool 2027.

 

REPORT

 

On 26 April 2017, Council adopted the Community Strategic Plan - Our Home, Liverpool 2027. The Community Strategic Plan outlines the community’s vision and priorities for Liverpool. The plan was developed after extensive engagement with the community and contains four directions for the future of Liverpool. These directions are underpinned by the quadruple bottom line and guide Council’s operations and service delivery for the next ten years.

 

Under the Local Government Act 1993, Council is required to produce a report on its progress in implementing the Community Strategic Plan during the term of Council. The report identifies outcomes and achievements in implementing the Community Strategic Plan – Our Home, Liverpool 2027.

 

Section 428 (2) of the Local Government Act (1993) requires Council to provide the report to be tabled at the last meeting of the outgoing Council. It should include information and outcomes of the goals and subsequent principal activities that have been detailed in the Delivery Program and Operational Plans for this period.

 

During the Council term from years 2017 – 2021, Council delivered a range of initiatives including supporting economic growth and completing major capital works projects to improve the infrastructure of the Liverpool local government area. Council spent a total of 278.4 million in Capital Works from financial years 2016/17 to 2020/21. These included the completion of the Macquarie Mall gateway and the Cirillo Reserve Sporting Complex at Middleton Grange.

 

Council was faced with the COVID-19 pandemic during the period. Council pivoted many face-to-face services to digital formats including workshops and events to continue to engage the community and provide essential services.

 

The attached report provides comprehensive information on Council’s progress in implementing the Community Strategic Plan – Our Home 2027 against all of the directions and goals outlined in the document. It provides the opportunity to demonstrate and report on Council’s performance during its term of office for the years 2017-2021.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Council’s Community Strategic Plan is underpinned by the quadruple bottom line which includes economic considerations.

Environment

Council’s Community Strategic Plan is underpinned by the quadruple bottom line which includes environmental considerations


Social

Council’s Community Strategic Plan is underpinned by the quadruple bottom line which includes social considerations


Civic Leadership

The End of Term report, outlines Council’s progress in implementing the community’s priorities, as outlined in the Community Strategic Plan – Our Home Liverpool 2027. It provides the opportunity to demonstrate and report on Council’s performance during its term of office for the years 2017-2021.

Legislative

The End of Term report has been developed in line with the Local Government Act 1993. 

In particular Section 428 (2) of the Local Government Act states:

“The annual report in the year in which an ordinary election of councillors is to be held must also report as to the council's achievements in implementing the community strategic plan over the previous 4 years.”

Risk

The risk is deemed Low as the End of Term report (attached) is now tabled before Council. It should be noted that failure to provide the End of Term Report to Council and the community at the last meeting of the outgoing Council may result in non-compliance with the above legislation and may result in enforceable action by the Office of Local Government.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Our Home Liverpool 2027 - End of Term Report, November 2021 (Under separate cover)  


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Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Corporate Services Report

 

CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Meet the challenges of Liverpool’s growing population

File Ref

357718.2021

Report By

Earl Paradeza - Senior Management Accountant

Approved By

Vishwa Nadan - Chief Financial Officer

 

Executive Summary

 

In June 2021 Council adopted its 2021-22 operating budget with projected revenue of $305.6m and expenditure of $219.5m. In terms of the net operating result before grants and contributions provided for capital purposes, Council budgeted for an operating deficit of $11.556m. Council further resolved to receive a report back as part of the first quarter budget review identifying strategies to reduce net operating deficit and bring Council to a balanced budget.

 

The budget included provision for 130 additional staff positions which were either kept unfilled during COVID-19 or roles required to support growing community demand on services. These positions are currently being reviewed. The budget also made provision for significant increase in non-cash depreciation expenditure and accounting for removal of road infrastructure resulting from asset renewals.

 

At the time the 2020/21 budget was formulated, the second round of COVID-19 and subsequent health lockdown orders were not anticipated. From mid-June 2021, Council’s priorities changed to deal with COVID -19 related matters impacting on council operations and community.

 

Council’s budget performance position and targets for forward years will be addressed through long-term financial planning process in consultation with the in-coming elected Council.

 

The proposed budget changes will further increase the budgeted operating deficit before grants and contributions for capital purposes to $14.196m (Ref attachment 1 – Note D).

 

The first quarter budget review for 2021/22 has resulted in $7.877m overall increase in Council’s capital expenditure program (Ref attachment 1 – Note E).

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council approves the identified budget variations in accordance with this report.

 

REPORT

 

Legislative Requirements

 

Clause 203(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires the Responsible Accounting Officer to provide a quarterly budget review not later than two months after each quarter's end. This report provides an overview of the results on the financial review for the quarter ended 30 September 2021.

 

Commentary

 

Operating Budget

 

In June 2021 Council adopted its 2021-22 operating budget with projected revenue of $305.6m and expenditure of $219.5m. In terms of the net operating result before grants and contributions provided for capital purposes, Council budgeted for an operating deficit of $11.556m. Council further resolved to receive a report back as part of the first quarter budget review identifying strategies to reduce net operating deficit and bring Council to a balanced budget.

 

The budget included provision for 130 additional staff positions which were either kept unfilled during COVID-19 or roles required to support growing community demand on services. These positions are currently being reviewed. The budget also made provision for significant increase in non-cash depreciation expenditure and accounting for removal of road infrastructure resulting from asset renewals.

 

At the time budget was formulated, second round of COVID-19 and subsequent health lockdown orders were not anticipated. From mid-June 2021, Council’s priorities changed to deal with COVID -19 related matters impacting on council operations and community.

 

Council’s budget performance position and targets for forward years will be addressed through long-term financial planning process in consultation with the in-coming elected Council.

 

A comprehensive budget review conducted at 30 September 2021 has resulted in further budget adjustments, as detailed in Attachment 2. As part of the Budget Review, managers have conducted a review of their programs with a view to providing a revised forecast for the financial year ended 30 June 2022. Managers take into consideration events that have occurred to date and/or information that has become available since the adoption of the original budget and the impact of which provides the basis for the budget adjustments.

 

The review has resulted in $2.017m (Ref attachment 1 – Note A) increase in total revenue mainly attributed to the following:

·     +$2.1m    Transport for NSW grant towards upgrade and construction of car park;

·     +$1.1m    Public Spaces Legacy Program for Denham Court Road upgrade and Carnes Hill Stage 2;

·     +$0.99k   DPIE grants for Aerotropolis planning

·     +$0.96m  Transport for NSW grant including 30km Traffic Calming project;

·     +$0.95m  LRCI Phase 3 grants for various civil construction projects;

·     +$250k    COIVD-19 grant from Office of Local Government;

·     -$2.4m     Loss of income due to COVID-19 lockdown and restrictions;

·     -$1.7m     Unsuccessful grants and reduction due to amended scope of works; and

·     -$595k     Anticipated lease of 35 Scott Street unlikely to be secured this financial year.

 

 

Total expenditure is projected to increase by net $1.396m (Ref attachment 1 – Note B), mainly comprising:

·     +$1.6m    Engagement of consultant for Western Sydney Aerotropolis funded from DPIE grants;

·     +$220k    New depot setup costs to reduce COVID-19 transmission;

·     +$100k    Additional employee costs in Development Assessment funded from DPIE grant;

·     +$100k    Council’s FY 2021-22 contribution to WSPP;

·     +$74k      Audit of existing gross pollutant traps (GPT) within the Georges River catchment;

·     +$70k      Food Organic Garden Organic (FOGO) implementation plan;

·     +$70k      Engagement of consultant for mattress recycling feasibility study;

·     -$740k     Operational savings due to COVID-19 lockdown and restrictions;

·     -$130k     Reduction of anticipated operational costs due to delay in opening of Lurnea Hub; and

·     -$114k     Operational savings to fund various capital projects.

 

The proposed budget changes will increase the budgeted operating deficit before grants and contributions for capital purposes to $14.196m (Ref attachment 1 – Note D).

 

Capital Budget

 

In June 2021, Council approved its $256.1m capital works program for 2021/22. Council subsequently approved carry over of projects valued $19.1m that were planned but not completed in 2020/21.

 

The first quarter budget review has resulted in $8.027m increase to Council’s capital expenditure program (Ref attachment 1 – Note E). The budget adjustments include the following:

·      +$2.1m    Costs towards the design and construction of a new CPAC commuter carpark, upgrading the existing carpark and the opening of Woodbrook Road underpass.;

·      +$979k    Reconstruction and resurfacing of pavements of Nuwarra Road, Moorebank;

·      +$950k    Road reconstruction and resurfacing funded from LRCI Program;

·      +$880k    GMD/New Bridge Road intersection upgrade and road reconstruction;

·      +$668k    Installation of traffic calming devices to support the 30 km/h high pedestrican activity area in the City Centre;

·      +$645k    Acquisition of part of Open Space LP17 – Austral;

·      +$600k    Construction of pits and installation of pipes and GPT at Casula Parkland;

·      +$435k    Streetscape improvement Macquarie Street public spaces in between Moore Street and Scott Street;

·      +$350k    Engagement of design consultant Carnes Hill Recreation Precinct Stage 2;

·      +$350k    Engagement of consultant for the design of Edmondson Park – Sinozich Park; and

·      +$227k    Expansion of Western Works Depot Office.

 

At 30 September 2021, Council has a capital expenditure program of $283.3m as detailed in Attachment 3.

 

The YTD capital expenditure to 30 September 2021 was $8.4m.

 

The Table 1 below provides summary of the budget results:

 

 

Details of the proposed budget changes are provided in the attachments.

 

Attachment 1 - Quarter 1 Budget Review Summary (QBRS): This report presents a summary of Council's budgeted financial position at the end of the quarter. The key indicators include:

1.    The revised budgeted income and expenditure for the year against the original estimate of annual income and expenditure as shown in Council’s Operational Plan

2.    Changes following Quarter 1 budget review

3.    The proposed revised budget for 2021/22 financial year

 

Attachment 2 – This report provides details of operating budget adjustments

 

Attachment 3 – This report provides details of capital budget adjustments

 

Attachment 4 & 5 – Grants Status Report: Has two components, first listing all annual grant submissions and second, listing all grants that have been applied for during the quarter detailing the project title, amount sought, funding body and status of the application. Council officers are continually seeking alternate sources of funding as opportunities arise.

 

Attachment 6 - Cash and Investments Statement: Providing a reconciliation of restricted and unrestricted funds to the level of Cash and Investments held as at 30 September 2021

 

Attachment 7 – Key Performance Indicators

 

Attachment 8 - Consultancy and Legal Expenses

 

Attachment 9 - Contracts and Other Expenses

 

Attachment 10 - City Development Fund and Environment Levy

 

This Report recommends that Council receives and notes the report and votes the budget variations in accordance with this report.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

The revised budget net operating result before Grants and Contributions following Quarter 1 Budget Review and Council resolutions to 30 September 2021 will be a deficit of $14.196m.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Deliver services that are customer focused.

Operate a well-developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

Risk

Clause 203(1) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 requires the Responsible Accounting Officer to provide a quarterly budget review not later than two months after each quarter's end. Breach of legislation if not done.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         QBRS - Consolidated Financial Results

2.         Operating Budget Adjustments

3.         Capital Budget Adjustments

4.         Grant Status Reports - Applications

5.         Grant Status Report - Received

6.         Cash & Investment Report

7.         Key Performance Indicators

8.         Consultancy & Legal Expenses Budget Review Statement

9.         Contracts & Other Expenses Statements

10.       City Development Fund & Environment Levy Reserves


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CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2021

Attachment 1

QBRS - Consolidated Financial Results

 

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CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2021

Attachment 2

Operating Budget Adjustments

 

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CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2021

Attachment 3

Capital Budget Adjustments

 

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CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2021

Attachment 4

Grant Status Reports - Applications

 

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CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2021

Attachment 5

Grant Status Report - Received

 

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CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2021

Attachment 6

Cash & Investment Report

 

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CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2021

Attachment 7

Key Performance Indicators

 

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CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2021

Attachment 8

Consultancy & Legal Expenses Budget Review Statement

 

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CORP 04

Budget Review - September 2021

Attachment 9

Contracts & Other Expenses Statements

 

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Budget Review - September 2021

Attachment 10

City Development Fund & Environment Levy Reserves

 

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Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

City Presentation Report

 

PRES 01

Review of Waste Technologies

 

Strategic Direction

Strengthening and Protecting our Environment

Manage the community’s disposal of rubbish

File Ref

355488.2021

Report By

Tim Pasley - Manager Waste and Cleansing

Approved By

Peter Diplas - Director City Presentation

 

Executive Summary

 

Council has requested at its meeting on 27 October 2021 through a Notice of Motion that a report be presented in relation to recycling waste without having to separate waste at the point of collection. Council requested that the report:

 

“Considers and compares any possible advantage or disadvantage between waste recycling procedures that either separate waste at point of pick up similar to what Council has now and those that do not separate waste at point of pick up from homes, similar to technologies offered through Bioelektra as an example who is currently engaged in a State Significant Development recycling waste in a “joint” project with Shoalhaven City Council.”

 

This report looks at Council’s current process, the legislation, and Federal and State Government Strategies to compare what methods of waste management are available to Council.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Notes the report; and

 

2.    Continues with FOGO (Food Organics Garden Organics) Waste Management as mandated in the NSW Waste and Sustainable Materials Strategy 2041.

 

REPORT

 

Council’s Current Waste Collection Service

 

Council currently provides waste collection services for the following waste streams for the community as outlined in the table below.

 

Type of Services

Frequency

SUDs

MUDs

Garbage

Weekly

140L/240L

140L/ 240L/660L/1100L

Recycling

Fortnightly

240L

240L/ 360L/660L/1100L

Garden Organics

Fortnightly

240L

On request

Bulky Waste

 

2 Booked service per year

Equivalent to 2 Booked Service per year

Metal

 

Unlimited Booked collection per year

Unlimited Booked collection per year

 

Waste Processing and Disposal

Once collected, the waste is processed and or disposed. Council’s current waste processing and recovery options are outlined in the table below.

 

Type of Services

Contractor

Current Process

Garbage

Suez

The contract commenced with the processing of waste, but changes to the EPA Regulations resulted in waste now disposed at landfill

Recyclables

Visy

Processed by Visy at their MRF to recover, paper, aluminium cans, plastic, and glass.

Garden Organics

ANL via Suez

Processed by ANL to fully recover compost to be used in agriculture and land application.

Bulky Waste

Cleanaway

Processed by Cleanaway at their waste facility to recover 60% of resources.

Metal

SIMS Metal

Metal is fully recovered and recycled.

 

Waste Collection Contract

 

Council has recently entered into a contract with JJ Richards and Sons Pty Ltd for the collection of the following waste streams:

·     Recyclables collection;

·     Garbage collection;

·     Garden organics collection.

 

This contract commenced on 1 July 2021 and will end on 30 June 2028 (7-year contract term).

The contract also includes the option for the collection of FOGO when Council acts on the Resolution of Council to implement FOGO collection. The changeover in the contract includes:

·     Supply and delivery of kitchen caddy for food waste;

·     The change of bin lids; and

·     Supply of FOGO bins where required.

 

Through this contract, council has also committed to education for recycling, organics collection and FOGO collection.

 

Federal Government Policies and Strategies

 

Several national and state level legislative frameworks apply to this operational context. They include the following:

 

Environment Protection

 

National Environment Protection Act 1994 (Commonwealth) – binds all State and Territory jurisdictions to the principles of Ecologically Sustainable Development.

 

This means that any development including those that are relevant to waste infrastructure are sustainable in the long term.

 

National Waste Policy

 

National Waste Policy 2018: From Waste to Resources – The 2018 National Waste Policy: Less waste, more resources was agreed by Australia’s Environment Ministers and the President of the Australian Local Government Association in December 2018. It sets a new unified direction for waste and recycling in Australia. The policy provides a framework for collective, national action on waste management, recycling and resource recovery to 2030.

National targets adopted under the 2018 National Waste Policy are:

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1.    Ban the export of waste plastic, paper, glass and tyres, commencing in the second half of 2020

2.    Reduce total waste generated in Australia by 10% per person by 2030

3.    80% average resource recovery rate from all waste streams following the waste hierarchy by 2030

4.    Significantly increase the use of recycled content by governments and industry

5.    Phase out problematic and unnecessary plastics by 2025

6.    Halve the amount of organic waste sent to landfill by 2030

7.    Make comprehensive, economy-wide and timely data publicly available to support better consumer, investment and policy decisions.

 

Key elements of the National Policy 2018 that are relevant to Council at the current stage include:

 

Halve the amount of organic waste sent to landfill by 2030

 

“Australian communities expect the products separated for recycling are processed and remanufactured into new products.”

 

The National Policy 2018 also highlights the preference for waste management before waste is disposed, putting a big emphasis on:

·     Waste avoidance;

·     Waste reduction;

·     Reuse; and

·     Recycling of waste.

 

Before treatment is applied to waste, every effort should be made to meet the above methods of managing waste and to get the cleanest recovery of resources.

 

National Food Waste Strategy

 

National Food Waste Strategy 2017- Provides a framework to support collective action towards halving Australia’s food organics by 2030.

 

The National Food Waste Strategy 2017 states that:

 

“To help reduce greenhouse gas emissions generated from food waste as part of the broader organic waste stream, the Australian Government has implemented a Source Separated Organic Waste method.”

 

The Federal Government through the National Food Waste Strategy 2017 is assisting State and Territory government by:

 

 

“Providing financial support for local government roll-out of residential food waste diversion through green organics bins.”

 

NSW Government Policies and Strategies

 

NSW Government in line with the Federal Government has a number of legislations, strategies and policies in place that guide the infrastructure development in NSW. The most relevant strategies and policies are:

·     NSW Waste and Sustainable Materials Strategy 2041;

·     Mixed Waste Organic Output (MWOO) Regulations; and

·     Energy from waste Policy 2021.

 

NSW Waste and Sustainable Materials Strategy

 

The Department of Planning, Industry and Environment, including the NSW EPA, led the development of the new 20-Year Waste Strategy for NSW which was released in mid-June 2021, titled “NSW Waste and Sustainable Materials Strategy 2041”.

 

The Strategy provides a long-term strategic focus where communities, industry and all levels of government are working together, to build resilient services and markets for waste resources.

 

The Department of Planning, Industry and Environment have further emphasised that the focus of the Strategy for NSW will need key reforms that will include:

·     Phasing out problematic single-use plastic items.

·     Financial incentives for manufacturers and producers to design out problematic plastics.

·     Having government agencies prefer recycled content.

·     Mandating the separation of food and garden organics for households and selected businesses.

·     Incentivising biogas generation from waste materials.

 

The key targets adopted by the NSW Waste and Sustainable Materials Strategy are:

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Description automatically generatedReduce total waste generated by 10% per person by 2030.

·     Have an 80% average recovery rate from all waste streams by 2030.

·     Significantly increase the use of recycled content by governments and industry.

·     Phase out problematic and unnecessary plastics by 2025.

·     Halve the amount of organic waste sent to landfill by 2030.

·     Reduce litter by 60% by 2030 and plastics litter by 30% by 2025.

·     Triple the plastics recycling rate by 2030.

 

The Strategy has set out three focus areas which are:

1.    Meeting our future infrastructure and service needs – As waste volumes continue to grow, infrastructure and services will need to keep pace. Council will need to ensure the capacity to meet critical future needs, such as residual waste capacity;

2.    Reducing carbon emissions through better waste and materials management - Transitioning to a circular economy means increasing our resource efficiency and reducing our carbon footprint including mandating FOGO collection to remove food waste from going to landfill; and

3.    Protect the environment and human health from waste pollution - Pollution from waste can be caused by littering, illegal dumping and mishandling of hazardous wastes, and it costs NSW millions of dollars each year.

 

Key elements of the NSW Waste and Sustainable Materials Strategy 2041, that is relevant to Council at the current stage for waste processing is:

 

Mandating the separation of food and garden organics for households and selected businesses.

 

Mixed Waste Organic Output (MWOO) Regulatory Changes

 

In October 2018, the NSW EPA stopped the use of mixed waste organic material on agriculture land and is ceasing use of plantation forests and mine rehabilitation land.  Mixed waste organic output (MWOO) material is produced at waste treatment facilities from the organic materials in household general waste (red-lid-bin) and then applied to land as a soil amendment.

As part of their regulatory role, NSW EPA commissioned a multi-year research program to investigate potential impacts of the use of this material. The research concluded that there are limited agriculture or soil benefits from applying mixed waste organic material at the current regulated rates. However, there are physical contaminants, such as small pieces of plastic and glass, and potential environmental risks, but very limited human health risks.

 

After reviewing previous and new assessments of the human health and ecological risks of applying MWOO to land, the EPA’s position is that it does not intend to grant any general exemptions or issue any related orders allowing MWOO to be used as a soil amendment on agricultural, mining rehabilitation or forestry land.

 

A key point to note for Council in terms of choosing the technology for waste processing is:

 

“EPA’s position is that it does not intend to grant any general exemptions or issue any related orders allowing MWOO to be used as a soil amendment on agricultural, mining rehabilitation or forestry land.”

 

Energy from Waste Policy

 

In 2015, the NSW EPA released the Energy from Waste Policy Statement to support increased investment in energy from waste infrastructure and deliver regulatory certainty to industry.

 

In 2021, the EPA updated the Energy from Waste Policy Statement to reflect the latest advice on air emissions standards from the NSW Chief Scientist and Engineer to ensure NSW has air emission standards that meet and exceed world best practice.

 

The EWP Policy sets out a framework for the operation of new purpose-built facilities and other existing facilities and is the primary policy in NSW that governs our assessment of energy from waste proposals. The Policy and EPA’s licensing framework ensure any facility is benchmarked and assessed against international best practice.

 

The Policy underpins the key objectives of NSW’s waste legislation and is a key consideration in any assessment, being:

·     Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997: the framework to ensure human health and the environment are protected; and

·     Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Act 2001 (WARR Act): to ensure waste management is considered in an orderly manner (in accordance with the outcomes to avoid, reuse, recycle and energy recovery).

 

As part of the EPA’s new Waste and Sustainable Materials Strategy 2041, the NSW Government is considering further strategic planning needs for energy from waste infrastructure to ensure such projects protect the environment and human health into the future, and maximise efficiencies for waste innovation, management, and energy recovery.

 

A key point to note for Council is the prerequisite for use for material for energy as stated in the Energy from Waste policy Statement, 2021 is that:

 

“There is no limit by weight of the waste stream received at an energy processing facility for material where Council has separate collection systems for dry recyclables and food and garden waste.”

 

Council’s Current Policies and Strategies

 

Council has a very active involvement in waste management and a very committed team of staff that are delivering the service to the community.

 

Liverpool City Council had developed its own policies in line with Federal and State Government Legislation, Strategies and Polices and have also been one of the few Councils that are forward thinking in terms of waste management. The key policies and strategies that Council has adopted include:

·     Waste Management and Resource Recovery Strategy 2021-2031

·     Introduction of Food Organics and Garden Organics (FOGO)

 

Waste Management and Resource Recovery Strategy

 

At Council’s Ordinary Meeting of 29 September 2021, Council adopted its Waste Management and Resource Recovery Strategy 2021-2031 to be placed on public exhibition. The strategy is targeted towards:

·     Improving Council’s waste recovery rate;

·     Implementing circular economy principles through various projects;

·     Meeting its obligations of waste management for the community;

·     Meeting the growing population of the LGA; and

·     Working in line with State and Federal Government legislation, Policies and Strategies.

 

Council’s Position on FOGO

 

Liverpool City Council was one of the first councils to adopt FOGO as way of managing organics following the release of the new “NSW Waste and Sustainable Materials Strategy 2041”. Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 30 June 2021 resolved to adopt that Council:

1.    Adopt FOGO collection as the way of recovering food organics from the red lid bin;

2.    Undertake a request for tender (RFT) process for the receival and processing of FOGO;

3.    Undertake a RFT for the receival and process of residual mixed solid waste with a view of converting the residual mixed solid waste to energy if the technology and facility is available within the contract term;

4.    Act on the option for collection of FOGO in the current waste collection contract, to introduce FOGO collection when the FOGO processing and mixed solid waste contract is in place;

5.    Undertake a detailed FOGO implementation plan and education program; and

6.    Apply for further NSW EPA Grants that are available for FOGO implementation.

 

Brief History of Waste Management in Sydney, NSW

 

From the time of European settlement in in NSW and in Sydney, waste disposal has changed from direct disposal to waterways leading to the creation of Tank Streams in Sydney, to sorting of waste and mechanical treatment recover resources.

 

In the late 18th century, when the population was small, and the waste was mainly organics, the residents of Sydney disposed of their own waste using “cesspits” dug out on their yard.

 

As Sydney grew from a town to a city, waste disposal and management became a major issue not just to citizens but also to state and local governments due to health concerns. Most of the waste was used to reclaim land. Ocean dumping soon became a common practice in the late 19th century and continued into the early 20th century.

 

However, when the Bubonic Plague claimed over 100 lives in Sydney in 1901, the hygienic disposal of waste became a major public health concern. As a result, incineration, which had been used in England since 1847, was introduced in Sydney as the most effective waste management solution.

 

In the 1950s, as the population grew, new suburbs and houses were needed, and this called for land reclamation. Household and industrial waste were used to cover the layer of the reclaimed land. But unlike today, engineers failed to use impervious material that could prevent leakage into streams and groundwater.

 

In the 1960s, growth in population in cities such as Sydney led to the increase of waste. Most of this waste either ended in the ocean or in private landfills. This created major environmental and health problems in the city.

 

From the late 1970s and 1980s, separate collection of recyclables was introduced, then in the 1990s separate green waste and now food is also separated from the waste to get the best organic output.

 

Waste Processing Options

 

Waste processing of each stream of waste are interrelated and is subject to how the waste is separated.

 

There are several different combinations of collection of waste streams that leads to the use of different technologies for processing of waste. Some of these that are relevant to Councils in NSW are:

·     Comingled Recycling and Waste Collection

·     Comingled Recycling, Waste and Garden Organics Collection

·     Comingled Recycling, Waste and FOGO Collection

 

Each combination of waste collection is discussed below, including Bioelektra system that is proposed for Shoalhaven City Council the subject of comparison in this report.

 

Recycling with Only General Waste

 

Recycling with only general waste collection was the system utilised by Councils in the 1990s and a handful of Councils still maintain this system. The streams of waste collected are:

·     Yellow lid recycle bin – comingled recycling including paper, cardboard, plastic containers, glass bottles, aluminium cans and other metal.

·     Red lid general waste bin – all general household waste including food organics and garden organics

 

The process to deal with this system is outlined in the table below.

 

 

Comingled Recycling

General Waste with Food Waste and Garden Organics

Service

Technologies Used

Mechanical Recycling Facility

Alternative Waste Treatment (AWT) Facility or Landfill

Final Product

·    Paper

·    Plastic

·    Glass

·    Aluminium

·    Other metals (steel cans etc)

Recovered organics but not suitable for land application.

See section (MWOO ban)

Some material like recyclables that end up in the red bin can be recovered.

Comments

Changes to the government regulations means that this system of waste processing is costly to Councils and not environmentally acceptable. Essentially, the contents of red lid bins end up in landfill and is also subject to NSW EPA’s waste levy.

 

 

Recycling with General Waste and Garden Organics

 

Recycling with general waste collection and a separate garden organics collection is currently the system that is utilised by Liverpool City Council.

 

Liverpool City Council successfully entered into a Contract for the AWT solution in 2009 to recover organics and became one of the leading Councils in waste management by diverting around 70% of waste. However, in October 2018, NSW EPA banned the use of organics produced from AWT for land application rendering the AWT process redundant. This resulted in all the contents of red lid bin being sent to landfill. See section (MWOO ban).

 

The streams of waste collected are:

·     Yellow lid recycle bin – comingled recycling including paper, cardboard, plastic containers, glass bottles, aluminium cans and other metal.

·     Red lid general waste bin – all general household waste and food organics.

·     Green lid garden organics bin – garden organics including grass clippings.

 

The process to deal with this system is outlined in the table below.

 

 

Comingled Recycling

General Waste with Food Organics

Garden Organics

Service

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Technologies Used

Mechanical Recycling Facility

Landfill or AWT

Composting

Final Product

·    Paper

·    Plastic

·    Glass

·    Aluminium

·    Other metals (steel cans etc.)

Recovered organics but not suitable for land application. See section (MWOO ban)

Some recyclables from the red lid bins can be recovered.

Clean compost is recovered that is suitable for use in agriculture.

Comments

Organics recovered from Garden Organics bins is clean and usable for agriculture, forestry and mining. However, Food Organics recovered from red lid bins as organics is not suitable for use on land. Changes to the government regulations means that this system of waste processing is costly to Councils and not environmentally acceptable. Essentially, the contents of red lid bins end up in landfill and is subject to the NSW EPA’s waste levy.

 

Recycling with General Waste and FOGO

 

The three-bin system including, recycling, general waste and FOGO bin is the preferred waste collection system that has been heavily funded by the NSW Government for the last 15 years and now the NSW Waste and Sustainable Materials Strategy 2041, that was release in June 2021 and is: “Mandating food and garden organics collection for all NSW households and select businesses”

 

The Strategy states that: “The NSW State Government will require the separate collection of food and garden organics from all NSW Households by 2030.”

 

As discussed in a previous section (MWOO), Council has already resolved to introduce FOGO as a solution in 2024 and will be in line with the NSW Waste and Sustainable Materials Strategy 2041.

 

The streams of waste collected through this system are:

·     Yellow lid recycle bin – comingled recycling including paper, cardboard, plastic containers, glass bottles, aluminium cans and other metal.

·     Red lid general waste bin – all general household waste without food waste.

·     Green lid FOGO bin – garden organics including grass clippings and food organics (separated via use of kitchen caddies).

 

 

Comingled Recycling

General Waste

FOGO

Service

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Graphical user interface, application

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Technologies Used

Mechanical Recycling Facility

Energy from Waste facility or processed to recover material and create fuel cells.

FOGO Processing and Composting

Final Product

·    Paper

·    Plastic

·    Glass

·    Aluminium

·    Other metals (steel cans etc.)

Once food organics are removed, the contents of the red lid bin are eligible to be used at Energy from Waste Facility.

The process generates clean organics that can be used for agriculture and other land applications.

Comments

This system of collection and processing is the preferred way of dealing with domestic waste and is mandated by the NSW EPA.

Processing of FOGO also produces compost that is suitable for land application.

The NSW Energy from Waste Policy as discuss in section (MWOO), states that contents of red lid bin can be utilised directly at the energy from waste facility if council have separate collection systems for dry recyclables and food and garden waste.

 

Bioelektra System for Shoalhaven City Council

 

Shoalhaven City Council provides a weekly kerbside bin collection service for red-lid bins and a fortnightly collection for yellow-lid bins.

 

The streams of waste collected by Shoalhaven City Council are:

·     Yellow lid recycle bin – comingled recycling including paper, cardboard, plastic containers, glass bottles, aluminium cans and other metal.

·     Red lid general waste bin – all general household waste including food waste and garden organics.

 

Shoalhaven City Council residents do not have a dedicated green waste collection service. Council’s advice to the resident is to put garden waste in red lid bins. If the residents do have access to green waste, then they can organise a green waste pick up service through their “Green and Bulky Waste Collection Pick up Service”. They also provide “Garden (Green) Waste Disposal Vouchers”.

 

Shoalhaven City Council’s current “Waste Reduction Management Strategy” commenced in 2017/18 and covers up to 2021/22. The key drivers identified in the strategy are:

1.    The New Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy 2014-2021;

2.    Council’s requirement under the Local Government Act 1993 to have a long-term focus “Community Strategic Plan”

3.    Limited lifespan of the West Nowra Landfill Facility; and

4.    Forecasted population growth.

 

Contrary to the discussion often raised that Shoalhaven City Council is resorting to one bin for every type of waste, Shoalhaven City Council are heavily committed to comingled recycling.

 

Shoalhaven City Council’s move to waste processing is a result of the key driver of “Limited lifespan of the West Nowra Landfill Facility” and the fact that they are currently utilising the red lid bin for general waste, food waste and garden organics.

 

In a video posted on YouTube[1] by Council as part of their education to their residents, they are acknowledging that residents want green bins, similar to other councils, however, their solution is not to provide the green bin, but process the red lid bin through the Bioelektra Alternative Waste Treatment (AWT) system.

Funnel chart

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According to their Waste Strategy, Shoalhaven City Council’s waste audit has identified that there is significant amount of organics in their red lid bin and they have identified that an AWT such as Bioelektra would be the solution to recover the organics to extend the life of their landfill.

 

The red lid bins in Shoalhaven City Council has:

·     21% Garden organics;

·     27% food organics;

·     18% Nappies/Textiles/Timber;

·     12% Recyclables; and

·     22% Garbage

 

According to the “Summary of Infrastructure Action” from the Waste Strategy, one of the actions for 2018 was to Construct the Alternative Waste Treatment technology.

 

Table

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The Development Application[2] (DA) is now before Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) as a State Significant Development with Bioelektra as the AWT technology.

 

 

Comingled Recycling

General Waste with Food Waste and Garden Organics

Service

Graphical user interface, application

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Graphical user interface, application

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Technologies Used

Mechanical Recycling Facility

Bioelektra AWT System

Final Product

·      Paper

·      Plastic

·      Glass

·      Aluminium

·      Other metals (steel cans etc.)

Claim to produce:

·      Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) – Cement Australia

·      Biomass – Cement Australia/Casafico Pty Ltd

·      Plastics – Polymer Processors Pty Ltd

·      Glass – Casafico Pty Ltd

·      Metals – to be confirmed

·      Residue – West Nowra Landfill (adjacent site)

Comments

According to the DA documents lodged with DPIE, the material derived from AWT is not proposed to be utilised for land application. Any compost derived through this AWT process would not meet the requirements of the NSW EPA Regulations for land application of mixed waste organic output (MWOO).

The Bioelektra AWT system claims to recover 90% of material from the red lid bin, however it is not clear if there will be market for organic elements as RFT as proposed.

 

The neighbouring councils of Shoalhaven City Council have taken different approaches to Shoalhaven Council and are actively taking steps towards NSW Waste and Sustainable Material Strategy 2041.

·     Kiama Municipal Council – 3 bin system with FOGO to most of its residents;

·     Eurobodalla Shire Council – 3 bins system with Garden Organics but looking to introduce FOGO;

·     Goulburn Mulwaree Council – 3 bin system with FOGO collection already implemented;

·     Queanbeyan–Palerang Regional Council – 3 bin system with FOGO collection already implemented; and

·     Shellharbour City Council – 3 bin system with FOGO collection already implemented

 

Shoalhaven City Council adopted their Waste Strategy in 2017 when NSW EPA had not banned the use of MWOO for land application.

 

Shoalhaven City Council’s timeline to enter a Contract with Bioelekra is provided below:

·     Tenders issued – August 2017

·     Tenders closed – February 2018

·     Council Resolution – October 2018

·     Announcement of Pending Contract (in principle agreement) – January 2019

·     Execution of Contract – December 2020

 

Bioelektra – Hypothetical One Bin System

 

Whist Shoalhaven City Council’s proposed use of the Bioelektra AWT system is discussed in detail in section (MWOO), the following is a hypothetical scenario that has not been contemplated anywhere in Australia.

 

NSW and Australia as a whole, have a rich culture of recycling which is now complemented by the Container Deposit Scheme (CDS); a “Return and Earn” system where consumers can recover 10 cents for selected containers and drink bottles when they return it to the allocated collection points.

 

As a comparison to other collection systems discussed in this report, the one-bin collection system is summarised in the table below.

 

 

Waste, Recyclables and Organics Combined

Service

A picture containing bin, container

Description automatically generated

Technologies Used

Bioelektra – Alternative Waste Treatment (AWT)

Final Product

According to their website, Bioelektra claim to recover 96% of usable resources from municipal waste with only 4% going to landfill. They claim to recover:

·    Biomass – 30%

·    Refuse derived fuel (RDF) – 25%

·    Glass, metal and plastic – 18%

·    Minerals – 6%

·    Residue to landfill – 4%

Comments

Whilst Bioelektra claim to recover impressive 96% of resources, 30% of resources claimed is “Biomass”, which are organics.

The organics recovered will not be suitable under the NSW EPA’s Regulations to be applied to land.

 

While Bioelektra AWT system may recover material from municipal waste, and Shoalhaven City Council are utilising the technology, the output from the process does not align with the NSW Government’s direction or other Councils in NSW. Most Councils like Liverpool City Council that implemented AWT have all reverted back to other methods of dealing with contents of red lid bins with a firm roadmap towards implementation of FOGO.

 

Hypothetically, if only one bin system was implemented with Bioelektra AWT, here are some of the impacts it would have on current waste management include.

·     The organics produced could not be used for application on land;

·     There is not sufficient market for RDF particularly for organic based RDF;

·     It will not be in line with NSW Waste and Sustainable Materials Strategy 2041;

·     It is not going to be in line with the National Food Waste Strategy 2017;

·     The process is not going to be in line with the NSW Energy from Waste Policy;

·     Councils will have to reconfigure the bins to provide one large weekly collection of combined waste in one bin or two bins collected each week;

·     Re-educate the residents on the use of bins and the value of their consumption and use of resources as there would be no link between their behaviour and the environmental impact;

·     All waste related contract including, waste collection, waste processing, recyclables processing will have to be varied or terminated at a very high cost to Council;

·     Council will not be able to receive refunds from Container Deposit scheme that it currently either factored into the rate of processing of recyclables or Council receives as refund;

·     The quality of recyclables such as paper that attracts high value in the recycling market will not be recovered in the same format but would be composted and not recovered for recycling; and

·     Under the “China Sword” restriction on recyclables, the cans and bottles would not be in the same condition when recovered if they were recovered separately, resulting in low value resources.

 

Advantages and Disadvantages of One Bin System

 

The advantages and disadvantages are discussed based on what the NSW and Australian waste management practices, legislation, strategies and policies.

 

Advantages

Disadvantages

1.   Collection is simple where only one type of bin that needs collection.

2.   There is no need to sort the waste.

3.   There will be no need to educate the residents.

1.   The organics produced could not be used for application on land

2.   It will not be in line with NSW Waste and Sustainable Materials Strategy 2041 which has mandated FOGO collection separately.

3.   The CDS revenue will not be available to Council

4.   Recyclables that are recovered cleanly will be contaminated when mixed with other waste. E.g. paper will not be able to be recovered, ultimately decreasing the value of the recyclables.

5.   Cost will be much higher. When presented separately, the cost of garden organics and FOGO and recyclables are significantly cheaper than processing every waste stream together.

6.   Council will not be able to utilise the Energy from Waste technology directly without processing the waste, which they are able to utilise if they have FOGO collection system in place.

7.   There will be no incentive for the residents to reduce the waste.

8.   Overall cost of the waste management to the community will increase.

 

A one bin system of waste collection and processing may be suitable in countries where there is no separation of waste and there has not been a long-term evolution of a culture of managing waste in a sustainable and responsible way, however, in Australia and particularly in NSW, the current legislation, regulation and strategies will not allow such a system.

 

Compared to where the waste industry is at the moment, a one bin system of waste collection would prove to be a costly move with minimal environmental benefit.

 

Advantages of 3 Bin FOGO System

 

FOGO collection has a lot of advantages for Councils and the community when it comes to the environment, waste management and the cost.

 

As outlined below, some of the advantages include:

 

Reduction in Greenhouse Gas

Waste rich in organics (the current contents of the red lid bins including food organics) when they end up in the landfill generate methane which is equivalent to 23 to 25 time of carbon dioxide (CO2). The waste in its current form to the landfill is a major contributor of greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Introduction of FOGO collection would remove the food organics from the red lid bin thereby removing the quantity of organics going to landfill.

 

Cost of Food Organics Collection and Processing

 

The introduction of FOGO collection is the most effective way to ensure that food waste is removed from the general waste stream. The food waste collection combined with garden organics collection makes an economically viable way of removing food waste from the general waste stream with minimal increase in truck movement.

 

The cost of processing for food organics is lower than the cost of landfill. Food organics combined with Garden Organics is far more cost effective to process as opposed to processing of food waste while it is in the red lid bin. The contents of the red lid bin attracts the NSW EPA’s Waste Levy which is $147.10 per tonne at the time of writing this report.

 

Diversion of Waste from Landfill

 

With FOGO collection, Council will be able to divert an additional 40% of waste that is currently in the red lid bin which also ends up in the landfill. With the introduction of FOGO, Council will be able to achieve diversions of over 65% (along with recyclables) which is closer to the NSW EPA’s current target of achieving 70% diversion.

 

Landfill in the Sydney region is a becoming scarce and comes at a premium for per tonne of waste that is accepted at the landfill.

 

Use of Council’s Residual Waste for Fuel

 

Under the NSW government’s Waste to Energy Policy, the waste from red lid bins can be used to derive energy if Council has a FOGO collection. That is if food waste is removed from the led lid bins, then the material in the red lid bin becomes eligible for “waste to energy” process.

 

Introduction of FOGO will further open the door for Council to divert more waste from landfill by using the red lid bin contents for deriving energy.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

Minimise household and commercial waste.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Economy & Commercial Development Report

 

ECD 01

Dedication of Lot 613 in DP1268345 First Avenue, Hoxton Park as Public Road

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

347359.2021

Report By

Manor Raman - Property Officer

Approved By

John F Morgan - Director Economy & Commercial Development

 

Executive Summary

 

On 30 September 2020, Council resolved to acquire part of 13 First Avenue, Hoxton Park, being part of Lot 61B in DP389791 for construction of a new roundabout to improve traffic movement and improve safety at the intersection. As part of the land acquisition for this project, the parcel acquired is identified as Lot 613 in DP 1268345 (Lot 613). Lot 613 is required to be dedicated as Public Road upon completion of construction works.

 

Lot 613 is located at the intersection of First Avenue and Twentieth Avenue, Hoxton Park and comprises an area of 28.3 square metres.

 

As all construction works are now completed, the dedication as Public Road can be gazetted subject to Council approval.

 

This Report recommends that Council resolves to dedicate Lot 613 in DP 1268345 as Public Road in accordance with the section 10 of the Roads Act 1993.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Resolves to dedicate Lot 613 DP1268345 as Public Road in accordance with the Roads Act 1993; and

 

2.    Authorises the CEO or his delegated officer to execute any documents required, under Power of Attorney, necessary to give effect to this decision.

 

 

 

 

 

 

REPORT

 

On 30 September 2020, Council resolved to acquire part of 13 First Avenue, Hoxton Park, being part of Lot 61B in DP389791 for construction of a new roundabout to improve traffic movement and improve safety at the intersection. As part of the land acquisition for this project, the parcel acquired is identified as Lot 613 in DP 1268345 (Lot 613). Lot 613 is required to be dedicated as Public Road upon completion of all construction works.

 

Lot 613 is located at the intersection of First Avenue and Twentieth Avenue, Hoxton Park and comprises an area of 28.3 square metres.

 

The area acquired is shown outlined in red on the map below.

 

 

 

As all construction works are now completed, the dedication as Public Road can be gazetted under Section 10 of the Roads Act 1993 subject to Council approval.

 

Section 10 of the Roads Act 1993 states that “RMS or a Council may, by notice published in the Gazette, dedicate any land held by it (including land acquired by it under Division 1 of Part 12) as a public road”.

 

This Report recommends that Council resolves to dedicate Lot 613 in DP 1268345 as Public Road in accordance with the section 10 of the Roads Act 1993.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Roads Act 1993

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Nil


0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Economy & Commercial Development Report

 

ECD 02

TfNSW proposed Construction Lease over Council land being part Lot 5000 DP 855173 off Albemarle Place, Cecil Hills

 

Strategic Direction

Generating Opportunity

Meet the challenges of Liverpool’s growing population

File Ref

353372.2021

Report By

John Milicic - Manager Property

Approved By

John F Morgan - Director Economy & Commercial Development

 

Executive Summary

 

Transport for NSW (TfNSW) have previously written to Council seeking a Construction Lease of approximately 820 square metres over Council land, being part of Lot 5000 DP 855173 at Albemarle Place, Cecil Hills, as part of its M12 Motorway, M7 to Northern Road project. It was identified that the construction lease would be required for a four-year period.

 

The construction lease was identified as being required to facilitate the M12 project, with timely entry to the land required, to undertake essential construction works to deliver this critical state significant infrastructure.

 

A report was submitted to the Council meeting on 27 October 2021 which was deferred to this meeting to seek a response from TfNSW to questions taken on notice at that meeting.

 

The response provided by TfNSW is included as an attachment to this report. TfNSW as part of its response have also identified a reduction in the proposed construction lease area from 820 square metres down to 397 square metres.

 

TfNSW’s initial proposal included a rental offer to Council of $1pa, if demanded. TfNSW were advised that the minimum that Council could consider was a rate of $35 per square metre plus GST per annum, as per Council’s Fees, and Charges, this would now equate to a rental of $13,895 plus GST per annum, or $55,580 plus GST, for the four-year period, based on a construction lease area of 397 square metres.

 

TfNSW have requested that Council consent to the compulsory acquisition of a four-year construction lease. As the land is classified as “Community” land, Council cannot consent to a dealing, however, Council can advise it has no objection to the compulsory acquisition process.

 

As Council is awaiting a further offer from TfNSW, it is recommended that Council resolves that it has no objection to the compulsory acquisition of the construction lease, for a period of 4 years, over part of Lot 5000 DP 855173 situated off Albemarle Place, Cecil Hills, subject to agreement being made on the amount of compensation payable to Council. Or if agreement is not reached, that the compensation is determined by the Valuer General, with a further report to be provided to Council, to determine if the Valuer General’s determination will be acceptable to Council.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Resolves that it has no objection to TfNSW compulsorily acquiring a construction Lease, for a period of 4 years, over Part Lot 5000 DP 855173, situated off Albemarle Place, Cecil Hills, subject to agreement being made on the amount of compensation payable to Council, as outlined in this report.

 

2.    Resolves, that if agreement is not reached on the compensation amount, payable to Council, that it has no objection to the acquisition of the construction lease by TfNSW by compulsory process, including the reduction of the period of the Proposed Acquisition Notice (PAN) to 14 days.

 

3.    Resolves, that if agreement is not made to the amount of compensation payable and the compensation is determined by the Valuer General that a further report be provided to Council to determine if The Valuer General’s determination will be acceptable to Council.

 

4.    Delegates authority to, and directs the CEO and his delegates to, enter into negotiations with TfNSW for compensation at no less than the occupancy fee rate identified in Council’s Fees and Charges and

 

5.    Authorises its delegated officer to execute any document, under Power of Attorney, necessary to give effect to this decision.

 

6.    Notes the attached response provided by TfNSW to the questions taken on notice regarding this matter from Council’s meeting of 27 October 2021.

 

REPORT

 

Transport for NSW (TfNSW) have previously written to Council seeking a Construction Lease of approximately 820 square metres over Council land, being part Lot 5000 DP 855173 at Albemarle Place, Cecil Hills, as part of its M12 Motorway, M7 to Northern Road project. It was identified that the construction lease would be required for a four-year period (with provision to be extended) which is expected to commence in mid-2022.

 

Council’s land, being Lot 5000 DP 855173, has a total area of 1.469 hectares and forms part of a buffer between the adjoining Elizabeth Drive and residential homes, situated off Albemarle Place and Isabel Street, at Cecil Hills. The land is zoned, RE1-Public Recreation, and is classified as “Community” land.

 

The TfNSW proposal for road construction, at the above location, was identified as requiring a construction lease for temporary road construction over part of the subject land, shown by green hatching on the attached plan (TfNSW Sketch Plan SR 5459).

 

Extract of Original TfNSW Proposal Plan (Construction lease Area hatched Green)

 

TfNSW advised that access to the proposed construction lease area would only be via Elizabeth Drive, as the land is only required for temporary construction purposes associated with Elizabeth Drive. TfNSW also advised that consultation had taken place for the project, as per the EIS and amendment assessment process. It was also advised that any removed vegetation would be reinstated on a “like for like” basis, where possible, and in accordance with urban and landscaping design plans.

 

A report was submitted to the Council meeting on 27 October 2021 to consider the TfNSW request, which was deferred to this meeting to seek a response from TfNSW to the following questions taken on notice:

 

·     ECD 01 – TfNSW Proposed Construction lease over Council land being part Lot 5000 DP 855173 off Albemarle Place, Cecil Hills

i.      Clr Shelton asked: In terms of the proposed compulsorily acquired lease that may turn out for construction works, the relevant area shows quite a lot of trees and asked whether the terms of the lease for the construction work is going to result in the loss off trees and if so, whether there’s been consultation with the immediate adjacent residential land owners as they may have a view on the matter particularly if the trees which appear to act as a noise buffer are to be effected by the terms of the lease.

ii.     Clr Shelton asked if we’re aware of how many trees are proposed to be removed.

iii.    Clr Hagarty raised the issue of noise control measures. He advised that residents adjacent to Elizabeth Drive did request noise walls as part of the M12 and were denied.

 

To specifically address the questions raised by Councillors at the meeting on 27 October 2021, additional clarification was sought from TfNSW with a response also requested to the following:

1.    How many trees are likely to be affected/removed and replaced?

2.    What are the offset provisions if any tree was required to be removed?

3.    Will they be replaced alike for alike?

4.    In alike for alike, there is an expectation if a mature tree is removed that a tree of the same species, height/maturity will be provided to replace it. Is this the case, as concern was raised, about mature 20 year old trees being removed and replaced with small plantings.

5.    Will the same species of trees be replaced with same sized trees?

6.    What is the establishment period that TfNSW will be responsible for any trees provided as replacements on an alike for alike basis?

7.    What will be the hours of construction and use of the land proposed to be included in the construction lease?

8.    What controls were to be put in place regarding any noise impacts generated from the use of Council’s land under a construction lease

9.    Why were noise walls not being provided?

10.  If adjoining residents had requested a noise wall, why has a noise wall not been provisioned for, when there are noise walls on other sections of Elizabeth Drive?

11.  What noise assessment forecasts have been undertaken? Did they take into account both the construction and use of temporary road in addition to the additional vehicle traffic due to the permanent widening of Elizabeth Drive?

12.  Would TfNSW reconsider providing a noise wall at this location?

13.  Can you please provide details of who Council should write to, in order to seek for provision of a noise wall.

14.  In reference to the public consultation process undertaken by the TfNSW for the project, what public consultation process was undertaken

15.  Were the residents in the streets adjoining the proposed works (Isabel St, Burgundy Cl, Albermarle Pl and Lancaster Ave all formally notified? If so, what was the notification process?

 

The response provided by TfNSW is included as an attachment to this report. TfNSW, as part of its response, have also identified a reduction in the proposed construction lease area from 820 square metres down to 397 square metres.

 

Based on the proposed reduced construction lease, an amended plan has been provided, which identifies the new proposed construction lease area of 397 square metres, shown edged yellow, on the map below.

 

Revised Construction lease Area edged Yellow.

 

As the land is classified “Community” land, Council is limited in its dealings with the land, under the provisions of the Local Government Act 1993. On this basis, TfNSW is seeking Council's consent, to acquire the construction lease by compulsory acquisition as soon as practicable.

 

As part of its proposal to Council, TfNSW have submitted a proposed construction lease with an offer of $1pa rental to Council, if demanded. TfNSW have been advised that Council has a minimum occupation fee rate of $35 per square metre plus GST per annum in its adopted 2021/2022 Fees and Charges. Council has requested that TfNSW provide an offer, with Council reserving the right to obtain its own valuation.

 

If TfNSW agree to pay $35/sqm plus GST per annum for a reduced area of 397 square metres, a rental payment of $13,895 plus GST per annum, or $55,580 plus GST for the four-year period would be recommended. If agreed, it is proposed that this be paid to Council as a lump sum at the commencement of the lease.

 

Council would also seek payment of all costs, including an Admin Fee and Legal fees, associated with the proposal.

 

If agreement cannot be made to compensation, under the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991, the Valuer-General would determine compensation pursuant to the acquisition. Under this process, Council would have the ability to make a claim for compensation and obtain its own valuation. If Council does not agree to the Valuer General’s determination, it would have the option of lodging an objection to the NSW Land and Environment Court.

 

TfNSW have requested that Council provide its written concurrence to the acquisition in either of the following terms:

 

"Council consents to the acquisition of the lease by TfNSW by compulsory process and agrees to accept compensation in the amount, as determined by the Valuer General."

 

Alternatively, if Council wishes to reserve its rights to appeal to the Land and Environment Court, in respect to the amount of compensation determined by the Valuer-General, then its written concurrence should be provided as follows:

 

"Council consents to the acquisition of the lease by TfNSW by compulsory process including the reduction of the period of the Proposed Acquisition Notice (PAN) to 7 days."

 

In reference to the request that Council provide consent to the acquisition, given Council’s limitations in dealings associated with “community” land, it is recommended that Council resolve that it has no objection to the proposal to compulsorily acquire a construction lease over the identified Council “community” land.

 

TfNSW have also sought a reduction to the standard Proposed Acquisition Notice period of 90 days to 7 days, to provide certainty of obtaining construction access to the site. It is recommended, that Council approve a reduced period of 14 days to allow for Council to review its claim for compensation if agreement has not been reached beforehand.

 

While the approach is to reach agreement with TfNSW, in the absence of an agreement for compensation the Valuer General will determine compensation. A further report will be provided to Council if the Valuer General determines compensation in this matter.

 

It is also recommended that Council enter into an agreement for compensation, if TfNSW agree to pay the rate of $35 per square metre plus GST per annum, and all of Council’s costs in this matter upon commencement of the construction lease.

 

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

Facilitate economic development.

Environment

Support the delivery of a range of transport options.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

There are no civic leadership and governance considerations.

Legislative

Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991 and Local Government Act 1993.

Risk

The risk is deemed to be Low Risk as TfNSW would be requires to compulsorily acquire a construction lease interest and pay compensation to Council.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Plan - Original Proposed Construction Lease Area Hatched Green

2.         TfNSW response to Liverpool City Council - Questions taken on notice at Council meeting on 27 October 2021

 

 


0

ECD 02

TfNSW proposed Construction Lease over Council land being part Lot 5000 DP 855173 off Albemarle Place, Cecil Hills

Attachment 1

Plan - Original Proposed Construction Lease Area Hatched Green

 

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0

ECD 02

TfNSW proposed Construction Lease over Council land being part Lot 5000 DP 855173 off Albemarle Place, Cecil Hills

Attachment 2

TfNSW response to Liverpool City Council - Questions taken on notice at Council meeting on 27 October 2021

 

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0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Committee Reports

 

CTTE 01

Minutes of Liverpool Access Committee meeting held on 7 October 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Encourage community participation in decision-making

File Ref

328054.2021

Report By

Galavizh Ahmadi Nia - Manager Community Development and Planning

Approved By

Tina Bono - Director Community & Culture

 

Executive Summary

 

This report is tabled in order to present the Minutes of the Liverpool Access Committee Meeting held on 7 October 2021.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

 

1.    Receives and notes the Minutes of the Access Committee Meeting held on 7 October 2021; and

 

2.    Endorses actions in the minutes.

 

REPORT

 

The Minutes of the Liverpool Access Committee Meeting held on 7 October 2021 are attached for the information of Council.

 

The Minutes contain two actions for Council officers to undertake, none of which will have any financial impact on Council.

·    Community Development Worker (Aged and Disability) to circulate the information regarding gender diverse workshops to the Committee; and

·    Community Development Worker (Aged and Disability) to circulate the correspondence regarding Auditory Processing Disorder to the Committee.

 


CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

There are no environmental and sustainability considerations.


Social

Raise awareness in the community about the available services and facilities.

Support community organisations, groups and volunteers to deliver coordinated services to the community.

Support access and services for people with a disability.


Civic Leadership

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Minutes of the Liverpool Access Committee meeting held on 7 October 2021  


0

CTTE 01

Minutes of Liverpool Access Committee meeting held on 7 October 2021

Attachment 1

Minutes of the Liverpool Access Committee meeting held on 7 October 2021

 

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0

Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Committee Reports

 

CTTE 02

Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee held on 11 October 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Encourage community participation in decision-making

File Ref

358952.2021

Report By

Michael Zengovski - Manager City Environment

Approved By

Raj Autar - Director Infrastructure & Environment

 

Executive Summary

 

This report is tabled in order to present the Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee meeting held on 11 October 2021.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee meeting held on 11 October 2021.

 

REPORT

 

The Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee held on 11 October 2021 are attached for the information of Council.

 

The actions contained in the minutes will have no financial impact on Council.

 

    

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

Minimise household and commercial waste.

Manage air, water, noise and chemical pollution.

Enhance the environmental performance of council assets.

Protect, enhance and maintain areas of endangered ecological communities and high quality bushland as part of an attractive mix of land uses.

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.


Social

Consider planning policy that deliver safer communities.

Balance recreational needs and community expectation with conservation outcomes.


Civic Leadership

Act as an environmental leader in the community.

Encourage the community to engage in Council initiatives and actions.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.

Risk

There is no risk associated with this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

1.         Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee Meeting held on 11 October 2021  


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CTTE 02

Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee held on 11 October 2021

Attachment 1

Minutes of the Environment Advisory Committee Meeting held on 11 October 2021

 

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Ordinary Meeting

24 November 2021

Committee Reports

 

CTTE 03

Minutes of Strategic Panel meeting held on 11 October 2021

 

Strategic Direction

Leading through Collaboration

Strive for best practice in all Council processes

File Ref

352922.2021

Report By

George Georgakis - Manager Council and Executive Services

Approved By

George Hampouris - Acting Director Corporate Services

 

Executive Summary

 

This report is tabled in order to present the Minutes of the Strategic Panel Meeting held on 11 October 2021.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council receives and notes the Minutes of the Strategic Panel Meeting held on 11 October 2021.

 

REPORT

 

The Minutes of the Strategic Panel meeting held on 11 October 2021 are attached for the information of Council.

 

There are no outstanding actions contained in the minutes. Response to questions taken on notice/action items were provided to Councillors on 20 October 2021.

 

    

CONSIDERATIONS

 

Economic

There are no economic and financial considerations.

Environment

Utilise the Western Sydney City Deal agreement to enhance liveability and environment of the LGA.

Utilise the Western Sydney City Deal agreement to facilitate Planning and Housing in the LGA.

Manage the environmental health of waterways.

Manage air, water, noise and chemical pollution.

Raise community awareness and support action in relation to environmental issues.


Social

There are no social and cultural considerations.


Civic Leadership

Provide information about Council’s services, roles and decision making processes.

Operate a well developed governance system that demonstrates accountability, transparency and ethical conduct.

Actively advocate for federal and state government support, funding and services.

Legislative

There are no legislative considerations relating to this report.